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31

To make AMBULANCE easier read for vehicles in front of the ambulance. Ambulance are typically in greater speed than surrounding vehicles which make the ambulance front visible in other cars rear view mirror. At least those cars that need to get away to give room for the ambulance passing through traffic. The most common modern usage of mirror writing can ...


21

You are talking about Stroop Effect. stroop effect by Wikipedia It is more intuitive and easier to remember to show a colour name in the colour itself.


11

The "shark-tooth" yield lines are not arrows that point you in a direction. They are a line of yield signs - also known as a yield line. In Europe this is a standard and all drivers are familiar with this. At roundabouts these yield lines are often used in combination with a roundabout sign. The roundabout sign uses arrows to indicate in wich ...


7

Nowadays, it's done more out of tradition and convention than for functional reasons While the original purpose of the reversed 'AMBULANCE' was better readability, advances in lighting, safety design, and understanding of visual cognition have rendered this lettering of secondary importance. Some issues with the reverse AMBULANCE signage: The word is long ...


7

The list states things to DO and NOT to DO. The picture shows the areas where to BE and where NOT to BE. There is no direct relation between Doing things in the Be area and Not Doing things in the Not Be area. Or put in a different way, Do things should be done independently of the area, and Do Not things shouldn't be done independently of the area. It ...


6

Here is what goes through my mind when I see those shark teeth on the road... Am I going the wrong way? Is this against the flow of traffic? Will those things pop my tires? In any case, driving into arrows that are pointing at you is jarring and can make you think twice and proceed with caution. That is exactly the goal here to make drivers more alert ...


5

Your top example is way more readable. It's clean, spaced, and your eyes naturally flow through the days and times. Here's several different ways the alignment and format could look: Side Note: Remember to use a monospaced or fixed-width font like Consolas or Courier so that everything lines up nicely.


4

Introduces Calculation, Gamification, and Additional Cognitive Load to the Interaction In addition to the practical factors presented by Michael Lai, I suggest a key reason for not including this feature is that it introduces potentially negative factors to the interaction. Ideal User Reaction "Light changing. Red soon. Prepare to stop". Potential ...


4

I suggest not splitting the Do and Do Not along the safety boundary in the diagram. Having them split like that makes one think one is for one side and the other is for the other, just like the "man" and "no man" icons. Next brings the confusion of the "Do" on the hazard side and the "Do Not" on the safe side. More mental processing needs done. And finally ...


4

Sometimes bad design is just what it seems The triangular yield indicators here are called yield lines (see Wikipedia, DOT specifications and this article on when and how they can be used) and their appearance in a single-car lane is probably the result of bad design. They are intended to mark a position on the road where drivers should yield to other ...


2

Left aligned text is easier to read than centered or right aligned text. This is because when you center or right align your text, the starting place of each line changes. This forces your users to work harder to find where each line begins to continue reading. Without a straight left edge, there is no consistent place where users can move their eyes to when ...


2

Modern city traffic lights often have a "green wave" system, where you can drive at the legal speed limit and always encounter green. If you are the first car in such a "wave" then the light will turn green just before you cross its line. Without a pre-green phase (in practice red-yellow) this doesn't work; you'd have to reduce speed in case the green wave ...


2

A French friend of mine once answered my asking of this question by saying that their light durations tend to be quite long, so the norm is to switch your car's engine off while you wait. The amber warning is then used as an indication to start your engine again and prepare to disembark. Here in South Africa our standard light durations are relatively short,...


2

Organization loves numbers Using numbers for organization is great. You can list them; order them; they're short enough to fill into limited space form, etc. In society we use numbers all the time to identify things: think car registration numbers; university student numbers; personal identification numbers. The problem with long random numbers is that you ...


1

Actually there are examples of this in different countries, or at least I have seen it in Shanghai before. There are a lot of reasons behind whether systems like this can be implemented or not, but a traffic engineer might provide a more accurate answer. But in general these are the considerations that I know: Cost: probably the number one consideration ...


1

To add to Knuckles's improvements... I'd have added blood splatter, but it was going to take too much time


1

It's a cultural difference for a stop sign, in Europe and many countries in Asia and South America (and for what I saw, some parts of Noth America), it's a clear reference and everybody knows what it means. From a significance meaning, it's supposed to be a path that opens to give way (in Europe is popularly known as "a knife that will damage your tires" ...


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