17

There isn't really a standard or convention that define these terms, but there's some sense in how these often differ. Flow First, the term flow denotes a non-linear path, i.e. one that branches. Then, flow in UX denotes through the system. Meaning that the analysis makes use of the system templates (either existing or those of the design). Task Flows A task ...


12

Here's what I think regarding your questions, one by one. 1- When is it appropriate to tell users that "this may take time"? I plan on displaying a confirmation modal with their list of content and a message. FYI: There is no way to show an exact completion time, but a range is possible. A good analogy is to think about it is to imagine the product owner ...


11

Task flows are a tool to help us think through the design before a feature is actually developed. They allow us to interject the user into the flow of the application and determine if the conceptual model agrees with the user model. Task flow is in relation to the activity flow within the application. Customer journey maps are documents that visually ...


9

Having to spend time registering when all they want to do is actually shop distracts the user from their main task and makes them more likely to not want to use it. Also think about what information the user needs to provide when registering and to be honest they will need to provide the same information if they want to get things delivered and paid for ...


9

The system is clear and it certainly will work. The only thing to note is that customer B might have less probability than initial A to go, because he might have done other plans. So instead of B being auto-confirmed maybe B should have a period of time to confirm. If he doesn't confirm in that period of time the opportunity passes to C. Another ...


6

Workflow is a set of steps to reach the goal. It's a general term (Workflow). In UX field you can see both terms Task flow and User flow are used mostly interchangeable. For me Task Flow is a good name for the results of Task Analysis technique. At the same time the results of the User Analysis techniques (in narrow sense) are User Models, Persons, but not ...


6

Just read this (rather brief) article: http://www.uie.com/articles/three_hund_million_button/ It's about an e-commerce site that was dropping customers due to the registration thing. In brief, passing the customers through a registration track as part of the checkout ... well, you see the article's title. Some users mumbled that they didn't were there to ...


6

Well, it all depends. Each project has its particularities, you'll have different resources, time, budget and so on. There's always the temptation to do more and to over analyse to play safe, which of course increases times, and sometimes affecting the initial research because data is no longer accurate. What I mean with this is that your list and process ...


4

This is kind of a loose fit for UX (and SE). But there is some general value here ... Pending, in progress, and completed all look spot on for the message you're trying to convey. My concern would be open and cancelled in the context of task management. Concerns with your system Open in task terms is often thought of as "incomplete". I'm not sure how this ...


4

First you must stay as naïve as you can possibly be while you sit down with the system as it is and exercise it without recourse to documentation. Exercise all of its functions, to the extent that you can figure out what they are. Do the exercising systematically, and take copious notes about the difficulties you encounter, no matter what they are or how ...


4

The best solution would be having a button for the customer B to select an option stating "Notify me if a slot is available over cancellation" this helps customer B to book another slot at the same time and wait for any cancellation to occur. And there should be a minimum time to lock the cancellation process say 2-hours helps notify customer B that the ...


3

You have to work on your terminology. Good terminology helps to build the users mental model. "In progress": it can't get any more vague :-). What is happening here? Why does it take time? Is being uploaded, reviewed, pushed to all devices, ...? Find a better name and maybe you have to explain less. "available": available to whom? Publishing is also ...


3

Agreed with both of the above. If you look at traditional shopping sites, it is good practice to allow a guest checkout, and then prompt the user to register when they are done. This also allows the user to gain an overall impression of your site/service (hopefully positive!) so when they are asked to register they will be more willing to. Why do users have ...


3

I'd ask later. Some users might be turned-off by requiring to create an account without seeing if the app is something they would be interested in. Especially if the brand is not very well known. By asking later you have a chance to show them what you have to offer so they will see the value of registering.


2

Whether or not you need to decompose the task into so many levels depends on the task complexity or amount of content. There's also the classic depth-breadth tradeoff. In general with web apps, where you have large windows and slow page loads, you're better off with a few complex pages in a simple hierarchy than a lot of simple pages in a complex hierarchy. ...


