40

I'd say the best two options are: 1) Display terms and conditions as long plain legalese text as usual, in a left hand column, but then summarise it in much shorter, friendlier, simpler text on the right. 500px.com does this really well: 2) Format the text in a legible manner. Separate it into linked sections with proper headings, good typography and ...


17

This is an interesting approach to this issue: “Terms of Service; Didn't Read” - https://tosdr.org e.g. Facebook ToS:


12

It is legal to do that, but you will gain no legal protection if the default state is to agree. Unless a user explicitly agrees (which means actively doing something rather than not doing something), any legal agreement that you have will be unenforceable in court. This has been tried and tested legally, so it is one of the few areas that are crystal clear....


11

Terms and Conditions, Privacy Policy, and similar documents are there primarily for legal reasons, not UX ones. So the reason that they are usually terrible to read is that they are written in legaleses rather than human speak. A good alternative is to add additional explanations in human speak next to the legalese. StackExchange is a good example to ...


8

Yes, it is confusing, as you have no visual indicator that you have finished the document. The legal issue it the real problem here. In a strict legal sense, you can not be considered to have agreed to part of a document that was hidden from you. This is like someone adding pages to the back of a page in a document that you did not know was there. It is ...


7

I have no legal training regarding terms and privacy policies, but I think one really good way to start moving web services towards resolving this problem is to approach privacy/terms/conditions in much the same way we've approached software licenses and general intellectual property licensing via common-use licenses like MIT, BSD, Creative-Commons, etc. ...


6

EULAs are a legal obligation that does not benefit the user, but rather provides legal protection for the maker of the software you're interacting with. A EULA is never for the benefit of the user. EULAs are always at the start of your interaction with a user, which means a bad EULA experience is going to give your user a bad first impression. Now the real ...


6

Hiding your T&C behind a dropdown is probably very dangerous, since a user could legitimately claim that they never saw the T&C.Check out what happened to Zappos: http://blog.ericgoldman.org/archives/2012/10/how_zappos_user.htm .


5

With all my projects the main reason is laws. In EU, you're required by law to get the users' informed and active consent before storing or accessing any kind of personal data. The ePrivacy directive – more specifically Article 5(3) – requires prior informed consent for storage ofor access to information stored on a user's terminal equipment. http://ec....


4

I just found this, and it's really amazing... The Lottery Acknowledgement has a text that reads "Please read the following information carefully" and asks you to describe whether you read it after... At least you know.


4

The requirements for Terms and Conditions as well as for your Privacy Policy are primarily a legal question and not a design question. There are things that you should be aware of design wise, but they are not requirements. There are a number of good questions already on the UX side of design requirements on this site, so I won't try to duplicate them here....


4

Nobody installs an app because they want to read the privacy policy. Your users have goals. Help them accomplish their goals. Don't get in their way. Instead, provide a link in an unobtrusive location. If you try to force users to stop their productive train of thought in order to read your legal text, they’ll either find a way to close it without reading, ...


4

You could try to store the T&C out of the App, and store a boolean (acting like a trigger) in your App. When this case occurs, push the value of the boolean on True (via WebServices) to all the devices using the app (and of course update T&Cs on your database). On launch, the App check if the boolean is on True. If yes, the App request the new T&...


3

It comes down to two related things: Ownership of action Trust The first of these is about the owner of the site wanting you to stop and notice the thing you're agreeing to, rather than just blindly agreeing. They know full well that the user probably hasn't read the terms, and is probably agreeing blindly to the T&Cs... but by forcing the user to ...


3

The reason why is that by law (and its fuzzy) people have to have enough to show that they can't accidentally accept terms, usually when payment or providing personal information is involved. So if I sign up for a newsletter on Kickstarter, no big deal. But if I agree to pay $50 for a Garfield poster...a bit more consent is needed. The reason it's fuzzy is ...


