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It depends on whether it makes sense to let the user choose a default or not. If yes, then you're looking for a disambiguation dialog. In newer Android versions, it's a bottom sheet rather than a dialog: If, on the other hand, you want the user to choose the app every time (such as with a custom share dialog), you would use an app chooser, which looks like ...


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As UX Labs mentioned, these are scrolling tabs. Sometimes they are called "scrollable containers." On Windows Phone, they used to be called "Pivot Control." Sample code: https://codepen.io/srees/pen/pgVLbm Library: https://material.io/develop/web/components/tabs/scroller/ Medium articles: https://medium.com/flexbox-and-grids/how-to-create-horizontally-...


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According to the developers' information from Android it is an App Chooser.


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The Real Issue But the Find function is already perfectly visible to users. It’s right there with other critical functions like Copy and Paste under… say, where did…? You’re only scratching the surface of a bigger problem. For reasons not explainable by science, certain browser designers elected to hide the menu bar by default. They apparently felt it ...


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If you're looking for an interaction pattern name: It's just a column or pane divider. Whether or not it's resizable is up to you. The general arrangement is a sort of modified Miller Column or master detail UI. If you're looking for the code function to call: You came to the wrong SE site.


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This may be a good example of the caveat contained in the MS guidelines for Ribbons. Generally the guidelines have this to say about duplicating items between tabs: Here are some common pitfalls to avoid ... Avoid multiple paths to the same command—especially if the path is unexpected or the command requires many clicks to invoke. It may seem ...


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There's no guidelines in Material for QR codes. And there will never be And as we're at it, no mobile framework or guideline will ever have it either! See, QR codes are meant as an easy way to transmit information from real, physical world to a virtual dimension. Basically, a bridge that joins the information gap between the physical world and its binary ...


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If I understand correctly, this feature is a way to share the current screen with students, right? In that case, since it's just another way to share content, the placement for this feature should be the same as it would be for a standard "Share" button, which resides either in the toolbar as an icon or in the action overflow (the three-dot menu at the end ...


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I was trying to understand your question and linkage to material design principles. I really struggled to link both, as material design doesn't really provide direct answer to your question, but it rather guides thru some core design principles. Your solution is not bad at all, but it could be improved a bit and would require proper user testing and ...


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This touches a lot of areas that are more to do with implementing a solution than designing one, and so aren't really suitable for UX... however: Where to put the controls? Starting with the most UX-focused question: where to put the greyed-out or hidden controls until mobile is ready? I think it depends on whether you end up going for hiding or greying-...


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I don't believe Ctrl+F is that unused. It's a very basic shortcut available in a wide array of applications: browsers, text editors (from Notepad to the full Office suite), File Explorer, etc. You also have to consider that it can confuse users. Currently, a search box on a webpage usually means "search this site."


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Aren't they "Push" elements, as opposed to "Pull" ones? http://ui-patterns.com/blog/Designing-for-push-and-pull-in-web-design states "When we design to influence our users through a push strategy, we begin by forecasting their needs and then designing the most efficient system to ensure everything our users need is available at the right time and the ...


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@Mike answered with a good name which is "App Chooser." This is the name used by the guidelines. @Tin Man answered: "It depends on whether it makes sense to let the user choose a default or not. If yes, then you're looking for a disambiguation dialog. In newer Android versions, it's a bottom sheet rather than a dialog:" "Note the lack of "Just ...


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Blink elements are not so used because they doesnt grant accessibility and could also produce problems to people with cognitive disorders. Wikipedia provide a short, but interesting, history about blink element. From that source two anecdotes: A 1982 Apple Computer manual for developers advised against using blinking text, warning that "flashing [text] ...


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Try a dropdown where you can select multiple items at once. When the user clicks on the dropdown (A), it expands. The user can then select multiple items (second and third image). After clicking close, the user will see the selected items (fourth image). The idea is that you use only one. Multiple dropdown menu's with multiple options will confuse the user....


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Obviously I don't have the contextual knowledge of the app itself that you have, but it sounds to me that if you can't come up with a concise and unambiguous way to say this, then the user won't stand a chance at understanding your intent. To mitigate this confusion, I would decide on two distinct phrases and include a "?" help icon next to the data labels ...


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It goes by a few different names, but the most widely accepted name is "Splitter" Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 Example 4 Example 5 Example 6


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I think that's will be a lot usefull for tech users, for example in a tech products ecommerce. A really good idea. But I think the user that ask doesn't wants to duplicate SearchInPage browser function, the user may propose activate the ecommerce product searh box to launch a query to the engine. Difficult to do because yo need to override CTRL+F browser ...


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You should ask yourself why. For five times. You need a search box. Why? Because users don't know how to use Browser search feature. Why? Because it's hidden and you can't help. Why they need it? Because search engines won't link to specific page content but always to its beginning. Page is full of content and they have to scroll down to find what they need ...


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