Hot answers tagged

63

Do long domain names really effect user experience? Yes, in several ways: Memory Recall Long domains are difficult to remember. A shorter one tends to be more memorable. The mind can only recall 4 things at once in its working memory. Even then, the words need to make sense (and not keyboard mash). Source: http://www.livescience.com/2493-mind-limit-4....


37

While longer than desirable, 27 characters (including .com) is not overly excessive, but yes, long domain names do affect user experience. Some more than others. 'Power users' know how to avoid typing the address if possible. However, there are going to be some users who don't have a browser with a suggestive omnibox there are going to be users who hunt ...


14

Add a specifier in your statement. For example: cheap prices, high quality. It may not be the best grammatically, but it conveys the idea clearly and lets you keep the search term goodness


14

No. People place the most amount of trust primarily in .com, .org, and .gov and secondarily in .net. All other TLDs are subject to additional scrutiny by your users. In addition if I just know your domain, but not the TLD you are using. I'm going to guess, and I'm willing to bet most of your users will guess ".com". .com should always be the primary ...


10

One thing to remember is the concept of people being able to recall about 7 items (established by George Armitage Miller's work on memory) in their short-term memory. If your name consisted of words like: big, dull, hello, car, house; each of these is ONE item because they connect to something already existing in their mental schema/mind. If it is ...


8

I vote no for UX and yes for SEO (with a caveat). If your site requires a sitemap for a user to find their way around, then that's a smell that you have a poor information architecture. I don't buy the argument that they support users who know what they are looking for - like an index in a book. A website and book are sufficiently different that the ...


8

Yes, it’s a good idea. Especially if you notice that there are some misspelled links out there, e.g. if someone links to your login page with /login. instead of /login (because the URL auto-detection of their CMS thought that the dot for ending a sentence belongs to the URL). Preventively adding such redirects is probably not of a high priority, however, ...


7

W3C about here-link. Here-link is the bad idea which become a standard. Check the examples of placing links and decide which way is better. Page on which you are placing the link, nobody will search the page with the word "here". The text inside the link makes huge impact on the list of search results. Do you want to see your site higher in search ...


7

The days of gaming search engines are behind us Build something people will want. Something with a good content to link ratio that shows you're actually giving something to the user. Linking to a blog under the same domain will earn you points for your work. Duplicating across pages will actually hurt you (depending on the algorithm du jour). Do not ...


6

Optimize the page for search results that use the word cheap, but downplay usage of cheap in the actual content. (You could try putting the word cheap in the site's meta tags. Also add it in hidden transcript tags for images.) Maybe even use the word in a headline to grab attention, but in the product description, use synonyms instead, such as "...


6

As far as I understand, Page 1 on pagination is not always about Latest or oldest entries. Instead, it is about the most relevant entries to your query. The results & orders will change based on your query & it's relevance. If you select to sort the result by Latest, then page 1 will hold the latest items. If you select to sort in ascending order, ...


6

Short answer: yes. Extended answer: Yes and no. The main problem here, which I think has been made clear, is that for you to identify all of the possible mistakes (which is hard to plan for) and redirect them all is more effort than it's worth (unless you're Google, but even then...). An alternative solution would be to create a 404 page that offers ...


6

The SEO Guy should be doing SEO, not design This is less an SEO vs, UX issue, than a problem where your SEO guy thinks he knows more than he does about how to design a site. I'm a big fan of breadcrumbs — where they make sense. Here, they don’t. As you mentioned, the site isn’t “deep” enough to warrant them. Worse, clicking the “Home” button on the ...


5

I think the CMS designers are probably right. The problem is that it is perfectly possible that certain pages are not valid in other languages - the entire site structure MAY be different between languages, and so the current location is not necessarily valid in a new language. Of course, your particular site may well be identical across languages, but if ...


5

I don't think there is a significant difference between these two url from the perspective of SEO. if you want to improve your SEO by telling search engine crawler the language you are using, using html meta tag is a better approach: < meta http-equiv="Content-Language" content="en"> Furthermore, I don't think bothering users with "which language do ...


