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35

I know some people advocate introducing a deliberate delay after certain actions in order to make it feel like some sort of processing has happened. Consider a 'save' function for example. Even if the system is able to save changes almost instantly without delay, introducing an artificial delay may well instil confidence in the user that their changes really ...


31

As you've pointed out, forcing speed and progress into one fixed-length bar -- per the Microsoft example -- reveals the inherently non-linear relationship between time and progress :) But more importantly for your project: make sure you understand your user and determine your motivation before jumping in. What is the purpose of your progress bar in this ...


15

You can overlay your progress bar with a transfer rate graph pegged to 100% width. The result is a constantly updating histogram that remains linear throughout the operation. This gives you a simple way to display both progress and transfer rate on the horizontal axis. An example: This is a rough visual example; to make it more readable you'd want to ...


14

I'm assuming this question was incited by: How and when should you use animation in your application? I definitely do believe that if loading time cannot be improved, distraction is a good technique. Examples: github.com , as well as the popularity of having interlaced .png's. Maybe the term "distracting" would only apply to stuff below 750ms, and after ...


14

Q: How many images must be in a carousel so that the user can see all of it? A: 1 In an interesting blog post about carousel interaction stats, Eric Runyon collected data on carousel interactions for various ND.edu web pages. What he found is that effectively users only interact with the first item in the carousel: A concise analysis of this data:


13

Time is only one of the factors that affect whether an app feels responsive. However there are decent guidelines that give you a rough idea of how people perceive response. Jakob Nielsen has written a good article on Response times that I use as a rough guide. It states that: 0.1 second is about the limit for having the user feel that the system is ...


12

There is no most important factor in mobile applications, as each application has to make different tradeoffs in order do develop the best UX. It is however one of the more critical factors as it directly impacts almost every application. Other factors that may be more important are: aesthetics; correctness; simplicity; and similarity to known patterns.


12

They are trying to include two separate statistics in the graph. The left to right is the % progress, and the graph shows transfer rate (with the black bar showing the average). For most people this is overkill, and for most situations a simple progress bar is fine. However this only shown when you ask for 'more details', and so that is what you are ...


11

There is a significant body of work in the field of neuroscience which suggests that the human brain is highly adapted to the process of recognizing faces. In fact, the activity is so specialized, it's suspected that the brain has a region, the fusiform face area, devoted solely to that task. A classic work on the subject is Face-Specific Processing in the ...


11

How about Pacman? Surely with computing power these days, you could speed the ghosts and yellow chomper to Superman-like speeds, but then the game would only be fun for those who can click faster than a speeding bullet. The general rule is that any time you are simulating a graphical interaction or sequence, you must know your audience and render that ...


10

Yes, there are studies that claims that Dvorak is faster than QWERTY. (But you'll also find other studies that claims otherwise.) Dvorak It's based on total finger movement that is needed to write common English words. So the Dvorak layout has the most frequently used characters on the middle row, and the rarely used ones on the top and bottom row. Ergo, ...


9

If you are already used to a QWERTY keyboard and you feel that the benefit of changing (which doesn't include speed) will be worth the time taken, as well as not easily being able to use someone else's keyboard, then you should take a look at the Colemak layout. It has fewer changes from QWERTY than Dvorak, and keeps the position of many of the shortcut ...


8

Actually, the "perceived time" is the important subjective UX factor. But since UX and usability also embraces objective factors (such as effectiveness), slow performance can per definition decrease the UX/usability. One example of such illogical "perceived time" tasks is the installation process of 5 floppy discs vs the installation with a CD-ROM. ...


8

If you are looking for the fastest way for experts to enter the data, you should focus on keyboard entry with keyboard navigation. I would rename Alpha and Beta to "Alpha (1-5)" and "Beta (1-5)", and make them text entry areas restricted to the numbers 1-5. You should have some sort of client side validation to ensure that no other numbers are used. I ...


8

As Marcos Ciarrocchi correctly pointed out,what users are more concerned about is the perceived time which it takes for your site or app to load than the actual time . To quote this interesting article which states that users are more concerned about how well and how quickly they can get a task then then worry about the initial load: When we began our ...


