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6

I must say, this is an extremely interesting question / problem. You are momentarily put in a tough spot. On one side you want to include all users, while at the other side you need to keep the whole process of buying a ticket smooth so other users will not experience any hiccups. As one of the early adopters you (and maybe people that read this) are facing ...


3

Consider how AirBnB shows the maximum number of guests allowed in a location. They start by asking the user to put in their number of guests. If it's missed here, the user can change it on the next screen, where they have the same dropdown as on the previous search. This time though, the results will dynamically update as the user changes their number of ...


2

Most travel websites suck when it comes to anything other than single guests or couples, especially with children. In many cases, you have to special case kids even more: Infants usually don’t count, but may require a crib. Toddlers may stay for free if sleeping in bed with their parents, but sometimes have to pay for breakfast, though probably not full ...


2

I think you should consider the goal of your user in this case. If you have any idea what your typical user is, you could figure this out by defining personas or talking to a few potential users. I would expect that, when a user considers buying a ticket, the following applies: Is it going to be worth it, or is walking just as fast/efficient? Not knowing ...


2

Reducing the distractions to a minimum raises the chance that your users will actually book something on your site. Its pretty common that websites change the header to a minimalistic header that removes part of the navigation and/or just displays the logo. Therefor i think reducing the footer to a minimum can make sense when we talk about something like ...


2

I have noticed a mini-footer or no footer at all in the checkout funnel and I personally think it makes a lot of sense as the checkout step is actually from which the company will make money so you want this step to be as clear as possible and with minimum amount of distractions. Booking funnel? I usually book with 1 click.. If you have more complex system ...


2

Forcing a user to update or upgrade software (either without consent in the background or by restricting access to the software until the user performs the necessary steps) is a painful experience for all users. Let's say that you have a user who tries to boot your software (likely with the intention of accessing flight or ticket information) and then they ...


1

I think there's not only just a single issue or solution to consider here. First, the importance of the Search field should be given to the user via it's size, For the same considerations, date-timepicker icon and person-counter should be preferred smaller, Then the color of the Search button and the rest of the secondary important information can be chosen ...


1

While the filling field is white, which means an active area, you can set the optional areas as inactive using other colors or textures. They will became active only when the user clicks on them. Or optional with a dashed border:


1

I would suggest the dates and rooms fields are defaulted to say "No Specific Dates" and "No Specific Room Size" (or something along those lines). That makes it clear that they are optional and the user can precede without selected them. When the user clicks either of them, you can then allow them to specify the values as you currently do ...


1

I think recently searched should be on top.It depends on the use case still recent works better as if the user has travelled recently to one of the favourites it is automatically listed there. Alternatively, you can also show favourites before user enter "From and To" so that user can choose favourites (Routes or destination).


1

A Heuristic map of the flow would be a good idea, at a high level. Combining it with your data can help you create 'How Might We' statements and pin them on the map to see if you're targeting the user problem and correcting the journey. It would be feasible to start moving into the sketching phase of the design process and conduct usability tests on the ...


1

Focus on what matters This is a travel website and your Destinations pages are only 10% of traffic? That seems suspicious. Cross-referencing analytics and user testing you should be able to identify why that is fairly quickly. You'll have to ask yourself a lot of questions about how visitors move specifically to, from, or around that area. Are you ...


1

In your situation, I'd start by defining the user goals for this section of your site. Once I had those, I'd work out what sub-journeys were strictly necessary to meet those goals e.g. the checkout process on an ecommerce website. Then I'd work out what sub-journeys most users would have to take in order to meet the site's user goals. Once I'd done that, ...


1

So, you would hide that long and tedious list inside a drop down menu or under a text box search? Well, that's the difference between an objetive search and just browsing. When I see that list I think three things: look how complete this website is look how many places I can go look how few places I've been to, definitly I need to travel more Sometimes ...


1

You don't need a modal; instead, have it straight on the site: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This way the user isn't blocked by a modal. However, the downside is this is an added layer before they can start shopping, but it won't be intrusive in any way. Also, this can be saved by cookies so it won't be a repetitive ...


1

This to be improved by just going through a few exercises: List the use cases of each screen for the user. For example, "I want to see all of my cards", "I want to see how many transactions are on each card" Prioritize this list by going through your design and acting out what you think users would typically do. Once you've got that list, redo the design ...


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