124

Rumors of its death are greatly exaggerated ✞... Classic hierarchical folder views aren't dying. But they are being complemented by other ways of viewing and interacting with files. The key trend here is the decoupling of views from the underlying file system. The old world...One truth ⇨ One view Historically, file UX was heavily tied to the underlying ...


50

It's not dying completely, but it is becoming a power user niche feature. Everyone has seen or heard stories about the user who stores everything on their desktop or in a single My Documents folder. Humans are terrible at justifying a large upfront cost like creating and managing dozens of folders just for a possible, small benefit in the future like being ...


15

Most people tend to think that certain aspects of technology die away, but I always get the feeling that it is far more common for it to "sediment". Whenever I see a new trend, it usually never ends like "this is the new best way". Normally it is more like "we solved this problem with one global solution, but now it seems there are different solutions for ...


15

Categorization of content is still very important, even after the rise of smartphones. Whether that's by date, by location, or by tags. The more and more popular use of smartphones since 2007 has forced designers to come up with simpler user experiences. Manually putting stuff in folders can usually be considered a bad UX experience, which is why in a lot ...


11

I'm not so sure there's a huge difference from a UX stand-point. If anything, it makes it more difficult. Let's say a user is on your site and is at www.sub.example.com/articles/article-title.php, and he wants to go to your homepage. Users often clear the address bar, so he would click in the address bar, clear the end of the URL, and be left at www.sub....


11

Probably. But it's a slow painful death. It essentially boils down to the need to put something somewhere where we can find it again, or where we can direct someone else to finding it. We are naturally predisposed to putting things in containers or compartmentalizing in such a way that even if it's a long time before we come back then we can still have a ...


8

You're trying to create a nested master-detail-detail relationship, which is often difficult to accomplish in general. But your main problem here is visual, the relationships aren't visualized well because all three levels share the same BG color, which makes it seem like they're all "top-level". If you give the "details" panes the same BG color as the ...


8

Search helps if you know what you are looking for (obvious). If you don't know what you are looking for, a folder structure can help you find it. For example, if you are looking for a recipe for chicken Florentine, search will help you find it, or if you have chicken and want a recipe that uses it, search may help there too. But if you just want to cook ...


7

The mental model attempts to define a map of the user cognitive processes. Depending on how it's done it can help define what is the user looking for, what kind of decisions is she taking etc. In my experience mental models serve more as a framework to refer to as one explores different possibilities. The mental model itself does not deliver specific design ...


6

The problem I'm seeing is that your CTA button is so far away from the icon and headline that they don't seem related. Move the "Get Started" button close to the "Scan bar code" and you should eliminate the "white space" issue.


5

Thematically, a subdirectory is clearly part of the main site. A subdomain is an area that may be related to the main site, but doesn't really fit as part of the main site. There's no hard rules for what goes where, it is dependant on how content/functionality is being organized and who is doing it. The benefit of the subdomain approach is that it can be ...


5

All the examples you have quoted are examples of parallax sites which use shifting content to tell and story and keep the user engaged.I am going to break this response into three parts. The reasoning I would recommend looking at this article for additional inputs on how parallax sites keep users engaged. Storytelling Parallax scrolling offers ...


5

As tools (software and hardware) increase in speed, the value of search begins to eclipse the value of a folder structure as a way to find a file. On my PC, my MacBook, and my phone, it's simply faster to search for items by terminology rather than seek it out visually. Most file systems still need a folder structure, so it's not dying, it's just that ...


5

Folder structure is not dying However, its importance and prevalence in the average user's interface is. The truth is that a user will find the path of least resistance to accomplish their desired task. With this in mind, maintaining folder structure would have to become their desired task. For the average Joe, nope! The average person has become ...


5

Tree view is often complicated and counter-intuitive to the users, but it has several strong advantages: full names which are unique identifiers I mean, if I access a file named /etc/passwd I know I access a particular file. There is no way I get /home/backup/passwd instead. Tags don't give you this garantee: if you have found exactly one object tagged ...


