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312

If you are developing a Windows application, the correct term to use is "Exit". This is spelt out in Microsoft's Design apps for the Windows desktop guide, under the "Standard Menu Bars" section. If you are developing a Mac application, the correct term to use is "Quit". (Your menu item must read "Quit AppName".) This is spelt out in Apple's OS X Human ...


85

The newspapers use justified text as they have multiple columns side-by-side so the justification works as a line separator. The majority of web content (text) is not placed inside small columns we just have the standard long lines and people are very well used to it. On the other hand; newspapers cannot use long lines because it will be difficult for ...


73

The Terms The following table summarises the conventional terms, which are platform dependent. On Windows, you run an application, then exit it. Ditto for Unix command line tools. However, both old documentation and pretty much all windows 8 documentation uses Open/Close. On a Mac (which deep inside is Unix-based) you open an application, but then quit it....


61

Designers When it's your working version and you just want some text in there to visualise the overall page balance, and you'll only share it with other designers, then using Lorum ipsum should probably be fine. End users For end users, I would suggest using some other real example text. Yes, you'd have to localise this, but it's quite easy to simply take ...


53

I believe the usual justification is to prevent folks from copying and pasting the content so that they don't steal it. I usually roll my eyes at this because if a user really wants that text, you can get it one way or another, even with selection disabled. I came across another example: a developer wanted to disable selection because double-clicking a ...


51

Yes, there are guidelines for placing text over images Here is guidance from a few highly regarded organizations: Nielsen/Norman Group provides good guidance on how to place text over images while ensuring high enough contrast to ensure readability: When combining emotion-provoking imagery with informational text, ensure that the text is readable by ...


50

There is a better solution, at least in terms of legibility, perhaps not so much aesthetically. And I'm 99% sure you've already seen it. Black border, white letters. White letters are almost always brighter than the background, and the black outlines act as a sort of shadow, separating the text from the background. Of course, the best legibility is still ...


48

It's a myth that selectable text is "costless" As a general principle you are right that text should be selectable. That said, since you're asking about non-selectable text, here are some cases to be aware of for disabling text selection. There are visual elements containing text that users don't expect to be selectable. For example: Let's walk ...


45

I would not disturb the text editing area. You never know where the user is editing, so let her use her time in the box as she likes. Instead I would make it clear at all times how much time is left, and show that the submission will automatically be carried out when the time is out, by blinking the button when the time is running out. In the mockup below ...


41

This is a good approach, however I would recommend putting the ellipses in the middle of the shortened string rather than at the end. It is commonly the last portion of the URL that distinguishes it from others, so by putting the ellipses in the middle you are not truncating the useful part of the URL. Example: www.thisisalongdomain.com/section/category/...


36

Since <h*> means heading, this shows a hierarchy. The different numbers are a level ranking from high to bottom or maximum to minimum, where <p> is the last step. Hierarchy: system in which members of an organization or society are ranked according to relative status or authority. This means: <h1> > <h2> > <h3> > <h4> ...


35

Your example shows left-to-right languages, and its better to keep the rotation of the letters the same since we see words as shapes rather than reading letter by letter. That's probably why you see more feedback signs where the word is rotated 90 degrees rather than each letter: When we read- we read the shape the word gives us, which also answers the ...


35

The best approach is to inform the user about these rules in plain language next to respective input fields. I would suggest enforcing a minimum and maximum character limit to handle edge cases and spams. UXSE Flagging feature has something similar: Notice that before I start typing anything, the message says "Enter at least 10 characters" and the submit ...


33

There is a reason when disabling the selection of text makes sense, and that is if selection of text could interfere with functional aspects of the UI. For example, it is frequently used on widgets that are draggable because you want to avoid that the user accidentally selects text when he intends to drag.


32

Left align is basically the default for Left to Right languages just because all content will line up; this is a powerful tool for readability. Generally stick with left aligning unless there's good reason not to. The exception, as you notice, is numbers. Here's a little blurb by Christian Heilmann: I chatted quickly with Luke Wroblewski about it (one ...


32

Font and layout is exactly what Lorem Ipsum is designed to do. It has been used by type setters and printers since the 1500s. The idea is that by not having real words the users focus on the layout. It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is ...


