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14

Q: How many images must be in a carousel so that the user can see all of it? A: 1 In an interesting blog post about carousel interaction stats, Eric Runyon collected data on carousel interactions for various ND.edu web pages. What he found is that effectively users only interact with the first item in the carousel: A concise analysis of this data:


6

There is no way to answer that question in general. First, there is no single metric of "better". You could try to use some common metric like overall satisfaction, but maybe some other metric is more important to you, like user retention. We can't tell which one you need. Second, even if we were to agree on a single metric, the ways in which a negative UX ...


6

Personally I do not use carousels anymore. I/we used them till about 1 year ago in our e-commerce websites that our company makes for clients. Carousels are a nice to place a few products in a limited space, especially on mobile. We stepped away from them because a great looking hero image gave a better CTR / conversion rate. TL:DR 7 or 8 seconds based on ...


5

Yes, you get to control the pace. It's a form of storytelling. Sometimes you don't want to roll everything out all at once. All of these pacing decisions need to be weighed against how much value those pauses in the action will deliver. Progressive disclosure: Maybe you can reduce or prevent errors by using progressive disclosure patterns. De-cluttering a ...


3

You (literally) can’t make the user wait There is no “magic message” that will keep users from putting their phones back in their pockets when they aren’t getting the info they want. Literally, they will not wait. Granted, network connectivity or “Lie-Fi” conditions are often beyond your control. The user may recognize this as well — but that will only make ...


3

Of course it is better to eliminate unnecessary elements on the interface. The big question is how much slower it would be if you implement those additional checks? In my opinion a several checks would not noticably slow down the interface so try to do it. If you have good developers you will find a way to optimize your code. Also, leaving the normal user ...


3

Don't slow down your page intentionally. Seriously... Don't. The average expected loading time of a page needs to be no more than 1s and that in itself is too long. If a page doesn't appear to be loading instantaneously, people will leave because nothing is showing up. Instead of attempting to get your fast pages to match your slow page, how about you do ...


3

Showing user immediate feedback is perfectly best idea but not when it is the reality. These are dark UX practices honestly. It is good to be honest rather than faking. Put up a message on the screen that "Hey hero, seems there is technical snag with your hand held, do not worry we will get this posted while you work with other stuffs, go ahead, carry on we ...


3

It bears being said: The reason to stick with it is because it is the standard, and standards are empowering. A 'browser' is a complex class creature. It includes screen readers and other systems for non-standard display. If you haven't read what Accessibility is about, check chapter 3 of the Government usability guidelines Remember that accessibility ...


3

The best option may be to do something in between. If you are showing the average rate for the last 5 seconds (or whatever amount of time works best for you), then you should minimize the jumpiness, while still reacting in a timely manner to large changes in speed. In your example, this method would show 4 MBps for the first few minutes, and would go down ...


2

I'm not sure there's a hard, fast color choice for a status indicator. Like most "rules", they are guidelines. Yet the biggest thing to keep in mind is the context of your product is what matters most. Are you already using blue a lot? For links? Background colors? Is it a core color to your color palette? If so, then you might want to consider using a ...


2

If you can do that, it's always a good step. Even better, if you can do asynchronous requests for those resources so you don't affect the normal and expected behaviour of your site, it's even better. But also, inform your users about the situation, may be not about the background download of elements, but the fact that you will be moving to a new server ...


2

Does it matter? I would say that as soon as the internet connection actually works, it is fine no matter how long it will take to download the necessary binaries. What is important is that the users gets feedback about this. E.g. current throughput (kbps), and some kind of progress indication which can be graphical and/or in text (xxxx Mbytes of total yyyy ...


2

Adding to previous answers, you could try to use MeteorJS if you are looking for a specific technology. MeteorJS as well as other JavaScript frameworks make use of "Data Reaction", this means that it loads all the templates only once and then it just focuses on submitting data to the server without needing to reload the page. To answer your question more ...


2

If there is just one status (or if each status has an appropriate label next to it) then the colour choice is irrelevant as long as the on and off status are easily distinguishable. When there are a number of different status you need to represent, green and red are not ideal colours due to colour accessible design. It would be pointless having an indicator ...