4

Maybe more true thing to say would be that concept of folder structure as file organizing strategy is dying. Or maybe more true: organizing files/documents is becoming more and more automated. If we have concept of categories and one file can be in two categories then I would really dislike doing manual organization. Therefore all these new technologies use ...


4

I have not encountered an issue like that before, but I have encountered a more malicious experience that is similar. We had several websites that were taking our eCommerce product images and linking them to provide product images for their own website. (Hotlinking for those of you who are familiar with the term.) In your case, you have benevolent ...


4

It could have also been done because the other two options are preferred. For the example you gave, perhaps paying with a credit card or paypal only took 2% off the top of the payment while paying through Amazon might have taken 5% or more. It would be beneficial to the site owner (but not the user) if the user went through the trouble of making a new ...


4

In my experience, once you know which tasks your user must complete, you can then define your task flows. With task flows you can figure out which pages you need on your site. You also figure out what goes on each page & how everything is grouped together on the page. Then you can start to define how the various pages are linked together, which ...


4

[...] my goal was to eliminate the network shared structure. It'll help to center the goal around a clear pain point. You mentioned issues of 'g-drive' but the top two issues (length of the file path and storage space) are technical and not related to usability. From your description I think it's getting to the right information quickly that's the biggest ...


3

Here is a good article regarding duplication in UX. One of the main points they make is in line with why I think it is a bad idea: With more possible links or actions, there is a higher risk of confusing the user. By duplicating content, you are unnecessarily complicating your UI / UX I would argue that if you are putting the same link under two different ...


3

1) Horizontal sub-navigation One solution may be to separate those items which require more context (like the prior selection of a customer or supplier), into a seperate level of navigation. One representation being a horizontal sub-navigation. This would allow you to have some tabs in the sub-navigation depend on selecting a customer (like 'Profile' and '...


3

My suggestion is to avoid having these context-dependent items in the menu in the first place. The items are especially confusing because they lead to different places depending on who was selected last in your search. What should the navigation look like, then? You can take inspiration from a number of sources. Amazon, Google Play, Etsy, Gmail, and others ...


3

Most e-commerce websites I have used over the years assume the user reads from top to bottom and left to right so the CTA would work on the right depending on the region the website is aimed at. EDIT: Figure B would be the option to use. The user has already reviewed their items in the basket so the important area is the delivery information and this would ...


3

It all depends on the user need that you are trying to satisfy. Is the product going to be used for scheduling/time management? Is it going to help anyone if there is no time/location set? Does the user use anything else for setting up meetings and this app that you are building serves another purpose ? In order to make a good decision you should find out if ...


2

Every design decision should be justified by either empirical or logical means (which are ideally based on previous research and empirical testing) . Surely if you think your design is better, you have a way of arguing it? As far as site maps are concerned, analytics is an invaluable resource for their design. User testing is the next thing to do to affirm ...


2

For me the layouts of both the pages are slightly confusing. Employees>Doctors is a bad header as it contains a bit distractive extra data: Employees. Also it seems like the page Doctors encloses Doctors, Physicians, Nurses and Technicians sections. Because header describes the page content and all the sections are below the header. Also the header ...


2

I think a lot of it depends on how you developed and verified this mental model. If you derived it and tested it with users, it will give the user a framework with which to understand and predict your system instead of requiring the user to wrap their head around your system, on your system's terms. This can be especially true if your system's information ...


2

Each website should get its own host. Website? A collection of webpages that share a design (e.g., header and footer) and main navigation. Host? A registered name, e.g.: example.com, www.example.com, sub.example.com, sub.sub.example.com. This is not a technical requirement (!), but I think it’s an assumption that many users have (at least those with a ...


2

Sometimes this is done for speed / scale. Only code is loaded for what is considered the primary options. When you click the more then more stuff is downloaded and more code is loaded. I get this is UX and the UX answer is don't want to wait for more. The reality is that is takes time to transfer data and load code.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible