214

Maybe because they are curious about what is inside this combobox's arrow. Have you tried to change it to another component like a spinner ? I don't have any particular research about it, it is just my guess.


81

I don't think multiple clicks are a bad thing in the shopping cart. While here, some users will double check things. Unless you're seeing users drop out, I wouldn't worry about it. If you want to understand why they're doing it, some think-aloud usability tests will tell you. (Don't ask them, after the fact, to remember why they did it; listen to their ...


76

From a non-UX designer perspective: It looks like your €2.499,00 is crossed out while being replaced and highlighted by €650,00. This would be jarring to anyone who was expecting and prepared to pay €2.500,00, but then seeing a price that is considerably lower. If I could save €1.849,00 on a purchase I would definitely do everything I could think of to make ...


60

For me personally I would go with case B: When you are prompted for shipping address I think users immediately know the answer (where I want my goods to be delivered). It's a simple answer. However, in the case of billing address users can be hesitant (makes them think), but if they have already inputted the shipping address it will be easier for them to ...


50

As a user I would expect to fill my shipping address first because I might need to check whether the seller ships to that particular location. Then if it ships I might enter billing address. Some checkout processes are divided on multiple pages. It seems more logical to put the shipping address before billing address, in order to check if shipping is ...


28

Since you have phrased your question 'Is it acceptable...', the answer is: Yes it is acceptable. A lot of things are sub-optimal and still acceptable. Depends on your standards :) Is it the best possible choice of colors for this particular action? No, very likely not! It does one thing and only one thing very good - stand out, however it also introduces a ...


27

It's explained in Amazon's website, in this page Why don't we show the price?: Retailers like Amazon have the legal right to set their own prices independently, but some manufacturers place restrictions on how those prices may be communicated. Because our price on this item is lower than the manufacturer's "minimum advertised price," the ...


27

If you can, perform some testing and gather information about why are users clicking on the amount dropdown. Probably most users are clicking for the same reason. That said, my guess is that it might not be absolutely clear that what there is behind the dropdown are plain numbers: 1 2 3 ... and users might think there could be other kind of options: 1 1 ...


23

I just managed to find your website and proceeded as if I was a customer. And maybe with a little bias, but I also clicked the 'amount' button out of nowhere. It is hard to explain, but it is just a little 'tic'; as you are offering quite expensive products, the user wants to check that everything is 100% set up right (clicking it and verifying it's set to ...


21

I can see no real functional reason to clear a basket automatically. Basket should have a function to clear old(er) items. A "select all" on the list of items in the basket and "remove from basket" action would suffice for that. Other than that there should be warnings on price changes as Amazon does. And of course there should be a warning when an item in ...


20

Check out Google Drive - they use red buttons. I don't think that red signals error as long as the theme and GUI parts of the page goes in red (and that is probably why Google uses those colors). If there would have been a red and a green button, then I would have been suspicious about clicking the red, but in this case I don't get that feeling. The ...


20

YES, but.... In fact, you don't need to delete the promo code itself, but the association to the product. However, it's always good to delete the promo code as well, for the reasons below: Make your user's life easier You're building this for an user, and you're building an usability paradigm, thus this paradigm has to keep the user in mind. One of the ...


19

Well it's not a completely unused pattern: I see this pattern mostly used where the purchase button is the only step in the process (that or purchase button + sign in/password). This is how Google Play, iTunes/the App Store and Amazon's App store all work. Note the following about all of these stores: There's no cart. There's one step and (usually) no ...


16

This is tricky, because you have a variety of different scenarios for when automatically clearing items is a great idea and probably just as many for when it’s not. Personally I agree that it shouldn’t be cleared. I’ve been surprised when visiting the same site again to find items in my cart that I didn’t remove by myself. But that’s just me — and the items ...


16

Another possibility, given the age of your users: All through the 1990s and early "aughts" a light gray like you are using meant "not an option". We called it "grayed out". So, to me, (I am in your user's age group) it looks like it's not active for some reason. Also, you have one bright color on what I think is the discount rather than the price that is to ...


