34

The first time I saw this behavior was with Office 95. Word, to this day, still does this. In Word and Other applications like Notepad++, this cursor change indicates "a whole line" is the point of selection. Clicking while the cursor is in this state will select the entire line. Selecting an entire line is especially useful activity in text editors like ...


20

Why are the textboxes without boxes? It is an interesting principal of material design and choice. The reason Google went without the box was because it's analogical to writing on ruled paper. Material is all about having one constant "material" for your page so boxes would be constituted a different element and a different material. Another reason is the ...


19

The principal problem to my eyes is that I'm scanning column wise instead of left to right. Any marks that appear towards the bottom of the character indicating 'b' or 'd' would not be enough for my eyes to quickly determine the character. I suggest you make a change to one of the character's top strokes. Maybe a one pixel dot towards the 'inside' (left if ...


16

You may be able to play around with the idea of drawing them both using a single stroke, and differentiating by a small gap in between the vertical and the c curve. For "b" you could leave a gap at the top point where the c meets the l, and for "d", the gap could be left at the bottom instead. This effectively makes it appear as 1 stroke, or 2, and might ...


15

Having your cursor slanted would be a UX improvement over a permanently vertical cursor. Many word processors already do this. Here are some examples from MS Word: It gives additional feedback to a user that the text they enter will be italic, and it is visually less confusing when selecting text. At the same time, I can't think of any reason that it ...


14

As a programmer, I prefer the line breaking to happen at the boundaries of words (assuming your assessment that line breaking is needed is correct). However, I would change the way you break. Instead of continuing at column 0, I think you should continue at the same column as the line you are breaking, and you should indicate somehow that it is not a real ...


14

As I mentioned in a comment, I don't think 'b' and 'd' are necessarily two characters that are confusing to most people. So there may be of limited interest/use in such a typeface. one and I and lowercase-L are confusing because they are often the exact same glyph in a lot of typefaces. Zero and O, thought usually slightly different are often seen as the ...


11

I think you've asked a leading question and are therefore getting answers that match your initial guess at the solution. The font variation answers are interesting for solving the general problem of distinguishing similar characters, and are particularly helpful for dyslexic readers, but in your case, you actually need to distinguish words, not characters. ...


8

For replacements I always prefer to use double square brackets with natural language: Hello, [[first name]] Double brackets rarely appear in normal text but are easy to type and read, natural language removes the need to know/lookup field names. Alternatively you can use real data with highlighting and some tool-tips, bit trickier to implement but much ...


7

Breaking up words/names is a bad idea for the simple reason that it's hard to tell where the function name begins and where it ends. Names can be abstract which makes them even more difficult for the brain to stitch back together. The first just feels more natural and although still difficult to read, you quickly can understand that text is wrapping and ...


6

Apple used to solve this in Carbon (on page 34) in two ways: 1. Use a double cursor When you are on a space between the LTR and RTL parts of the text and you type LTR characters, it will appended to the LTR part of the text, when you type RTL characters you will append it to the RTL part. The cursor is positioned at the end of the Arabic text and the ...


6

The copy command is used to make a copy of a selection. If there is no active selection, the command shouldn't go and copy something all by itself, because there is no way for a user to understand beforehand what the copy command would do without an active selection. Also, ctrl-c might be hit accidentally instead of hitting ctrl-v. If ctrl-c then clears the ...


6

What about GitHub-flavored Markdown? It leaves embedded newlines as line breaks, with no need to insert two spaces. See https://help.github.com/articles/github-flavored-markdown#newlines.


6

I'm not sure of any standards for this, but I'd start with creating undo "frames" after a .4 or .5 second pause, see how it feels and what your users think of it, then tweak from there. Additionally, I might cap it at a certain number of words (perhaps 6 or 8). If a user is a very fast typist, and is consistently outpacing whatever debounce you pick, they ...


5

One option is to set a minimum width on the code container and let the user scroll horizontally. Code that wraps unexpectedly is confusing at best, and in languages like Python it will appear completely broken. (This would be overflow-x: auto or scroll on the code element's parent in CSS.) 80 monospaced characters is often the default line length.


