30

The short answer to the high level UX question here is -- it depends -- so here are a few cases why a company like discourse might choose to put click counters next to their hyperlinks along with things to watch out for... I'm new here what does everyone else click? Sometimes when I visit a new restaurant I'll ask the waiter what most people order. This ...


19

According to, literally, the first result when you google discourse click count, Jeff Atwood defends the click counter as a valuable signal for users to determine if a link is worth clicking: The purpose of links is to be clicked, their entire existence is predicated on being clicked at some point, and showing the click data gives you, THE READER, ...


19

I have dealt with this question many times, and it's all a question of cost effectiveness. You should ask yourself: do the X% additional users that use IE 6-8 worth the Y% additional development cost? In order to answer that question, you will also have to determine how costly it is to support every browser version, considering the fact that some ...


12

I have used the following listing to justify a minimum of 320 wide: http://viewportsizes.com/ While it's not completely exhaustive, it's expansive enough to make the point that there are only a few phones in the last few years that have <320px screens, and I have never had anyone argue that the number isn't de minimis. If you're doing this for ...


10

Part of the answer may be dependent on market segment. If you're targeting Asia, you'll need to skew toward older versions of IE. Likewise for users that have overbearing IT departments that are behind the times. As with everything else UX related, find users that match your segment and ask them about their technology. Way better than assuming. Barring ...


9

Case 1: A user might have set their browser to automatically allow Geo Location to be sent to websites making a request to obtain it. Case 2: A user might have set it to "ask for permission" i.e. when a site tries to get the user's geo data he gets a pop-up. In Case 1: A user would never know the website recorded his geo-location, while in Case 2: A user ...


7

I don’t know any general studies about it, and I guess it would be very hard to come up with a sensible one. I think it’s safe to assume that this very, very much depends on a) target group and b) URL design. So even if users regularly manipulate URLs, this doesn’t mean that they do it on every site, because often the URL design is not good, i.e., the URLs ...


7

When building a website for a client, I'd like to be able to sell the extra cost of making the website screen reader friendly. The problem is trying to sell it as an extra cost. A properly built web site is, by default, screen reader (and, as such, also search engine) friendly. As for your actual question, the National Federation of the Blind has several ...


6

It's very simple: social proof. People are more persuaded when they know many others have traveled the same way. This click counter is very prominent in Like buttons, to serve the same purpose:


6

To answer the askers question, it looks like we have to use a little deduction. Nobody seems to collect these statistics outright. Someone wrote a very detailed article as to why. There are 326 million people in the US (source) 88.5% of the US population uses the Internet (source) 2.3% of the US population have visual impairment (soruce) 54% of those that ...


6

No. Always allow the user to opt-in. You could prompt the user the first time the app is ran, with a message explaining why it would be a great idea for them to join, but I would default off. Automatic opt in causes the PERCEPTION of your app to be "shady" for some people. This perception has a big influence on the total UX. And what's more - this can, ...


6

IE8 or not IE8 What I've found is that various shims and the usage of widespread web frameworks means that support for IE9 and above is fairly easy. IE8, on the other hand is a completely different story, and many framework have or about to phase out support for it. The usage statistics chart looks like this [source]: And as you can see, IE8 and below ...


5

I think your answer lies in your question, also it may only be 5% of traffic, but who are those users? I would find that out before ignoring them. My employer's main traffic comes from desktops due to the nature of what it publishes online (large documents). However the site is designed to be mobile responsive for ease of use on such a platform. Although ...


4

The answer is quite simple. This kind of data ("number of users", "number of posts", "number of sales" etc.) are used as social proof to drive sales/sign ups to your product. It is much easier to trust something that is used by millions of people, right? For example Tumblr emphasizes the most crucial data for their micro-blogging platform, the number of ...


4

horizontal bar chart for portrait layout and vertical bar chart forlandscape layout


4

If the better thing to show is the median, show the median and call it the median. If they don't know what it is, they probably won't appreciate the difference anyway. If they do know what it is, they'll appreciate you clarifying you mean median and not mean. If they don't know that a median is a type of average, they probably aren't mathy enough to really ...


