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Yes, it is the same with iOS and the tab bar should be visible everywhere. Don't hide a tab bar when people navigate to different areas in your app. A tab bar enables global navigation for your app, so it should remain visible everywhere. (Source)


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You're referring to the Doherty Threshold. The "rule" about <400ms that came from the Doherty & Thadani research paper was around productivity. So if your app is very task-based and about facilitating user productivity as much as possible, then good to stick to <400ms. But if your app is more exploratory and content-based, probably fine to increase ...


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Have you considered doing a segmented control nav design instead? That seems to me the more common solution to this kind of problem: https://developer.apple.com/design/human-interface-guidelines/ios/controls/segmented-controls/ As for answers to your questions: Is this [collapsed] pattern a good idea for a mobile web app? Is it unexpected enough to result ...


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With this design direction you are following a desktop homepage pattern of hotspots/cards and left nav that take you to the same place. This works as long as your cards can give you high level information that is relevant to the user. If you have no way of doing this, then hide the tab nav at the bottom until the user has made their first selection. Then ...


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Yes, if you think it is useful. Then the tabbar should probably have a tab for your dashboard. Let's name it Dashboard or Home (no, it's a bad idea). It looks a bit overcomplicated. Are you sure you need Profile circle to be shown all the time? The app looks like a phone app, and users usually don't pass their phones to other people (and they know how their ...


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