43

Both the icons convey a different meaning; even if they tell a user that there are additional options underneath. A gear icon is derived from a traditional mechanical sense of gears and cogs defining a operation or a physical constraint. You can find additional details from the following answer: Why is the settings icon either associated with gears or a ...


38

Traditionally the operation of a mechanical tool was determined by the physical constraint of the position/type/size of the gears used. So if you wanted to change a tool setting, you would have to manually make an alteration to the gear(s). Many machines worked this way, even ones you would not think of, such as printing presses, folding machines, etc. ...


28

I believe you are referencing a Navigation Drawer.


22

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13

Make the decision for them. Think from the user's perspective, not from the system's. Yes, you have 108 scales, and you could turn them all on and off individually, but apart from making the screen too complex, what user has such specific knowledge of their own needs? What pianist can really decide for each of a 108 scales whether they want to practice them ...


12

I believe the gear icon symbolizes opening something up to look at its "guts" to see how it operates on that inner level. Changing the direction of a single cog causes changes the motion of the next gear, and so on, meaning this is where you can make changes to how the system will work. Since a tool is a device used to carry out a particular function, the ...


12

All the product owners I have interacted with have called this either a fly-out nav or, less formally, a hamburger menu. Although w3 considers fly-outs to be more akin to header drop-down menus: W3 Fly-out Menus It's usually punctuated with the hamburger looking menu icon and supports slide gestures when available as you described. Consider this gallery ...


11

There are several complementary approaches... ...to reducing complexity. Effective design often relies on an appropriate mix of multiple approaches tailored to your user base. For example, Eclipse users (in another answer here) tend to be professional/expert users who understand how to navigate complexity and may want a lot of control. Google Chrome ...


8

There's a few discussions on it already around the web. They are very similar. 'Preferences' usually control the settings of your personal favorites -- things of little consequence -- like color of font, type size, background photo... -- usually personal prefences. The tern 'settings' is much broader and can impact system issues -- ram size, ...


7

As a matter of fact I'm quite sure that between the wrench and the kebab icon there was a hamburger. Either way, the most likely reason for the icon is consistency . This kebab menu icon is the same they're using in Material Design, so they're basically following their own guidelines, see Menus section in MD A menu is a temporary piece of material that ...


7

I'd try hard to add subheaders. Yes, these are all "Notifications", but they are notifications regarding different events. For example, something like the following may work better (obviously make your own decisions on what logical groupings make the most sense for your scenario/audience). Additionally, note the last two options. I personally thought it ...


6

No. Always allow the user to opt-in. You could prompt the user the first time the app is ran, with a message explaining why it would be a great idea for them to join, but I would default off. Automatic opt in causes the PERCEPTION of your app to be "shady" for some people. This perception has a big influence on the total UX. And what's more - this can, ...


6

The gear symbolizes “the inner workings” of a machine. The screwdriver in Windows 95 is not conceptual, it is literal. To get at some of the system settings, you had to unscrew the box and manually set hardware switches on the motherboard or a daughterboard, sometimes in concert with setting virtual switches in the Control Panel.


6

Separate the settings that can be changed directly from those that need to be saved. Create an "Additional Settings" option, and place it above the settings that can change directly. When the user clicks on the additional settings, a new screen will appear, displaying the three fields that need to be saved.


5

As a user, is there any benefit in knowing the default value? For pagination, probably not. For some other cases, probably yes. Anyway, if you want to note which value is the default one, you should change the order of your example, so that each value keeps in line: 5 10 (default) 15 instead of 5 default (10) 15 "Site" could be ...


5

If you don't provide the user the possibility to turn off a single confirmation, it looks to me like a bad idea as it will probably be used to turn off a single useless or annoying confirmation without being able to evaluate the whole impact of this action. A better design may be to add a "Don't display this confirmation again" checkbox to each confirmation ...


5

Let's take a look at what other applications do Applications on macs and windows (from what I recall for windows... been a while since I've used a windows machine) prevent the user from moving forward before they decide whether they want to save or discard changes. The reasoning behind that is because if the user leaves the application, then a modal/...


5

Text label The text label has the advantage over an icon as being more easily understood. That is, if the copy is clear enough. You can be quite sure what action will trigger when you press 'Settings' for example. Icon But icons on the other hand, can be very ambiguous. A 'wrench' for example could mean all kinds of things 'Building tools', 'Settings', ......


5

Remove settings. Period. Ideally, your application has zero settings. Users hate settings, and they take their time away from the core task they are performing. For example, in a drawing app, ideally the user would spend 100% of their time drawing. The way you remove settings is to make design decisions. If your app has an unmanageable amount of settings, ...


5

Profile typically includes information about you that is displayed publicly. Account typically includes information you need to share with the company for them to provide you services. Ex. An ecomm site might store your name in your profile and your payment info in your account.


4

Redirecting the user on the home page is confusing as he didn't ask for it when validating. The most expected behavior is to let him on the setting page, with a success message ('your settings have been updated') and maybe an option to revert the modifications. The thing to consider here is that the user will have to check if his new settings are correct ...


4

I've installed devices that match your description in the past, and to be honest, it was a horrible user experience. If you could rely on WPS, it might not be, but then again, you cannot rely on WPS because tons of routers don't have it, or don't have it in an easily accessible way. You will need to add some other communication port to your device for ...


4

If it’s a permanent setting, so it’s unlikely that users would change it regularly, add it to the settings menu. A user that opens the settings menu and only finds a single setting would hardly be confused (let alone bothered *). Less time configuring, more fun. There is also some value in definitely knowing that there is only one setting. No need to look ...


4

In most video games I have played I find the subtitle setting is in the audio sub menu as it relates most to the audio in the game i.e. you want to read what people are saying. The video sub menu is more concerned with the game graphics and UI.


4

It should always go in 'audio'. Subtitles are not part video / part audio, the subtitle setting is purely a setting for how the audio in the game is treated.


4

There are many reasons why UX designers make this choice A few observations: Settings are usually "out of flow" from the main app. For example, a music app's main flow is selecting and playing music. Settings like file locations, album artwork settings, and themes are not in the main workflow of the app. Settings are visited less frequently, which means ...


4

No, the general assumption is not that preferences are meant to be cleared. I'd say that the opposite is the case: when you need to log in to use an application, you expect the application to remember you when you return. A few considerations: User expectation - most users expect personalisation and a constant experience - especially in the mobile domain ...


4

There are applications where it's appropriate or even expected to have a large number of user preferences / settings; and there are audiences who enjoy having those settings to twiddle. The history of this particular case strongly suggests that yours is not one of those: one-off configurations that came up as different clients requested new features. ...


4

Because smartphones are used outdoors... I suspect it is mostly fashion and showing off, as Koen Lageveen suggests here. However, there is a potential usability benefit. Smartphones are more likely to be used outdoors in bright ambient light. Bright ambient light tends to wash out colors, all other things being equal. If the color saturation were lower, ...


4

Try to put under the same block settings that are related. In the attached image I used checkboxes but you might want to use toggle buttons. Also, as @maxathousand explains more completely in his answer, I would avoid using a negation for an enabled/true value ("Do not send...").


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