5

Probably the most common marketing copy to describe this is "most bang for your buck" (though I believe that's mostly an American saying). "Affordable" also conveys the low price without as explicitly implying low quality. If you could say it's "affordable performance/etc" you could imply you give performance/good feature, but at a low price. The good old ...


5

Do long domain names really affect user experience? Yes. It will be annoying to your visitors. Remember, most people will visit your site on multiple devices, so they have to type that extralongdomainname.com on each device. It could possibly be detrimental to SEO. (Keyword Stuffing) As a side-note: Be careful with words like "Therapist" which, in a ...


5

My son's preschool has a long url for their website, the full name of their school, seven words mashed together. In theory, that's easy to remember and non-ambiguous, but as a user of their site I hate the domain name and have a hard time remembering it and always find myself asking if it was this slightly shorter version, that other slightly shorter version,...


5

The only reference to research which I found was on the site usability.gov which did some research on optimal url names for government organization. To quote the article When the General Services Administration (GSA) changed the names of the U.S. government's official Web portals from FirstGov.gov to USA.gov and FirstGov en español.gov to GobiernoUSA....


4

The title is an important identifier for a web page. It is used in various places by various user-agents, not only by browsers and search engines. Think, for example, about bookmarking (i.e. a list of linked titles). The title "About" wouldn’t be very helpful. Instead, "About – ACME Inc." would work much better. HTML5 defines (bold by me): Authors ...


4

URLS in general are case sensitive so you could go and use both. But Users don't tend to write urls capitalized and as far as I've seen most urls use dashes it's also simpler this way to see what words are inside the url. Also note that your example displays a username, it's better to reflect the actual username and you won't be adding hyphens to a username,...


4

The primary argument here is that this is terrible design because it contradicts user expectations - it forces them to make mistakes and will result in confusion and diminished trust. The secondary argument is that anyone who's been listening to Google for the past 5 years will know that prioritizing SEO over UX or usability is ass backwards. Google ...


3

As far as the internal search engine is concerned, if they are searching for 'cheap', its because they either don't know that they can sort by price, or because the interface does not allow them to. The first step in addressing the issue is giving them this ability (and/or making it clear how they can do so). Likewise, you should provide filters for other ...


3

Site maps are still useful in the same way that an index is still useful in a book that has a table of contents. It provides a different way of organizing information. A great website will naturally lead the users to where they want to go normally, particularly if they don't know exactly what they are looking for, but a site map is invaluable for quickly ...


3

If your home page (or first landing page) is not intuitive enough, then a sitemap will be useful for not-so-tech-savy users. Also, sitemaps always help in making your site more accessible to search engines no matter how much SEO has moved on.


3

Completely agree it is both a usability and accessibility issue and both do matter. Even if you only took the big stick approach that you shouldn't have a choice about accessibility as it's is a legislative requirement in many countries now. If someone is scanning text, then a single word here doesn't stand out or register against the keywords they're ...


3

I think this article has some helpful information: http://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-analytics-adds-split-testing-feature-google-website-optimizer-to-be-discontinued/44398/ Use rel=”canonical” to tell Google which of the test pages is the main page that should be indexed. Once the test is complete, use 301 redirects to redirect users and ...


3

Just bought a few of the new TLD domain names as they fit with certain businesses. For example bought http://www.bagel.coffee for a bagel shop. And bought http://www.Lawyer.coffee for a Los Angeles Family Law Firm. So it really depends on who is going to be using these, and their purpose. My thought is they are good marketing and an easy way to say the ...


3

Context is everything. There is nothing inherently bad about a dropdrown nor does it have "bad UX" it matters how its used to solve a problem. It is a simple picker used to collapse a list into a single line. As long as there is appropriate labeling to the field and it's contents are limited then I see no reason not to use it. As to SEO that may be a reason ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible