2

I suggest you keep the navigation menu visible at all times. The current design could hardly be called obtrusive. Even with notification icons I wouldn't imagine it would be much of a distraction, and in the event that the notification icons do draw the users focus... well, isn't that the whole point of them anyway? Any slight benefits that you may think ...


2

I don't think there is a publicly available source for this information. It is normally derived from taxonomy research using a card sort methodology (this link explains more about this (please note this is a link to my agencies website. We are UX research experts): https://ux247.com/our-work/services/taxonomy/) Although not designed for the purpose I have ...


2

If the choice is between the two approaches only I would go for the first one. You say, that the users are experienced users (admins) who will use the tool over and over again. What I would recommend is to not only use the picker as an input tool but mark the chosen dates an even differentiate the repeating dates from the one time dates. So the date can be ...


1

Advice I don't see a major impact that it is going to bring to the product. Hence either of these should be fine. Always spend more time simplifying the core problem of the product. Arguments for Option 02 One of the principles says "User spend most of their time in other products, hence we should preserve their mental model to reduce their learning ...


1

The solution definitely depends on how close modules are related to each other from interface and architectural points of view. If integrated module is just one item in application's main menu and is perceived by user as a part of whole application it's better to have its setting under one application's Settings section. If module acts like a kind of plugin ...


1

I would certainly place settings close to he user tasks. This exposes the settings in small quantities at the exact time the user might be interested to change it. Going to the big settings section and doing mental gymnastics trying to link the settings to their features is extra effort that will make many users not use the settings. Sysadmins do not have to ...


1

Making the settings available only after having completed an onboarding does not seem a good solution. You are afraid that users will be lost when confronted with these settings. But to force the user to complete an onboarding seems quite patronizing. It always should be in the users choice how to proceed. Onboarding is not always a good solution either. It ...


1

Profile Along with settings such as name and email. If there is no profile, I would go to settings. Settings is usually more about settings of the application (language, dark mode).


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