130

If I saw that in an interface - I would assume only one item can be checked, especially before any had been selected. Only the wording of the title would indicate to me that multiple selection is possible. I think this design would lead to a greater than normal number of people choosing a single item rather than a selection of items. I don't see the benefit ...


62

A number of issues factor into the perception of what a kilobyte is and how to word it. The IEC standard names are useless: As Jeff Atwood notes there is simply no industry acceptance of KiB/MiB/GiB. Hard drive manufacturers and Macs are the only major players using the 1000 bytes definition and hard drive manufacturers have absolutely no incentive to ...


53

I would keep the message short and simple, "Unfortunately, iPhone devices do not support W3C standard HTML video" This still allows you to shift the blame "devices don't support our application" as opposed to "we don't support your device". Why not longer? If you go in to details about how Apple refuses to follow standards and how you guys have tried ...


50

That depends on the context. A checkbox that makes the user accept terms of agreement for example should be unchecked since its a critical decision which needs the users interaction to be legally okay. On non-critical checkboxes you can pre-select them according to what most users want/need. If 80% of your users hit the checkbox you can pre-select that ...


39

A checkbox should look like a box and not a circle. They are not check circles, after all. Subtly rounded corners, as others have mentioned, would be okay, but user interfaces have always represented a checkbox as a square and a radio button as a circle. The designers behind your examples are likely trying to be different, favoring style over function.


34

If truly nothing can be done to make something work for iPhone users. Then be honest as possible in your notice saying the app is not supported, and succinctly provide the reason why, and how the user can get around it. Here's a quote from an article on medium about error messages that applies equally well for your use case. Write an alert message that ...


31

Where is the best place to ask the user their ethnicity? Honestly -- in the doctors office. Unless the benefit to the user is clear then don't ask for it. You wanting to keep track for your own records isn't clear benefit to the user. If it turns out that a user sees value in telling you their ethnicity (like in a doctor's office due to ethnic related ...


27

A checkbox should be square. As Cooper, Reimann, and Cronin wrote in About Face 3 (emphasis mine): Traditionally, checkboxes are square. Users recognize visual objects by their shape, and the square checkbox is an important standard. There is nothing inherently good or bad about squareness; it just happens to have been the shape originally chosen ...


24

Pre selection of checkboxes Successful pre-selections can make interface more efficient and pleasurable to use. Sane default selections can reduce the amount of actions a user needs to perform. Whether or not a checkbox should be preselected should be based on the domain context and business rules. Business rules will dictate whether something should be ...


23

There is a question you need to answer (which can be stated in different ways): How big is your dataset? Is "everything" a finite set? Is it sensible that the user might want to see everything? If your dataset is small or finite, or it's sensible that the user would be able to deal with everything, then you could return everything. If your dataset is ...


20

HTTP error codes are primarily useful for support and debugging. In the early days of the internet, almost all users were technical, and so having them made a lot of sense. Today, it still makes sense having them visible, but that should not be the only information that you provide. Explain it like a human for the rest of the world to understand what ...


18

You can just put the word recommended in brackets, and/or italicized and/or in a lighter shade to differentiate it from the main label. But the important thing is that you communicate to the user why it's recommended. You know why, but the user will probably not, so stick a little linked why? in there too. The user is much more likely to fill in what is ...


17

An old (now deleted) Stack Overflow question covered exactly this. The consensus was: 1 kB = 1000 bytes 1 KiB = 1024 bytes The source for this was the NIST reference on SI units. I would use the more technically correct KiB. In other words, divide the number of bytes by 1024 and show that with KiB as the unit. I doubt it's important if users mistakenly ...


15

For starters I recommend looking at this excellent article from UX Matters which talks about how to extend Jesse James Garret’s visual vocabulary to reflect rich interactive applications which recommends highlighting the interactions as synchronous (requiring a page load)and asynchronous (happening within the page). To quote the article For user ...


15

I did a quick check on how Google and Bing handle this and their flow is to just ignore the search request if there is no search value entered and keep the user in the same page. While that does make sense since the user might be confused if search results are contrary to what he expected and if he gets some random results he might be confused as in his ...