15

Several airlines do use copy such as basket (e.g. Ryanair.com) for their check out process. It's also the place where additional services such as insurance or extra baggage allowance are purchased. Though flights that are selected are indeed (almost) never saved in that checkout. It can be assumed that this is due to their temporary pre-reservation status. ...


15

I'm for Case B. Right when the user goes to checkout, they will want to: See if that item ships to their location Check shipping costs associated with their location Since billing information is directly related to payment for the order, it should be near the end. The checkout process should be grouped into something like: Shipping > Shipping Costs > ...


13

You are asking the wrong question. The point of showing the number of items in the cart is to show the 'Status' of the cart. It works as a really good signifier to the user that he has added X number of items in the cart. Scenarios to think when you do not show number of items: You add an item to the cart, but, actually the click didn't register and you ...


11

The "1" in grey on grey looks "disabled". Grey means "disabled". So some of your users probably think that the quantity is not set yet and click to set the quantity to 1. The quantity is not the only problem. On the images, I see an accessibility problem. Several meaningful texts and figures are in grey on white or in grey on grey. 1) This may mean "...


9

I would combine the waiting list and a fix time slot and get the benefits of both. Waiting lists aren't just helpful when tickets are getting short. You can use them even if your course is sold out for days to resale returning tickets. A fix time slot sets the user a bit under pressure (in a good way) and, different from a refreshing session timeout, ...


9

Color associations are very cultural thing. In computer culture I assume people usually don't think: oh blood, yammi. At least my experience is that red implies mostly one of the following: Attention: whatever it is, it must be important Error: As developers always wanted attention for errors, in the right context red is highly associated with errors. Just ...


9

I don't think there is any great benefit in having both "Buy Now" and "Add to Cart" options, if the only difference is that one takes the customer straight to the checkout. I think it's an unnecessary complication that forces the customer to think about which route they should follow. The traditional paradigm of adding products to a cart and then checking ...


9

The shopping basket concept is generally held to mean that the customer can buy multiple items in one go at a checkout. However, most IATA-member airlines either do not permit or strongly discourage their agents from selling multiple, unrelated tickets in a single transaction. In some cases it is also not allowed by local law to sell certain itineraries. ...


8

The session is stored on the server whereas the cookies is stored on the user desktop. In the session, you have no way to retrieve the cart's information after the session is expired (generally 30 minutes at most). You will throw away 2 hours of Paula's time, who has struggled to choose that red shirt over the green one. Cookies's size and number are ...


7

Firstly don't rely on colour only, a surprisingly large number of people have difficulty interpreting colours. Position would be a better way of differentiating, or using contrast or borders. As far as the wording goes: ask yourself this question: when a person is in the supermarket, do they delete or clear an item from their trolley ? If you asked 100 ...


7

This depends entirely on your target audience. There are two trains of thoughts, but both have ultimately the same outcome: Tell them there and then on the product page. In detail: Audiences who pay VAT Most consumers will not want to be surprised by VAT at the checkout (it is a hidden cost) and yes this would definitely reduce the number of abandoned ...


7

You should only create an account when it's strictly necessary and then only if the user wants to make an account. If possible you should allow users to complete a transaction as a "guest" whereby they enter all their details but these are only stored with the current order and not used to create an account. You can suggest to the user that they create an ...


7

1) Ideally an order is generated once an user is done with the payment. You could call it Order summary, where an Order ID is usually attached to it for reference. At cart stage, "Delete Order" as an interaction does make much sense. To me, its ambiguous. 2) At cart, there are items - hence deletion should happen on each line item (product). 3) In special ...


7

I would like to add something from my perspective. Aged 36 I could fall into your target group. I don't know about localization in your case, but living in Baltics my order of thought and reading from left to right is Price - Discount = Price I pay and only then Quantity I buy. In your case it does not mach my order, that makes me "uncomfortable" and I ...


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