47

While space is an obvious part of the equation, it's not the main one, you could simply have a sliding physical keyboard just as previous generations of smartphones and be a happy camper. However, physical keyboards had several issues: smaller keys than on-screen keys structural weakness short lifetime (the flex connector and pieces of sliding keyboards had ...


35

What caused this decline in the use of physical keyboards? The iPhone What is the impact on the UX of mobile devices? This is a pretty deep question and is tough to answer objectively. I would argue that dropping the physical keyboard was a net gain. That the benefits it brought far outweighed the usefulness of the physical keyboard. As others have ...


23

The main reason is versatility. A keyboard in software can be easily adapted to different layouts, different character/symbol sets and different cultures. In addition, custom keyboards such as Swype or Word Flow are then feasible. Physical keyboards add to the physical complexity of the device, have to be revealed (deployed) to be usable and are more ...


22

Good, practical question. In my experience with working on a booking platform recently, we touched/worked on this. More thoughts: Why this is probably done: To ensure that the notification reaches the user through some channel or other. There could be cases where a few users ignore SMSs, or a few others do not check emails regularly. Hence, multiple ...


13

There is little doubt that for most people a touch device has positive psychological effects. Watch a small child using a tablet vs a computer, or even better, watch an autistic person interact with a tablet. Watch their faces as it opens a new world to them, and you will be convinced. Touch screens allow people to interact more naturally with devices as ...


11

It could be useful in the following circumstances: When the user's native language isn't English, but they are more familiar with English labels than the native equivalents. For users who need to switch keyboards (and auto-complete dictionary) using both their native language and English (or another secondary language). For users that give their old phones ...


11

It's not. There remain vastly more desktop users than mobile users; 1.25 billion. The current number of active Windows users worldwide. 500 million. The number of Windows 7 licenses sold since October 2009. 400 million. The number of x86 PCs that will be sold in the next 12 months. 247 million. The number of iOS devices (iPhone, iPod touch, iPad) ...


10

You could try something like this: Note the line breaks at left and right as well as the cut off text. Omit the left line breaks if nothing to swipe to at left. Even the line breaks alone would be a very simple cue that would be better than nothing if the cut off text is a problem to implement:


8

Touch screens are really still at an early stage in the life and history of mobile devices, but touch (or haptic) feedback is at an even earlier stage of development (despite probably having been around for longer!), largely due to lack of funding, cost of prototyping and risk of non-widespread take up. Rachel Hinman (currently at Nokia) is a thought leader ...


7

The basic premise of the question lies in the fact that phones have changed (almost instantly) from the tactile monsters to touch beings and that brings about a drastic shift in how people interact with them and they suddenly require more attention (idea very nicely put in the question). Phones used to be our usual machines with tactile feedback at the ...


7

I doubt your design is going to be usable. I see several issues: There is an arbitrary limit to the amount of time you can fill in. I think it will be 12 hours and 59 minutes maximum. The layout of the time over a half circle is unfamiliar. It reminds of a clock face, but it isn't. In the context of time, I expect that to work confusing. Note that a real ...


6

One of my favourite soluion for this is pulse's: on first run, display an overlay with help: you can show this once, and never worry about it again. Of course it has downsides as well: user forget it quickly, or ... But you should thick to the Android 4.x design conventions, section swiping between tabs. Also a good idea would be something like the Play ...


6

Start with the smallest form factor first (in your case the phone) since the lack of space will give you the opportunity to require you to define the primary focus of the app and what is the primary content that must be provided to allow the user to do his task and not allow you to add too much extraneous stuff. While moving up to higher form factors, ...


6

I recently worked on an app that had a feature that allowed the user to search or browse for clinics nearby. One thing I got from the tests is that the map view works great mainly for visually displaying (quickly) what is nearby the user. They can process that much faster via the map/pin UI. However, if the user is looking for more information or browsing, ...