15

I'd like to suggest a 3rd solution which avoids the need for figuring out an appropriate default value altogether. In this case, I would actually not use a checkbox, because you can have multiple values here and not really a clear default value. In addition, you can technically have 3 options here, and a checkbox isn't adequate in that scenario: Never ...


13

I believe this application (Skype) and many other communication type applications including instant-messengers, email clients and other VOIP apps, hi-jack the "X" button to minimize the more user-frustrating event of accidentally ending a users communication session. In many cases, users might simply want to get the application of the screen, the fastest and ...


13

A stands for Accent. They are colors that accent the primary colors. Here's what Google says: UI Color Application Choose your palette Limit your choice of colors by choosing three color hues in the primary and one accent color in the secondary palette. The accent color may or may not need fall back options. Accent color The vibrant accent ...


13

If it makes sense in your case, you could use informal wording, like Trello does. Also, while average user won't know what W3C or standards are, they usually have heard of HTML5 and/or it's video. Sadly, we're not allowed to make nice things with HTML5 video on iPhone It works fine on iPad or many other devices, though!


11

The default behavior is to go to the previous screen no matter what it is. If you're deep in the menu then it takes you up a level. If you're in the top level of a menu it takes you back to the application. If you're in the main screen of an application it takes you either to the desktop or to the app, from which you launched the current one (e.g. from ...


11

hello from Singapore :) Using NRIC to login is is more common in more government related internet services like taxes. Also it might be useful to note that almost 1/3 of the singapore population are foreigners. There's something called Singpass which is very common for signing into government services, which both foreigners and locals have. For more ...


10

There isn't any, because "computer proficiency" is a vague term. Is a programmer more computer proficient than a secretary who can lay out a colorful document in Word? Something as vague as computer proficiency cannot be measured and therefore cannot be part of a useful research question. So, you need to make your proficiency test specific to the thing you'...


10

That's kind of oldschool. We like to say "Never touch a running system" but violations against this doctrine are the fuel of progress. Personally, I have also used a 2 column website where the footer was only displayed at the left (ca. 40% width) site and no one had a problem with it. The reason why this is done seem to be the familiarity. But I also have ...


10

You should consider kicking the people out of your team that think "arrow down" should increase the number from 0 to 1. Of course arrow up should increase and arrow down should decrease, i don't understand how someone would argue that. You can use "+" and "-" to make it more obvious though.


9

This is a good question. I've been wandering if there is a better way to document interactions for over a year now and have been trialling a few different things. I've taken inspiration from a lot of different places and below are the different types of methods I've created/trialled in the past with some success. The images below show interaction with an ...


9

Update: Is it legitimate to ask for ethnicity or Race? As all UX answers go: It depends, but there are at least two main areas where asking for ethnicity is absolutely fine: For Medical Reasons: For Obvious medical reasons to assess risk factors for both insurers or as part of doctor patient interactions. For less obvious medical reasons, for example: ...


8

The round "boxes" implies that it's a different graphical representation of a radio button. A confusing one. Whether or not that is the case, I do not know without reading the context. Rounded boxes is one thing, but circles are not as helpful as they could be as they use the visual language of a different widget that is close enough in functionality to ...


8

I'm not sure about affective (did you mean "effective"?), but we can definitely identify a common, even standard, design pattern for one-product websites. Here are a few examples: Square, Doxie, Feedly, Highlight, Dollar Shave Club. As far as I understand, the main principles for one-product websites are: Product in front - These websites use big images ...


8

I've watched users struggle to find the right-aligned arrow like the second example. I think it's because: it is very far from the title it is all alone, and small (hard to spot) sometimes, it is off the edge of the window or even the screen. In contrast, when it is near the title, people have a much easier time finding the control (whether it is > or [...


8

It depends on who "the user" is. HTTP error codes are definitely cryptic and unhelpful to users using a browser. Different web servers will each have their way of displaying these pages, with varying levels of user-friendliness out of the box. In most cases web developers can override these, but many times this will only be done for the most common ...


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