89

Great question! This is an good case for microinteraction design. Microinteraction objectives In descending order of priority: Provide clear affordance for user to place card/wallet on reader Provide clear feedback that the user should hold the card on the reader until an outcome. Since this is public transportation, provide blind- and deaf- friendly ...


28

To expand a bit on jamesqf's answer, while the airlines decide much of the interior layout, window placement is driven by structural elements of the aircraft. An airliner fuselage has a series of circular frames, and windows go in the gaps between these frames: You can't really change the window alignment without changing frame spacing, and doing that is a ...


27

This is where I'd argue that UX isn't the one to fix this. All they can do is apply duct tape and band aids to a poorly implemented technology. Fix the technology. It simply shouldn't take 3 seconds to read an RFID chip. On top of that, asking each person to wait 3 seconds to pass through seems like a logistical nightmare for crowd management. This is ...


18

In the Parliament of Ukraine they use both visual and audial means while voting, you can see youtube video (~10s). The sound consist of several tones which are percieved as the sequence, so stopping it somewhere in the middle sounds not natural. The row has some kind of harmony and natural feeling of the length. You could try to play some ~3s sound when ...


12

The problem is that seat layouts are something that is decided by the airlines, not the aircraft manufacturer. There are a large number of possible seat layouts for any particular model, for instance http://www.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a330family/a330-300/cabin-layout/ In addition, seat layouts for any particular plane might be ...


10

The XBox added a visual camera input device called the Kinect. They defined a number of gesture inputs, covered on the linked page and this one. This 2nd link includes the 'hold to select' gesture. Point the palm of your hand toward the screen, and move the on-screen hand over the item you want to select. To select an item, keep your hand over the item ...


8

Remove seats in the front area The area between the doors is often occupied by people standing, while the seats in the back are empty. Obviously, people gain more from standing there than from sitting in the back. If this is a city bus, with short distances between stops, people might value ease of getting off the bus above sitting. When transitioning from ...


7

Adding to Alexey's great answer: You could have the reader play a sequence of tones in a scale that move toward a resolution; when the card is done reading, a resolving chord would play. This would make it even clearer that the reader is done, eliminating any doubt as to whether the sequence of notes is finished. I believe this could be done in such a way ...


7

You can start looking at existing systems in the public sector. Take for example pedestrian-crossing lights with a ticking sound for visually impaired people. It's a continuously ticking sound and it ticks fast enough to notice something is in progress. It can be a softer, shorter and different sound than the beep. For those who can't hear it can be combined ...


6

For me, I see this as two problems: 1) knowing that an outlet exists, 2) knowing the location of the outlet. Since this is an education problem, I would to try to let the passenger learn this information at multiple, accessible touch points. Here are a few of suggestions to explore. Signs at the ticket counter. This may be the first point of contact a ...


4

This is a common situation for bus drivers and passengers in Australia as well (hard to believe since our population size and density is nowhere near what it is compared to other cities). I have often thought that sacrificing some of the advertising space positioned at the eyeline (and above, which is where people look at to avoid looking directly at someone ...


4

In U.S. English a "bagger" is the person who bags your groceries at the store. According to Google, other options are either a type of motorcycle, or construction equipment like a dredger or backhoe. Assuming you mean something like this: ...the answer is that they are not all yellow. In Japan, they're often gray & purple. Some are green, or orange,...


4

Audio only feedback - Play a rising tone that ends in a pleasant note when finished. Initially users would not know what the tone meant but once they use it the first time they will be trained. Or play a slightly annoying sound that ends once the card is read. Think like the scratchy changing sound of the geiger counter. Visual feedback - A single yellow ...


4

I guess your question is why is there a need for specifically marked seats when normally people give up their seats anyway. The seats with labels and color are specifically designed for lesser able-bodied people. There's more space to sit and it's close to the entrance/exit. People are required to give up these seats if someone who fits the criteria (...


3

We can try to analyze this from an information load perspective. The number system probably has the least information. You can more or less deduce which line was built after which - which might be helpful if you're familiar with the history of the city, but otherwise not so much. So it relies on memory alone. The letter system is pretty much like the number ...


3

It makes a lot of sense to have auditory as well as visual cues as to when and where one has to exit, as some people cannot see that well, while others cannot hear that well. As to the sign on the opposite door: The view of the correct door might be blocked (especially when sitting (in a seat, wheelchair, etc)) People who are facing the closed door do not ...


2

I don't think that there is a design solution to encourage people to move to the rear of the bus by default. This is not a task people have in their heads when they board the bus. There are folks with a task to enter the bus and find something to hold on to, and there are folks who want to board and find a place to seat. Besides that, some people will stand ...


2

As users are likely not used to technology working this slowly, the best system may be one that uses a combination of methods to help guide them to using the system correctly. However, (as other answers have shown) it's difficult to convey "waiting" through a static visual aid alone, and it may be too costly to add a screen conveying proper use. I think ...


1

I think the right way is to combine different methods: Color coded is my favourite, but it is limited because when there are 15-20 lines, could be difficult to code each line. Besides, it's not a completely accessible way, is not usable by color blind. Lettering + Numbering: Milan for example uses the code: M1, M2, M3 for metropolitan train. S1, S2, S3 for ...


1

One possibility is a Retractable Key Ring (many, many designs available; an example chosen more-or-less at random below). These consist of a key-ring on the end of a length of cord that is normally retracted and wound around a spring-loaded bobbin inside the main body. To use, you pull the end of the cord (where the key-fob would be attached) out from the ...


1

If you regularly wear a wristwatch, I would suggest to wear it(the tag) attached to your watch, as it's the only thing that you'll never need to "pull out" of your pocket. You can otherwise wear it attached to some wrist band, like the rubber ones, with fancy quotes on them. WristWatch Vs. Fancy WristBands But as it is a (unrestricted)payment method, human ...


1

Remove the two stairs to the rear of the Bus There is a relation between this problem to this famous example: People are taking the convenient way, which not necessarily the designed one. Also see this article: Why People Avoid Pedestrian Bridges? People are risking their lives, crossing crowded roads just to avoid climbing stairs. Not claiming to be an ...


1

would it make sense to have exactly one well positioned and well sized window per row? That depends on what "well-sized" means. If it is just large enough so several people could theoretically look through it at a time, that might not be enough, because the window could still be blocked by the person sitting right next to it. In that respect, two small ...


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