6

From the electronics perspective, it seems to me if they wanted to implement the "Instant Power On", it was easy to do. I think the reason for the delay is usability, considering this two aspects: It makes it harder to unintentionally power it on, specially when it is on a pocket Making the act of "Power on" symmetric to the "Power off" act, which makes ...


6

Optimizing a smartphone's design for the most immersive color could make sense if you anticipated a situation where people would frequently be seeing its color while watching videos, browsing the web, etc. However, this 2013 study indicated that 87% of iPhone owners and 75% of non-iPhone owners used their phone in cases. http://www.theverge.com/2014/10/28/...


6

Both are equally good in terms of security. According to me the first senerio is good enough and adapted one. We are used to first senerio. The second senerio doesn't making much changes and unnecessarily user will confused with the new approch to do things. In terms of UX, the first senerio is much easy and user know this gonna happen. Most of the ...


5

Could It could work in both orientations? If you had to limit it to one. Fix the orientation and work in whichever is the "longest" Example: If its mobile portrait (go up and down) If its mobile landscape (go left to right) I think the limited space is the main factor that would effect playability. You need to take advantage of the orientation that ...


5

In context (i.e. while using the app), "Notifications" is probably the most user friendly language choice. Examples from iOS: iOS main settings uses "Notifications" Facebook uses "Notifications" (interestingly when you click into this, the heading reads "Manage Push Notifications") Twitter uses "Notifications" These companies spend countless time and ...


5

You should offer bezel swipe here, meaning: When dragging your finger horizontally within the screen, treat this as panning/swiping within the tab contents (e.g. panning a map). When dragging your finger from the side of the screen (from the bezel), treat this as changing tabs. This is already recognized behavior in Chrome for Android, and is the default ...


5

No, Chinese keyboards usually have the same amount or fewer keys depending on the keyboard type they use. iOS 7 lists 6 Chinese keyboard types, 3 of which can also be used in Simplified mode: Handwriting: user draws a stroke or character from which the computer recommends autocomplete options Stroke: user selects from a small set of character categories (...


5

So that you don't accidentally hit the power button when you mean to press the volume buttons. Even if the put the power button away from the volume buttons, you can easily get them confused since they are used so much.


5

Most probably because of 2 trends in the smartphone industry. Phones get thinner and thinner, and losing a physical keyboard makes a phone a lot less thick. Screens on phones kept getting bigger, and started using touchscreen. The combination of these gave to option to type on your screen by tabbing a "digital" keyboard. The downside to this though, is ...


4

I don't think tabs are appropriate for your app. Looking at the views you presented they are not really multiple views of the same data, and not something I think users need to rapidly switch back and forth between. It looks like you are using tabs more as a form of navigation, which would be better handled by the Action Bar. http://developer.android.com/...


4

There are several problems with mobile devices compared to lap tops’. The screen is smaller making it harder to show “all you need” to the user at the same time. Also, navigation is trickier and more often than on lap tops’ users navigate wrong unintentionally – with the effect that user need to use the back button and go forward again. This makes the ...


4

I'm failing to find any research reports that back this up but you could approach if from a familiarity angle. Using a keyboard isn't an instinctive process - we have to learn how to use one efficiently. Most of us would have learned with a physical keyboard. With the move to smartphones and touch screens we have had to learn again, even though we're still ...


4

Well first the button on the front of the iPhone isn't the power button, they place theirs on the side as well. The reason for not putting the power button on the front is that where the users can most easily reach, so that real estate is used for functions that occur more commonly like backward navigation such as the iPhone. Also many other phone ...


4

To keep costs down I would rephrase the question as 'Why do manufacturers sell devices with seemingly insufficient memory?'. The answer is to make the device more affordable, particularly in developing markets where consumers are very price sensitive and may have lower disposable incomes. App bundling The other secondary affect to this to consider is ...


4

Because smartphones are used outdoors... I suspect it is mostly fashion and showing off, as Koen Lageveen suggests here. However, there is a potential usability benefit. Smartphones are more likely to be used outdoors in bright ambient light. Bright ambient light tends to wash out colors, all other things being equal. If the color saturation were lower, ...


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