4

I can only relate to one of the gurus of UX (even if sometimes I don't agree) : Once again, responsive design is not about “mobile”, “tablet”, and “desktop”. It’s about creating experiences meant to look and function beautifully on anything that can access the Web. Brad Frost source : http://bradfrost.com/blog/post/future-friendly-fruition/ But anyway, ...


4

Spider graphs – radar graphs – are useful to show players statistics better than bars. The best is when they are used for data comparison, because you can visualize the shape of a player. The only problem I see, is that usually for a player you have different data to show with different units measures. In this case the data should be normalized in order to ...


4

When deciding what browsers not to support, understanding who's using the application, what the application is and where and when it will be used should provide a good starting point. 1. Who? Understanding your demographic will give you some insight into what kinds of devices and browsers they may have access to. Income, age and profession will all give ...


4

If you want to visualize just the total wins and losses any simple chart or table will do. If you want to visualize the progress throughout the season though, what you have is similar to Edward Tufte's sparklines visualizing wins and losses using simple icons. The stars work ok, but it takes a bit more work to distinguish between wins and losses. Here Tufte ...


3

Your table is very hard to follow, you're putting most of the visual encoding into stuff which isn't carrying data. Tufte's concept of data ink is useful here. Because you've got so much non-data-ink it's very hard to scan your table and get a sense quickly of what the current state of play is. If you're going to use color to encode information (green for ...


3

I would say another way to word your request is potentially "Number of active (legally) blind computer users globally" Or maybe you can combine stats yourself, global computer users + global counts of the visually impaired. That being said, you should always code to make your site accessible by the greatest number of users, unless you can somehow guarantee ...


3

I think that this question is multi-faceted, and that there is no single answer to it. On a basic level, I think it's important to remember that the easiest and safest course of action for the user is to say "no". To get them to say "yes" (and I strongly believe that giving such information needs to be opt-in and not opt-out), there are many things that ...


3

I think it would benefit the user to be able to create the chart using a blank canvas, in a WYSIWYG format wherever possible. This way there is something tangible to think about right away, rather than having to select from potentially confusing options ("statistics"?). On the "canvas" there are two main areas to start: the chart box and the legend. In the ...


3

The question for me is here: Can you define key metrics for success? I do not think that there is a formula (at least I know none) that tells me "The interface works great!". Usually, the question is about segments, cohorts & success metrics. For example: Assuming your page is a product page and you want to measure how often in the 10 visits users ...


3

Why Statistics? Once you get beyond graphs, averages, and percents, the bulk of statistics concerns answering the question, “Is this sample size big enough to convince me that what I see in the sample actually applies in general?” This branch of statistics is called “inferential statistics.” It’s definitely worth knowing and doing inferential statistics ...


3

It honestly depends on the type of work you are completing for your website. You might be testing a new design out, just to see if your new design is usable. Or you could be completing A/B tests, which are tests that are conducted to compare two similar designs to see which is more successful. Another thing you might do is benchmark your existing website, ...


2

Website statistics and analytics is the only driver for commercial sales price. There is almost nothing else as simple as "Visitors" to work with. Because of that, websites that don't sell products need to show number of visitors, no of clicks, no of unique users by hour, day and month. The more visitors, clicks, unique users you got, the higher the sales ...


2

When posing a question for a poll, the exact wording can have a significant impact on the choices that people make. So any change to a poll question, essentially invalidates the existing votes. E.g. "Do you enjoy eating chocolate?" vs. "Do you like chocolate?" while being essentially the same question will likely result in a different bias. The same goes ...


2

Your two examples make it obvious that question editing should reset the results, but I can imagine less dramatic changes to a question where you not want to reset the results. For example, if choice #2 had been misspelled as "Oatmael" in the original version of the voite and then corrected by an edit, the previously collected votes would not necessarily ...


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