2

Instagram uses a similar model. It shows UI updates prior to there actually being a server-side update. http://www.fastcodesign.com/1669788/the-3-white-lies-behind-instagrams-lightning-speed excerpt: Instagram Always Pretends To Work What Instagram labels as “optimistic actions” really boil down to something far simpler: Always make it look like the service ...


2

I would suggest you should be focusing on the user journey and based on that with the kind of mental load the users have(while using the product), take your decision. In some cases providing unnecessary/useless/redundant options (buttons in your case) might dramatically increase the friction. No harm in cleaning up unless you are hiding useful things. ...


2

Do you feel like precise control speed are needed or nice to have? Why do you need playback that goes backwards? If it is for navigation trough the media wouldn't progress bar serve better? Dropdown [+] You don't have to worry about unreasonable high values [+] Easy to control on mobile devices [+] Takes less space [-] Less control over the playback speed ...


2

MB/s. That's the common way most people recognise download speed as. I believe service providers use Mbps because that's the speed they can guarantee 'to your front door'. After that it's up to you what you actually get (in MB/s) based on a lot of factors like router, cables, Wi-Fi strength and range.


2

I don't have any studies but the following thoughts: Dividing questions in multiple screens is not done to increase the felt speed to fill in information. It is done not to overwhelm the user with too much information. Every viewport should host only one question / step. This makes it clear to the user that she has not to scroll down in order to answer ...


2

Imagine you have all your question intupts in one form. Do they have any complex relations like mutual enable/disable logics or different ways to go depending on particular answer? If so, your current approach helps to hide form's complexity. Also, if you have device of limited screen size your approach avoid difficulties with scrolling and validation errors ...


2

I haven't found specific research about perceived speed for single-question, but it would be highly contextual and hard to generalize. The simplest way to decide this for your domain would be to create a prototype with both designs and test it on users. In the meantime I would recommend taking a look at Luke Wroblewski's insightful article about onboarding ...


1

I think a slider would be the best widget, if you're happy to go off the standard HTML input types. Most libraries have one, like bootstrap and jQuery UI.


1

(Speaking as a user here) Having been listening to audiobooks daily for over a decade, I can tell from personal experience that it depends heavily on the speaker. Some are still very clear at x1.8, and others begin to get blurry at 1.3. Of course, depends on the listener as well. I don't think it's too granular - my favorite audiobook player has the same ...


1

As others said, your priority would be to get the data as fast as possible to users. Even then if the problem persists because of slow internet connections, I can suggest you the following Indicate them to switch to a better connectivity Give them something to read while loading so that it would take their mind off from waiting(Some interesting facts ...


1

First of all you need to identify why nothing is happening even after say x seconds. simply showing user that his network might be slow (since you have mentioned facebook's example screen here) without knowing that will be very wrong. If the users network is slow then you can follow the facebook's approach, also you can give user a reconnect button which ...


1

A carousel is an animated content. Therefore, you have to be aware that it will bother the readability of the other informations on the page. That being said, using a carousel, there is no straight answer to your questions. The reading time depends of the content complexity. A quite good pattern consists into pausing the animation on mouse over (with a ...


1

Mac OSX has a right-click contextual menu somewhat like yours: I'm concerned about a couple things in your solution. (1) Keep in mind that stray clicks happen. As people mouse around they sometimes touch the mouse button enough to click things they didn't intend to click. So every word you can mark as known has to also be markable as unknown. It looks like ...


1

Are there any generally recommended best practices for image size requirements? No. Is it generally accepted for a a RWD site that a separate set of smaller image should be used for tablet vs. desktop? In most cases, yes. Right now, certain landing pages have images as high as 1mb, and a total download of around 4.7mb. Should I be concerned? ...


1

Tim Schlechter solved the "tag input UX problem" pretty good with his Bootstrap Tags Input Project. It collects the tags in the input box (not actually but it looks like that). It allows efficient usage with the keyboard. Check it out! It works like that: You have a div with the tags and a text input inside. If the text input is empty you can: move it ...


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