26

You could just fade the text as a function of extra-time, Fade = F(extra_time), so at some time the text would just dissapeared. It is not forcing and not punishing for user. At the same time it is a soft indicator for other users of using the extra-time for this text. This feature could be used for engaging users and giving them a badges of "black", "gray" ...


25

According to studies, the line length should not exceed 70 characters. So keep your paragraph width between 50 and 70 characters. So actually you should not care about the width in pixels, but rather the width in ems (The width relative to the font-size). So go for 30-50em. Also wikipedia says: Some studies have shown that 100 cpl can be read faster ...


24

Based on UX.Movement: Why Text in All Caps is Hard for Users to Read The reason of the worse readability of uppercase vs lowercase is the lower contrast of shape. Small caps still has worse contrast of shape than lower case, so it'll still be less readable. There is also some relationship with familiarity, taking into account that for sure more of the 90%...


23

I think you're trying to solve a readability problem the wrong way. Line length (measure) is your real problem. The number generally advised for a readable measure is about 60-70 characters. Cut the measure to about 60% of it's current length and you'll find you have far less trouble. The other way to solve it is a bigger font size ... that would be really ...


23

Ariel is on the right track. Uppercase letters are generally much more distinguishable from each other. L won't get mixed up with 1 or the lower case l, as Ariel mentioned. If you look around, you can find a mixture of upper and lowercase, but from the user perspective, typing in a mixture can be cumbersome. So to make it more user friendly, keep it in one ...


22

No,for the simple reason that justified text can often create large blocks of white spaces which breaks the continuity of flow of words. To quote this article found in UX movement When you use justified text, you’re not only making text difficult to read for non-dyslexic users, but even more so for dyslexic users. Justified text creates large uneven ...


22

I can think of a few reasons. It's a simpler mental model. You copy something and you paste it. You don't paste the result of some transformation of the object you copied, you get the exact same object you picked up. Simpler actions are better in that they are more predictable and less confusing. It's called "paste", it's not called "remove formatting and ...


22

Lets look at the logic that why icons are used the first place. Icons make use of our "scanning" ability which is quicker than "reading". If you put Text First then you are putting less efficient way to learn first and more efficient way later. Doesn't make sense. Steve Krug in his book "Don't make me think" almost killed himself advocating not to use ...


22

To create connection between image and description use the proximity principle from the set of Gestalt principles, giving less space to connect the elements and more space between chunks of information to separate. This gives good results both for above or below description placement. To support information consumption flow, exploiting human's percertion, I'...


20

Yes, this is a "standard". I am >25 too and I know where to look up this guideline :-) This is guideline 2.3/16 in: Smith S. L., Mosier J. N. (1986) Guidelines for Designing User Interface Software (ESD-TR-86-278), Bedford: The MITRE Corporation | http://www.idemployee.id.tue.nl/g.w.m.rauterberg/lecturenotes/DA308/MITRE(1986)smith-mosier.pdf Authors ...


20

I would suggest using the Microsoft Windows User Interface Text formatting guidelines. In short it says: Use title-style capitalization for titles, sentence-style capitalization for all other UI elements. Exception: For legacy applications, you may use title-style capitalization for command buttons, menus, and column headings if necessary to avoid mixing ...


20

Exit I don't know if your user base is international but I guess it is of varying levels of English and varying levels of IT skills. Exit is universal for leave, quit and go away (remember not everyone thinks like us geeks!) Take these users: The grandma who has just got her first laptop I want this to go away ... quit [negative connotations, implies it is ...


19

As an extension to other answers, which describe good visual hints for writers: You could auto-submit the text in background when the time is up and indicate to the user that he/she is allowed to make minor changes, but all changes after the timeout will be marked. It's his/her decision when to finally submit. This way there is no hard limit. They may ...


19

Your assumption is correct, items ordered in a vertical list rather than a horizontal list or as a grid is a lot easier on the eyes to scan. The reason is quite straight forward, horizontal lists need to span a larger area and therefore the user has to move their focus larger distances which is tiring on the eyes. Same thing with grids, here the user has ...


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