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36

It depends directly on the language and if the diacritic produces a new letter or simply a variation of the same letter. In French (or Italian, Catalan, Portuguese...), accented characters (such as À, É, Ê, Ô, Ö, etc.) doesn't produce a new letter, they are only variation of the same letter. As such, one would expect words starting with an accented ...


18

Ω (Alt 234) will push an item to the bottom in windows file folders; I like it because it's intuitive.


17

I made a demo solution with CSS3. The Salary column is in ascending sorted status and the Bonus column is in descending one. I commit the work to github at horiontal-tight-table-sorter-css3. You can have a quick review of the html page here htmlpreview horiontal-tight-table-sorter-css3. For the sake of the demo, I only tested it on Chrome. Hope this help....


12

Starting with Windows 7, Microsoft changed their default method of sorting directories by file name to use "numeric" sorting. (Some info here) While I couldn't find a specification of its behavior, I managed to reverse engineer it. This algorithm should compare two alphanumeric strings and determine which one comes first. Split each filename into ...


9

I think adding a progress-tracker would be a good way to guide the user to complete the 3 step process. Check out the mockup below. When the page loads up all the steps in the progress tracker would be grey. But as the user selects an option under each list, the selected value can be displayed right above the list with some sort of indication that it's the ...


8

I would never understand that the [Filter by] and [Sort by] elements are clickable if you did not write it. It is not a good approach. However, even at the end they are a little bit confusing to me. What I would do would be using the top pattern but changing it a little bit, so that the button is separated from the row of fields:


7

Based on code page 437, here is a list of characters that come after z. Note they are listed in sort order. Omega is probably the most appropriate for this use case, because it is the last letter of the Greek alphabet. α alpha U+03B1 Alt 224 Γ gamma U+0393 Alt 226 δ delta U+03B4 Alt 235 ε epsilon U+03B5 Alt 238 Θ theta ...


6

I typically use a grippy looking dotted area like this, that's also roughly the size/shape of a fingertip. ...or 3 bars indicating a similarly grippable area: The idea being to make it look like the surface of the button itself stippled or embossed - and so making it more connected to the whole button rather than being a separate function or action. Here'...


6

I don't think you'll find something about this because the premise seems to be incorrect, since sorting is a way of filtering, thus the answer is already included in the question. However, if you consider filtering as an action with sorting and filtering(n) as sub-actions then you could recognize some patterns, which will vary with amount of data, ...


5

The human brain and a computer algorithm work quite differently. Your assumption that it should be easier to start in the middle of a list is wrong. In those cases you would first need to figure out what the middle point of your list was. Then you would need to figure out whether the item you are searching for would be above or below this middle point. ...


5

And if it has maximum of 30 items and all of them are visible why you just not place an action at the end of the list and add an ability to quickly reorder the list? So, position of the new item will be obvious. And you can keep the selection untouched in this case.


5

Try something like this. Keep the horizontal positioning of the column labels the same and add sorting horizontally on top but in smaller font using some noticeable color. If possible, make the whole div (or table cell) having that column label clickable and sort icons clickable.


5

A possible solution would be to show where the row landed by scrolling the entire table up or down after the edit is complete, then showing a highlight around the position of the new location. Nothing that would last very long, just enough time that the user can locate where it went. This would require some animation and scroll hijacking, but I like the use ...


5

As a German, I know of two ways how this is handled. Either, "ö" is treated as "o" (e.g., in an encyclopedia) or it is treated as "oe" (e.g., in a phone book). "ß" is always treated as "ss". Even the German ISO (DIN) knows these two variants: DIN 5007 Variants 1 and 2 On the software side, database like MySQL have different collations. There is no ...


4

What should happen is that the sort mark is switched over to the Employee column and that it the row should be sorted according to ascending order of that column. Regardless of what the column currently holds. This may or may not change the order of the rows depending on the "natural" order of the underlying information. The current sort order of the ...


4

My experience has been that numbering items in a table adds a lot of clarity in many situations. Just think of a simple situation where someone wants to refer to a row. How do they do that when there aren't any numbers? Unless the set is very small or there is a clear reason why numbering will not add any value, I would strongly suggest that you keep the ...


4

I dont really get why you are not using autocomplete as an option. Since your employee list is already sorted in alphabetical order,all you need to do is to pull up the data for the particular letter when the user types the first alphabet This would work much better than using a dropdown as all the user has to do is to type the letter to pull up the data ...


4

A few reasons: it's generally easier for a user to grok how items are being ordered if they start at one end of the list; it's typically simpler to get users to scroll down an interface than up, especially on the web where content is usually laid out as a long, static page. Yes, there are some visual tricks that imply some content is hidden up above the ...


4

You mentioned people may have selected the course or the course and place, which means the course list and place list become clutter and make them think "I have chosen that yet..." Below is my suggestion, almost the same with Benny and Girish. Only difference is to hide the list if user already selected and grayed out


4

I detest the iTunes UX, so I'm a fan of any competition :-) The 'conventional' way to sort is by clicking on the column headers. So I think any solution should attempt to be compatible with this behavior. For multi-column sort, things become more difficult. Columns can quickly get cluttered with tiny arrows or badges. The tiny directional arrows can be ...


4

Any list of items with text labels can at least be grouped by first letter. That said, I can't even imagine 1000+ root level categories for movies. Can these categories be curated down to just a few that make sense because how do I even know which category to search for?


4

Assuming you want to avoid hierarchical categorization, you can use freeform category tags to apply multiple filters:


4

For a danish site we faced the same issue, and we grouped them as separate characters to avoid the confusion. The grouping needs to be understandable for the users.


4

The rule is that you should put names into categories, and sort them, in such a way that your users will find them where they expect them. You follow the rules of the user's language. For example, if you have a Swedish name like Ångström, and your users are British, you sort it under the letter A because that's where British users would look for it. If your ...


3

If a table has sorting and/or filtering capabilities, numbering the rows is not very valuable. Those numbers will either be out of order once you sort (or skipping rows when you filter), or they will change each time the user performs one of those actions, making the numbers meaningless. I could see including the numbers in a PDF download of the table (or ...


3

Here is another option. It assumes - the records are displayed in some sort of table - there are always one or more records selected when the table has focus - sorting the table does not affect the selected state of a record Sorting the records should keep the selected record(s) in view. When one record is selected, that record remains in view regardless ...


3

I'd say it depends on the destination of the export. If it can do sorting (or indeed any form of processing) then it probably doesn't matter whether the data is exported in it's sorted form or not. In this case the data is likely to be sorted (processed) in the target application so exporting the data sorted might be counter-productive. As this is the usual ...


3

Depending on how much space you have you could just explicitly tell the user what's going on. Here is suggested mockup: The little purple arrows are butcon toggles which will reverse the sort order when clicked. The user is able to change the sorting dimension by selecting something other than Tenure or Role via the dropdown control. The only issue with ...


3

Generally you will be constrained for space on a mobile device, and so I would tend to go for the option that is more space friendly and more versatile. I would opt for a Sort by button rather than a Sort button, as the latter implies an action rather than a preference. When someone selects the Sort by button, I would open a dialogue with the options that ...


3

While I agree with the commenters that your question is overly broad, in the general case the answer is no, providing both options will not confuse your users. In fact, what you are describing is an interface pattern called faceted search and it is one of the most common patterns on the web. Amazon uses it: Zappos uses it: Once you recognize this pattern, ...


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