Hot answers tagged

78

"Sort by date" is probably the most common option, but it's not the way that most people speak. Where possible, I prefer speaking like a human (as opposed to an engineer), and so I would prefer using something like: Newest first or Oldest first


36

It depends directly on the language and if the diacritic produces a new letter or simply a variation of the same letter. In French (or Italian, Catalan, Portuguese...), accented characters (such as À, É, Ê, Ô, Ö, etc.) doesn't produce a new letter, they are only variation of the same letter. As such, one would expect words starting with an accented ...


29

I'd be inclined to "Recommended Sorting", but since it breaks the "Sort by..." pattern, I'd choose either "Sort Automatically" which breaks the pattern only slightly, or one of my favourite terms for this kind of "magic": Relevance. So I'd go with Sort by Relevance. After all, what heuristic does is being more relevant to the user's interest.


28

Capitalization frequently matters for sorting algorithms, but seldom matters for end users. Trying to explain why "a" comes after "Z" to someone who doesn't know what ASCII is can make for a very frustrating user experience. Your first example is the best way. It makes it easier to find a specific word since there is only one alphabet instead of two. It ...


25

The best method is to use the lower bound of a statistical confidence interval. I won't go into detail about how to do this, as Evan Miller has a great post on How NOT to sort by average rating for a Bernoulli distribution - which is what you have. The main reason that you would use this method is to find a balance between the average vote and the number ...


16

I quite like the approach that the game Wordament takes: You are able to see the top results, as well as those near your ranking. I would prefer if it could ensure your score was on-screen initially though, probably by reducing the number of players before the "split" and even just above your own score.


15

Should clicking a column header a third time remove the ascending or descending order? No it shouldn't Whatever the previous arrangement was that wasn't ascending or descending should be an ascending or descending order of another column. If a user desires to go back to that view of the current column not being sorted one would figure out what column ...


13

I would show a shaded / coloured bar with the user above the first place person in the list, and then show the standard list with them in whatever position they are in. It's what StackExchange did for the Winter Bash special, and it worked really well. I happen to be at the top, so you see me twice, but I would be at the top even if I were in Benny's ...


13

TL;DR: Use a multi factor ranking system. A good example to follow is the way that Google rank search results. We of course don't know the precise details of their ranking algorithm, but they have arguably done the most research on this and have the most success. What we do know for sure is that Google include a large number of factors and apply a ...


13

This is always tricky, but I think you could implement a list view as in StackExchange User Reputation League. Even if an item isn't added by a user per see, it could be used in your case as well. Add the newly added item to the top of the list keeping the sorting/filtering options intact. But make clear that this is not a part of the filter/sort by changing ...


12

It is well known that when people select icons or buttons, they aren't consciously evaluating that icon and then choosing it. They are usually going by memory. The factor that most effects our memory of items to select is their spatial position. So if you move icons as people use them, you will end up subtly frustrating people. As an example, Microsoft ...


12

Ideally, I would go with 'by date' since it is more accessible. Even people with English as their non-primary language understand the word date easily, where as chronological might be a hit or a miss.


11

If I were looking for something clearer I'd use 'Sort by Recommended' That said, whimsical terms like Genius and Magic (and Automagic) don't bother me. I see them as shorthand for complex process that a good UX makes simple; in this case, it's personalized sorting. Since personalization features are often marketed as differentiators, new terms will probably ...


10

I guess it depends on what you want to do with it, and how often you imagine it would be used. Solution 1: Badges One way would be to add a badge-like indicator to the sorting: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You will need to consider not only the display, but the actual interaction for manipulating it. How do you ...


10

Starting with Windows 7, Microsoft changed their default method of sorting directories by file name to use "numeric" sorting. (Some info here) While I couldn't find a specification of its behavior, I managed to reverse engineer it. This algorithm should compare two alphanumeric strings and determine which one comes first. Split each filename into ...


