4

here is my feedback to the all three options: The message in the red box states that something is wrong, however, it isn't. The button "+Add products" doesn't represent the actual action, because no products will be added when the user hits it. The dummy items below add visual complexity to the page, which is confusing. The message about the empty cart is ...


3

I've experienced ecommerce sites where after adding an item, a modal pops up that gives me the option to checkout or continue shopping. It's not entirely annoying since I typically don't add a ton of items but can imagine how it could be. Dictating a user's experience for them (i.e., forcing checkout) is a surefire way to get people to abandon. You could ...


3

If it is the cart they oppose, don´t give them one. What you do need tho is a way for the user to see everything they have selected, delete stuff, edit quantities or add stuff. That is in fact a cart, but you don´t have to call it that. Call it pre-checkout, or even just put the functionality in the checkout page. What you do need is a way for the user to ...


2

OP could have added a picture to illustrate the context of use of progress bar. In this answer, I will assume it's the kind that indicates which checkout step the user is at, and each checkout step is on a different page instead of the same page. Progress bars are good for breaking down a long, complex form into shorter, digestible sections. E.g. a ...


2

As for the quantity of product in stock - Definitely at the time of payment - there is often a situation that the user adds the product to the cart, but does not complete the transaction. When it comes to discounts and prices - Operations should be carried out in the basket, to inform the user about available promotions and possibilities


2

I think it's great to have this quantity stepper n Product Details page and in the Shopping cart. One interesting example I saw: When you click add to cart The buttons is transforming in the quantity stepper: I would also consider adding suggested amounts under this quantity stepper if you start noticing patterns for specific products where customers ...


1

How do you get measurable results? Run a usability test and measure the results. That said, I wasn’t positive from the question if it was the development product manager, the client you’re providing the page to, or your development colleagues who were opposed to UX testing. If it’s the paying customer, you do what he or she wants. One way to steer the ...


1

I'm not sure I'd agree with the "psychological comforts and conventions in having the security blanket of a cart." Users are used to it as it's the norm when shopping online, and it does have value to confirm all the items before receiving shipping info if that's being calculated on the fly. I'm more concern with: When a users selects an item to they go ...


1

Staying on the same page is always a better actions to not confuse customers. Adding basket is fully other action than navigating to the basket. On the other hand, it also depends on what you want clients to do... If user typically buy one kind of item It will make for your clients easier to navigate them to basket as Amazon did. Or showing it as a pop-up....


1

I recommend going with the second approach or taking the user to the shopping cart page. Tooltips/ drop-downs might not be a good idea when a user has added multiple items to their shopping cart. A side flyout/ page gives more real estate space for displaying their cart contents. Also agreed with Martyn about tablet users. Here are two examples of platforms ...


1

if the process is short, unnecessary solicitation feeling less = better Users must feel that they can turn back and buy more.


1

In today's reality, many processes are limited to the minimum amount of interaction. The progress bar function is to show progress or signal at what stage the task is being performed. If the task is short or easy, it isn't required to create something that indicates its state. EDIT: If you consider Shopping-cart as first step of process - I think it's ...


1

It's a tricky one. E-commerce users tend to be price-sensitive. If you show them the voucher field, they will have a feeling that they can save. They google for the code, try several and if none worked for them, feel frustrated and could leave your website with a bad feeling and without a purchase. Moreover, then can get distracted by something and never ...


1

Assuming "add voucher code" is where the user enters a code to receive a discount... I would consider adding it in both places. If it is on the cart, the user can easily add it and see their total cost even before they are ready to check out. If they did not enter a code on the cart page, ask for it again in the checkout flow. If they have already done ...


1

The best 2 solutions that I found until the moment are: Show 3 options for continue buying Show last seen products in a row See the print screens


1

Maybe you don't want to buy something in the same product category, with that purpose I would take the user to the front page (that should be the one that let me see the general categories). If you are really buying objects on the same category, there are other alternatives before clicking to the "continue shopping" button, for example: "The users that buy ...


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