8

This graph indicates that for half of the total transfer time, the file was copied at half the speed Actually, that graph would look more like this. This graph indicates that for the first 2/3rds of the progress - ie. for the first 2/3rds of the file - the file transferred at full speed, then dropped to half-speed. Thus, it is not "time" on the X-axis, ...


6

The users really care only about the perceived time, which is not often the same as the actual loading time. In that sense "distractions" are just another form of feedback, just like the progress bars and loading animations, but they reduce the perceived time to load. The Github example is really good and if you take a closer look you'll see that in the end ...


6

If at all possible, have a profile pictures and names together. Profile pictures and names serve fairly different purposes, but they are most useful when used together. Lets say I know someone's name from emailing them, but not what they look like. If there is a meeting, and I want to be able to recognise them, I need to see a face next to a name. If I ...


6

There is no way to answer that question in general. First, there is no single metric of "better". You could try to use some common metric like overall satisfaction, but maybe some other metric is more important to you, like user retention. We can't tell which one you need. Second, even if we were to agree on a single metric, the ways in which a negative UX ...


5

In short, no. Speed is important, and is part of making a mobile app usable, but if a user can't figure out how perform their desired task it doesn't matter how fast the app is.


5

It took me a while to understand where the problem is, because it is very subtle. The y axis is speed (bytes/sec), while the x axis is percent. In a usual time series plot, the x axis would be elapsed time. This is fine in many cases, since for a roughly constant transfer rate, percentage ~ time. Even if not, you can still infer two pieces of information: ...


5

Yes, you get to control the pace. It's a form of storytelling. Sometimes you don't want to roll everything out all at once. All of these pacing decisions need to be weighed against how much value those pauses in the action will deliver. Progressive disclosure: Maybe you can reduce or prevent errors by using progressive disclosure patterns. De-cluttering a ...


5

Personally I do not use carousels anymore. I/we used them till about 1 year ago in our e-commerce websites that our company makes for clients. Carousels are a nice to place a few products in a limited space, especially on mobile. We stepped away from them because a great looking hero image gave a better CTR / conversion rate. TL:DR 7 or 8 seconds based on ...


4

If my assumption is correct in my last set of questions. We might try two states for the same view. Basically, while the file is being downloaded - you get the standard progress only view, with the extra data of speed (right now), total time elapsed, and estimated total time. Once the file has completed transfer - if you have the bar expanded - the view ...


4

Bruce Tognazzini provides this guidance: Display a message indicating the potential length of the wait for any action that will take longer than 2 seconds. Communicate the actual length through an animated progress indicator. Offer engaging text messages to users informed and entertained while they are waiting for long processes, such as server ...


4

I'm intrigued by the question. However, there is one thing I haven't seen mentioned. Very often, the most stunning looking graphical decisions are an annoyance to the audience that does not expect it to be that stunning. For instance, when I first started with jQuery, I felt tempted to animate EVERYTHING I could find, menubars, dropdowns, loading gifs etc. ...


4

Some sites allow people choose between different versions of the site they want, one tailored for faster connections (AKA "broadband") and one for slower connections (AKA "dial-up"). I would default to the heavier "broadband" version because that's the majority but allow easy switching to the lighter version before any large data servings. Then make the ...


3

The question really is about fast vs. slow connections, which you will have to deal with. In many places mobile connection speeds are comprable to dialup, and considering the number of people on mobile connections, you should have some option for them. Just serve the mobile version of your website to customers on slow connections, but give them the option ...


3

I agree with John and Ben, but I would like to expand a bit their answers with a definition of usability given in the book Interaction design, by Rogers, Sharp, and Preece. Goals of usability: Effectiveness Efficiency (speed is related to it) Safety Utility Learnability Memorability I think that the success of a mobile app or any other interactive ...


3

The best option may be to do something in between. If you are showing the average rate for the last 5 seconds (or whatever amount of time works best for you), then you should minimize the jumpiness, while still reacting in a timely manner to large changes in speed. In your example, this method would show 4 MBps for the first few minutes, and would go down ...


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