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48

Simple answer, the law states that they must be off per default. Privacy by default: https://www.ics.ie/news/what-is-privacy-by-design-a-default Accept all/reject all buttons are a nice touch, go ahead and use that!


21

As the most highly voted answer is simply false I am writing this answer just clarify the legalities in the EU. Under GDPR there are 6 lawful bases for processing personal data. The two we care about are consent legitimate interest Consent Consent is something that is opt-in and allows a company to process personal data in nearly limitless ways. To ...


8

I suggest to add a top level selection between filter X or boosters using radio buttons. Then a secondary level underneath Boosters where they can be selected using checkboxes. If the Filter X radio button is selected, disable the Booster checkboxes. Depending on whether you want a clear option to have neither Filter X nor Boosters you could add another ...


4

If it is not a confirmation pop/up (which you should try to avoid, since users tend to get them out of the way without reading the message within) the answer is no. I have to say that I'm thinking about a switch as toggle. A switch does enable or disable something full stop. I doubt that a user would expect something else using a switch. If it triggers a ...


4

Technically it could, but it's not the expected behavior. When clicking on a toggle the user expects to switch from a state to another , he does not expect to get a pop-in. Except if it's an important warning really related to the state on wich the user have just switch on by clicking on the toggle , i would personally not recomend to use a toggle to ...


4

They should be off by default, AND there shouldn't be too many of them (max 3). There are some sites that do malicious compliance by giving EVERY SINGLE domain their site uses a separate toggle defaulted to on, which breaks the law and gives users that wish to disable them all a horribly designed user experience meant to just make them give up and allow ...


3

A toggle having colour indicates that it is switched "on" - in this case, that means YES. You shouldn't need any further information. The tick/cross icons can add a fun little bit of flavour to the toggles, but I believe that explanations for toggles generally aren't necessary - the Material guidelines for switches agrees with that idea.


2

I'm suprised you named the case of a switch but did not visualize it and went directly to a more complex one like segmented tabs. Normally a checkbox would be optimal for a binary option, but in this case you correctly noted that there might be confusion since there are two. I think you were already on the right path here. A switch works for binary ...


2

Try adding interval controls only when a user asks to display them. Keep the fields open for input, and surface the option to save only after a user modifies the time interval grid. I hope I understand your use case correctly, but here goes: The initial display can be your default. If most users find it helpful, start with the checkbox enabled. That state ...


2

I suggest to clearly seperate Boosters and Filters if there are not compatible. Here are 2 ideas : A with a tab system that force user to choose one group B Separate vertically both categories and mentioning it is an OR choice


2

The metaphor that comes to my mind is that of a bidirectional joystick or jog switch type control: At rest in a neutral, central position, and causing motion in the direction of either excursion (up or down, left or right). If executed well, the action of the UI control you describe is very learnable by users, especially if you describe the electric window ...


1

That NN/g article is correct, and the answer to your question is, Yes! :) As also stated in, say, the Switch section of the Material Design Guidelines, the key behavior of a switch is that "[w]hen a user toggles a switch, its corresponding action takes effect immediately." Every time I've discussed this aspect with fellow Ix designers, we agreed that "...


1

Toggles can only be two way also they are tricky. I think what you looking for is a group button. It is way more intuitive than toggle (it clearly show what is selected, and are labeled), however group buttons require more space than toggle. I will do it this way:


1

It seems you may have two issues: which segment is selected, and what can the user search on, especially if the user comes with an immediate intention to search. In your mock, you have two different data sets, but you're using a control placement way to the right of the data, so to see at a glance which is selected, my eyes have to look right. The search ...


1

It's definitely a challenge with toggle buttons. We had to use them in one of our projects and we assumed that indicating the active state by changing the background to the primary colour would be enough. However, user interviews showed us that we were wrong. Whenever we had a collection of three toggle buttons, the user did not seem to be confused. When it ...


1

You can try removing the background color of the button to indicate inactive state. Having color on both the states is confusing because they both stand out equally. To further improve, use bold typeface for the active state.


1

I think this is a very interesting case in understanding whether skeumorphism is the best approach for replicating a physical functionality digitally. Another well-known example is the notorious volume control button which has a very good rationale in its physical implementation but not so much for digital controls (and same with toggle buttons). There are ...


1

The examples the "off" switches do not have enough contrast against the background. They look to me as if the option was not only "off" but "disabled" as well. And I would go with the plain switch or the v/x option.


1

For 3, all you need is another option called 'Others' or 'Unspecified' as a child. And keep that unchecked while the rest are selected. There is no harm in adding a few additional options if those make sense. At the heart of it all, the tree structure should be clear to the users. Including a fourth state is definitely not recommended because no one will be ...


1

In your example the red bar will help keep it clearly separate from the content. I have had this problem when scrolling the hamburger gets lost and becomes a usability issue. Before you worry about apple and google you should ensure that the navigation works for your users. IMO the red bar or something to keep a hierarchy between the nav and your content is ...


1

Assuming that the UI change is not just a simple BG color change, the switch element is not really appropriate to change between two equal levels of hiearchy. According to Apple and Google: A switch is a visual toggle between two mutually exclusive states—on and off. Use switches to: Toggle a single option on or off, on mobile and tablet ...


1

The method you have chosen is used by a number of high-profile sites, Reddit being one of them: The broader question must be "what is the difference between the two interfaces?" If it is simply to provide a switch between dark and light themes, then there's little to tell the user, as long as nothing prevents them in reverting the change or makes it more ...


1

I found the filtering system in Jira is a combination of search, filter, and/or exclude. When you search for tickets, or projects, or people, or keywords, it allows you to have a granular control on what you are searching for. I understand that it might look a bit overwhelming, but perhaps they have an implementation that can inspire you and put you on ...


1

many browsers, if not all have a built-in focus state. I am using that.


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