Hot answers tagged

102

Add the time of the last update. That way users have a better understanding how old or new the information is. But it only works if you can use the users system clock to determine the shown time. If you see that people don't think about refreshing the page, you can also provide a link for it:


94

There is no reason to calculate this for the user unless you truly believe they cannot tell time. "Your order will be ready at 18:12" should suffice; it does not matter how many minutes away that is. This allows the user to make a quick mental note of when to check on their order instead of forcing them to think "Oh, it's 18:10 right now and 9 ...


10

Second choice is better to manage user expectations about estimated time. You can create background process auto refresh every X second for update estimated time left, so user don't need to refresh the browser manually. Make Optimistic UI with time display as countdown and give progress bar on circle.


8

Use the ISO format for combined date and time values. It's best to stick to the standards, especially when dealing with dates. The above linked Wikipedia article states (emphasis mine): A single point in time can be represented by concatenating a complete date expression, the letter "T" as a delimiter, and a valid time expression. For example, &...


7

Retain the AM/PM for 12-hour format -- 08:35 AM | 08:35 PM. Or choose the 24-hour format -- 08:35 | 20:35. One of the primary tenets of UX design is to not make the user think. By skipping the AM/PM, you're forcing the user to see just 08:35 and think your system uses 24-hour formats when you're not, and probably interpret it as AM when it could be either AM ...


4

Tom, how granular does this setting have to be? Especially for less technically savvy users, providing a set of meaningful presets could already do the trick. E.g., here's the menu for setting the alert for a calendar event (taken from Fantastical for Mac): If you click Custom…, you get to see this: If that doesn't work, you could simply concatenate ...


4

I'm not aware of any psychological or technical term for this, but "familiarity breeds contempt" and it's common for creatives to start second-guessing a design when a project is going on too long and there's pressure to deliver something great. This might obliquely be related to impostor syndrome in junior-level designers -- it seems to lessen when you ...


3

It depends on the tradeoffs (and the story you need to convey): You can break the charts into adjacent, separate displays, or change the chart to emphasize relative change over time. Break into separate displays: This tradeoff means you have precision about each figure, but need to parse 2 data points. You can try to amend this with interaction with either ...


3

I assume you are booking appointment with a doctor or say car service maintenance. To make most out of specialist time Imagine your doctor works from 10:00 to 12:00, strict timing makes it possible to serve 4 patients. If you allow random time booking there will be gaps and less patinets will be served. Also most of the time there is no point in ...


2

The following is correct: a label on the horizontal axis is the measurement from the beginning of that hour to the start of the next hour Take your first two labels for example. The data point for 14:00 should encompass activity that took place during the 14th hour, i.e. the time from 14:00 to 14:59. It's easier to wrap your mind around it if you think of ...


2

This is something that can occur with any creative process, not just design. If you spend a lot of time working on something, it becomes overfamiliar. It's always necessary to step away from a project periodically to refresh your perspective.


2

This is how Outlook does it: it uses elapsed time. An event from March 28th 7am to March 30th 7am has a duration of 47 hours (the switch to daylight savings time happened March 29th this year where I live): This makes sense to me: I'm specifying begin and end time, so I'm thinking in hours. You could show a message somewhere to indicate that the event ...


2

I take it this is unambiguous to a human reader rather than a machine? The ISO 8601 is a good suggestion for machine readable/parseable data, but for human readability it's trickier. E.g. the US does dates with months and days swapped round, so in your example do you mean the 5th December or the 12th May? That's bit me a few times in the past - while the ...


1

When reading the question, the Amazon parcel tracking app sprang to mind. That shows the location of the driver, but only updates every 30 seconds or so. In between time, it shows how long ago it was updated, incrementing every 10 seconds. Something similar might suit your needs - as it gives a view of how current your information is but still updates at a ...


1

Without seeing the data or what correlations you want to show it's difficult to say. Sometimes you just have to see what visualization method suits the data and the users by "trying them on". It sounds like you might benefit from trying the data in violin plots or stream graphs? There's a good selection to review here: http://visualizationuniverse.com/...


1

I think notifications should be displayed for an unlimited amount of time on any platform. To solve the number of notifications a user is receiving you can allow them to customize the type of notifications they receive. Try grouping notifications too, this will help you categorize the importance of a notification. As a user, I'm always annoyed when I'm ...


1

What are the usability benefits of having 30-minute intervals for time slots when let's say, booking an appointment? Less options makes it easier to choose one, which make it quicker to fill out a form with less effort. But only if that time option is sufficient for the user and only if it suits whatever it is for, obviously. The question needs far more ...


1

I think it happens with every designer. Once you create a design , it feels one thing but when we see other design, it feels something else. I assume you are specifically talking about visual design. Visuals are very subjective but there are some general principles which can be used to create good design. Check this link specifically for mobile app design ...


1

For mobile device I would vote for single input with validation since it is much faster and easier to enter time alltogther rather that switching between inputs for tracking runner time Input is heavely validated to make sure user match desired format: __:__:__.____ This process of entering time will happen over and over again so runner and coach will get ...


1

I tend to lean toward ISO, but with file-naming limitations, the benefits of sorting, and yet still relatively human friendly, for your use case, I'd actually lean toward something like: 2020y01m14d_12h30m11s_8765ms-23hrs-UTC.log 2020y01m15d_12h31m11s_7654ms-23hrs-UTC.log 2020y01m16d_12h27m11s_9867ms-23hrs-UTC.log 2020y01m17d_12h41m11s_5432ms-23hrs-...


1

I prefer to represent all of data in 2 digits as follows, 20Y02M14D12H30M11S86SS75MS.log But if you have to keep year and millisecond in 4 digits then you might use the following one, 2020Y02M14D12H30M11S8675MS.log


1

When formatting durations (or any other measurements, for that matter), make sure that the precision you provide aligns with your intended users and usages. For example, for a scientist, the difference between 778 ms and 812 ms might be crucial, whereas for a less tech-savvy user, "about a second" would be just fine for either duration, and also much easier ...


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