9

It matters because if it's sorted by case, you are sorting by two criteria (case and then alphabetical order) instead of 1 (just alphabetical order) thus having two implicit sublists, which adds cognitive load. 99% of the time implicit representations are terribly bad for users. So when scanning for a lower-case word users will have to: (first time) Search ...


9

I know from experience that it's better to add a default sort indicator. For example, many of our users didn't realised the table columns are sortable and didn't even tried to sort them if there was no indicator. So we were receiving constant questions/suggestions to make the columns sortable. Our solution was to add default sort indicators like this: If ...


8

The most natural ordering strategy would be that items with an empty slot are ordered outside the items with filled slots, whether it'd be a descending or ascending list. For example if you're sorting a list of products on the rate of the product in a descending order then you as a user is not the least interested in seeing the products that aren't rated at ...


7

The simple answer is that people are more interested in newer content than older content. With old content first, people will come to a site and first be shown something that they have seen before - bad UX. Then they will have to remember what page they were on last - bad UX. Then they have to navigate to some page which may not be easily accessible (...


7

The use of integers, as suggested by Andre may be your best bet, but I’d test it. It may only work for the geekier of users. I, however, would like to suggest that your second option of having dedicated sorting controls is often worth the clutter. This is especially true if the sorting controls are interactive; for example, users can open a dropdown for ...


7

JohnGB's answer works well at the top of a ratings list, but it causes problems further down the list. For an example, using 95% confidence intervals: A has 100 upvotes, 3 downvote (97%). Confidence Interval: (0.917, 0.990) B has 10 upvotes, 0 downvotes (100%). Confidence Interval: (0.722, 1) C has 180 upvotes, 100 downvotes (67%). Confidence Interval: (0....


7

For a timeline to be more than a "sort by date" option, it needs to have another facet to it. What other useful information will displayed by the timeline other than just the order in which events happened? For example, if I was making filterable timeline of WWII events, I could use the space between events to give an indication of how far apart they were ...


7

When sorting anything either a Vertical or Horizontal list of items is preferred. (but not both) A vertical list is my personal preference as many devices are built to easily scroll up and down (i.e. mouse wheel, smartphones, etc.) among other reasons. Sorting Cards in a Grid First of all, this is a great question so go ahead and vote it up now. Laying ...


7

Following the OP's update, I'll start with a specific suggestion for their problem. This will be followed by the sort of approach that you might take in the more general case (a slightly updated version of my original answer). Specific Answer: Campaign Events As I understand your needs, your users still need to be aware of new events as they arrive, even ...


6

I would call it "pairwise comparison". I recall that IBM Rational Focal Point uses this method to rank requirements. The purpose is to get a list ordered by priority, even though the list of requirements could be overwhelming. Divide and conquer. The items of pairs that you are not able to answer still get a place in the list based on the result of those ...


6

You could try a User Centric approach where the logged-in user sees his position right in the middle of the page, surrounded by the 10 people on top and 10 under him/her. click, or ideally scroll to see full list starting at the top.


6

I think you have two options: The first one is to sort database entries (chronologially, alphabetically, numerically) and the second one is to sort a list by a column value (data object attribute). It might depend on the amount or type of options you are going to present. In the first case you would have the text "Sort" followed by a dropdown with the ...


6

I typically use a grippy looking dotted area like this, that's also roughly the size/shape of a fingertip. ...or 3 bars indicating a similarly grippable area: The idea being to make it look like the surface of the button itself stippled or embossed - and so making it more connected to the whole button rather than being a separate function or action. Here'...


6

Personally, I think you should leave it up to what users are most used to which is the 'sort bar' you have in your second picture. Alternatively, you can do what sites like Amazon do and just provide the sorting options in a dropdown menu like so: These two methods are the most common and users are likely to be used to them. Deviating too much from them ...


6

You really just need to create contrast between the sorted column and the non-sorted columns. I would keep the carrot, as it is a symbol many people are used to seeing. You may consider adding a light background color or updating the text in the header to bold. I'd only use one of these tools though, you don't typically need to put a disproportionate ...


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