2

I don't think an optimal number exists as each application is different, see this link short term memory and web usability. 4 levels of sub tabs (!) probably means that the Information Architect, if any, missed something. Multiple groups of nested tabs tells me that the application is overly descriptive instead of having been thought for what users are ...


2

I personally think you can show the user just one or two buttons at the time. Tasks have two states: not complete and completed. When the user hasn't completed the task yet only show them the button 'Do this now'. When they press this button change it's state and show the 'I've done this' button. There is no need for showing these buttons at the same time. ...


2

Consider Google Maps or Wikimapia. They have large map area and many objects there. You could use similar way to build interaction and layout. Some points to consider: Maximize working area with collapsing elements, like menu area, etc. Provide tools for quick access to objects. You could use an interactive list of objects which is linked with the objects ...


2

When deciding how to show the completed and skipped tasks, it is crucial to know how important this information is to the user. The more important this information is to the user, the more prominent it should be. If the information is less important to the user, it is more appropriate to have the information less obvious, taking up less real estate at first. ...


2

I think that you might be better off conveying both states of use differently. For example you can make the progress bar move accordingly with the step numbers but also bold/underline the currently viewed step. So if they get to step 3 and go back to Step 1 then Step 3 will still be orange but it will be obvious that Step 1 is currently being viewed. If ...


2

I always feel like introducing a significant change in the screen after a user has completed something makes it very clear that the user has completed something. Where as, not changing anything on the screen makes it feel like whatever I was trying to accomplish has not been done, because I am still looking at generally the same thing I was looking at before....


2

You could probably adapt a card-sorting tool to find out what sequence most people expected to do the tasks. Or you could build a couple of prototypes with alternate task flows and test those. A quicker way might be to look for similar workflows on competitor sites and test those with a tool like http://www.usertesting.com/. Or, as Steve suggested above, ...


2

This is a very broad question, but I will help guide you to an answer by providing some articles. The first, is from UX Pin here. It's a decent overview on how to create user flows. Next, you need a tool to create these flows and wireframes. You can sketch with pen and paper, use illustrator, omnigraffle, keynote, sketch, etc to create these flows and ...


2

It's all in the placement. It would be best to have the submit button positioned below the Course Date option, because this is the typical logical reading order that implies the date should be set before the submit button is clicked. I would also suggest putting a tooltip on the disabled submit button - as soon as the user hovers over the disabled button, ...


2

The current de-facto standard is an immediately-visible (i.e. large) asterisk next to each mandatory field, with a lead-in explanation that the starred items are required. Given that this app is for the use of teachers, it can be accommodated on one page, e.g. (this has not been prettified):


2

Your overall strategy should be to be curious, ask a lot of questions from different stakeholders in the company and how they work with the product. find out how these people contribute to the product. and their day to day work with the product. In terms of the product itself, put yourself in the shoes of a user and use the product(s) thoroughly. Do it as a ...


2

I agree that this seems like a service design issue. If technically possible, you could add an interface where the user can schedule a call with customer service. This would at least give the user a slightly more convenient option than a "we can't help you, call us" dead end. An even better option would be a way to continue by email support option or ...


1

One thing I have noticed about the addition of the nested replies feature in Facebook is that it has fragmented conversations. (Partly also because Facebook hides half the comments.) So, on a post about a controversial issue, I have ended up answering the same objection from three different people who haven't read the rest of the comments. I liked the old ...


1

Removing steps removes complexity, it does not simplify the process. If the process you're creating is complicated, making it go from 7 steps to 5 may not fix the issue. I used to believe the same, that removing steps is the best practice, but it isn't always the case, especially in complex user transactions. There are a few things worth considering: Are ...


1

Since selecting a record to edit comes before actually editing the record, put the list at the top of the screen. Users tend to look for first steps near the top. Also, batch edits tend to confuse users. I've tried lots of times and never gotten satisfactory results. Better to keep the editing event small scale; a single record, not a session of editing ...


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