4

Text cursor I would consider using a block cursor to avoid any ambiguity between whether the character being entered in part of ltr or rtl text. A cursor kept at the point of insertion will always fail at the boundaries between ltr and rtl text. Navigation and selection I think one area where a small change can greatly simplify things, is to reconsider how ...


4

I have never heard of any wrapping algorithm that would break up words on anything but syllables (or soft hyphens). So breaking up a words at any arbitrary character is certainly not advisable. For programmers words in code are identifiers or operators etc. They only have meaning as a whole. So in this contexts even breaking up on syllables is ill-advised.


4

In addition to the very excellent points made by @JohnGB, there's another important factor: It's not very destructive Even as far back as the original Macintosh in 1984*, if you didn't want the text to be deleted, a simple undo (⌘-Z on the original Mac IIRC). Destructive actions only need a safety barrier if they're not easily reversed. * I can't recall ...


4

Simple text editors behave as you have described where selecting text and then typing something overwrites the text with whatever you have typed. This is partly historical, partly due to implementation simplicity, and partly a UX issue. I'll focus on the UX issues. If you select some text (called text blocking) in a paragraph - lets say it's "This is some ...


4

Yes, it should still be part of new applications I certainly still want it. There are plenty of use cases where the alignment of the text is important and your are dealing with plain text files instead of word processor documents. Two use cases come to mind immediately: tables and indentation. With a word processor you would use the table and/or paragraph ...


4

I would have a dropdown above the textarea that allows the user to select from the list of pre-defined variables (written in a user friendly way) and a button that inserts them into the textarea. I would show those variables as 'tokens' within the text, each with a control to delete. I would also want to allow power users to type variables directly and ...


4

Speak the user’s language “Form” and “text editor” are UI terms. They vaguely describe what the controls are but not what they do. Step back from the problem and get into your user’s head. You’ve described one aspect that would drive the decision (document linking). Is that the only reason? If so, you need to find a concise way to present it as a question or ...


3

For a very lightweight, easily customisable option, I would recommend the Scribe editor.


3

Interesting idea and level of detail in the thinking. My thought would be that the differentiating element between the two is the direction of the c-curve. So emphasize on that - may be make it thicker. Also, the eyes follow lines and strokes, if you give the c-curve a stroke where it thickens in the middle it'll help the eye focus on it more and follow ...


3

You can have an ellipsis (ie, three consecutive periods) enclosed in square brackets like so. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit [...] This practice used to be the MLA standard for omitting text from a direct quote around a decade ago. I've just learned the current standard is to have three periods with spaces in between and no ...


3

Well, if your users need to know markdown anyway, and there's a live / dynamic preview, you might be able to get away with having the default text for a new post include the markdown for the title. So, for example, someone clicks the "new post" button and the file they get has this: # Type your post's title here (but keep the #!) Just start typing your ...


3

Your examples are very different and answer the question by themselves. See, you'll usually have a margin, no matter if the element is overflown or not, because you shouldn't overlap elements (see your first image as example) Now, What you probably mean is padding, and in that case the answer is no, you shouldn't have a padding because you lose the visual ...


3

You are going to need a virtual on-screen keyboard because of the volume of text, the need for upper and lower case letters, and if users will typing frequently. Using only a single button to cycle through letters is crippling, and will result in a lot of frustration if you miss a letter and have to loop back around. Similarly, having to find the blank ...


3

OK, first thing first: what your client wants is easily doable, more precisely because that's the whole point of responsive typography. So this isn't really a problem. However, from your example description, it seems your client wants some specific format, and there seems to be an obvious pattern. So I'd ask her about the reasons why she wants this, if this ...


3

Tough situation. It seems that you and your client want to optimize for different things. "it does not look good" tells me that your client wants to optimize the site for his tastes. While, you seem to want to optimize for a best practice instead. If your client believes that your position on this reflects a preference (as his does) then you will not get him ...


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