3

I see why you'd want to avoid creating a footer, given the complexity of the header (not a critique). One threshold question is: do the T&C's need to be discoverable or visible? If discoverable, then I would place it under 'Help', because: Most of the header tabs are, appropriately, scoped for business flows. The two tabs that are "out of flow" ...


3

From a usability standpoint, yes. Efficiency dictates that you use implied agreement. From a legality perspective, no. You should explicitly ensure users are aware of what they are agreeing to. Explicit agreements are generally enforceable. These are usually in the form of checking a box that says you agree, or by clicking a button that says you agree. ...


3

I'd ask this question a company lawyer. I saw some applications (for example, Eclipse) ask user to accept all licenses separately. Probably, this is due to country law prohibits signing multiple documents with a single signature. Multiple agreements are placed into different pages or tabs of a form.


3

Three things first but many more to come, depending on your requirements. Cluster your text. Divide the text in to digestible chunks. You could extract the gist out of one page / paragraph (like this) and use it as a preview. Then link that preview to the complete content of that page / paragraph. Provide search options. Linguee for example shows the ...


3

This previous UX SE question on affordances for scrolling might be helpful. Maybe you could size the line-height and the window height so that half a line of text is visible as a visual clue that there's more to read. Or provide a link to a separate page with the full terms? You'll have to ask a lawyer what's required to keep yourself from being legally ...


3

The goal of a TOS document is legal protection. A plain text / HTML document does this better than a PDF document, so there is little (if any) benefit to including a PDF version. The UX question should really be about making the TOS more human (rather than lawyer) readable, as that is an area where most sites can improve a lot.


3

This really is a legal issue as much as it is a UX one. Explicit consent / agreement is the only type that holds up in court. Putting the license in a text document and stating something like "by installing this software you are agreeing to the license" without the user having to explicitly accept it or check a box stating that they have accepted it, ...


2

Following could be tried -- Give points or coupons (redeemable) to user for answering a questionnaire (something like "How-well-do-you-know-app" quiz) on these policy documents -- Give some sort of certificate of expertise (which they can use as a credential) to users who can answer them and how well they answer, for example there could a certificate ...


2

I am just going to throw that in there, as I cannot actually say any of this with confidence or base this on any factual knowledge. My guess is that they want to circumvent liability, that is, nowadays it is so common to skip these agreements that chances are (again I am not a lawyer, I am completely out of my depth here) somebody is actually going to be ...


2

If you're designing a system for a commercial organisation, it is likely that you will have to include a way to ensure the user accepts the terms & conditions, privacy policy, and maybe other legal stuff as well. Depending on the director / legal advisor / whoever signs it off, the interpretation of how this should be displayed is going to differ, and ...


1

since you say you're running a UK website, the best reading you can do is on the ICO (which is among the better agencies worldwide when it comes to guidance imho). You'll find pretty much all the answers you need. If you don't want to spend too much time educating yourself, you might be interested in the work I'm doing at iubenda, where we create software ...


1

I get really annoyed when an error causes a page reload which wipes out other things I entered unrelated to the error. So I recommend you remember what the user had typed or checked.


1

I disagree to a few answers here suggesting you should probably have the ToS and Privacy Policy as a separate button that opens a new activity or page for the users. Since every app is different and if your application's policy is important to know to the consumer for their knowledge and your business, it's crucial that you need to show it to them before ...


1

TL;DR Disregard the popup dialog. Put this somewhere in user sign-up/registration. Just to elaborate on the idea of popping up dialog may obstruct your user's goal. This is true. And you can handle this in two steps. You can make something like this in your "Terms & Condition": By using this app, user agrees to all of the following: blablabla ...


1

Strictly speaking, from a UX perspective, it is easier to click a button than to check a box AND click a button. Whether it is easier/more engaging to just display the text, or to require the user to check a box, is a secondary question here. The more important question is whether there is anything important in the TOS that they need to know before agreeing....


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