65

I am not a fan of the approach you have suggested. I find that having a global toggle can be confusing. The reason for this is exactly why you are unsure and asking this question - because there are strong arguments for it functioning in different ways. I find the best approach is to just have explicit actions for selecting and unselecting all options. ...


11

Personally, I prefer to have it toggled on/off too, depending on the children state. At least with the design above, it makes sense to also change the 'parent' state, because should the user want to toggle everything on/off, they don't have to manually toggle the children state (which n actions), they can just change the parent state (just 1 action).


5

I think it depends on the situation. Selecting all is not only useful for activating all elements, but also for once all have been activated, deselecting only those not required. In the case described in the question with so few options it's somewhat confusing. But in cases of multiple options, SELECT ALL can be very useful. The following example is the ...


4

This is the basic/ typical usage of checkboxes. I don't see the need for a select. By definition, checkboxes are used to let a user select zero, one, or more options of a limited number of choices. To make the user choose at least one option, make the input required. It is not different if you use an input that has the type file or a select, it must be ...


2

Replace the placeholder text "None selected" with "Select at least one"


2

From your question, what I understood was initially nothing will be displayed on the result screen, and the user must select at least one item from the list to proceed? Is that what you are looking for? Usually, the drop-down with the checkbox acts as a filter. If the user hasn't selected any of the items from the drop-down it shows the complete result. If ...


2

I agree with you that options 2 and 3 are not the best. But I see some drawbacks in the option one that knowing them can help you find a workaround: The icons are very small, it's difficult to perceive them The text is too small and cannot be seen clearly The icons are too close together to select The already selected icon is not seen as such (Clubbing) I ...


1

The first paradigm you're describing sounds to me like a 'batch action' or 'batch operation' - applying the same action or operation to multiple items at once. The second paradigm you describe sounded more like 'applying a tool' - the tool conveys certain properties to the items it touches. A lot of products/systems allow these two ideas to be in play at the ...


1

I think you are close to two good options; in both options, you'll want to remove the "Delete" button next to the first dropdown (allowing the user to delete additional dropdowns, but not the first one.) You say that language isn't important, but you might want the Add button to be more like "Add additional country". The version on the ...


1

This indeed is not good UX. Your solution would somewhat reduce at least one problem (searching in the huge list of attributes to find the one you want to unselect). In addition this could be difficult if used on mobile devices (if that's the case). But the problem starts earlier. To pick 10 attributes out of 70 you would have to remember all the 70 ...


1

In my opinion, you shouldn't need to group it with the dropdown list. You can just show it directly, to cut the unnecessary step.


1

Personally I have always seen very confusing: The empty option The action as title Following an order of priorities it should be: Title: the name of the option group to choose from First option: the action to do Options


1

This is a good question that makes ink flow. As it always depend on the context of your form, I would answer with some advices and reading, like: Avoid a reset button on the form, even if you didn't mention this, just as reminder You can make this specific entry resettable, You can offer a default choice that will be always available for the user. For ...


1

This falls under the category of Good defaults vs Validation. What you do here depends a lot on the content you are managing. So let's get straight to the cookies. the user will select at least one item from the list, but can optionally select additional items The user must select at least one item Unless it's paramount for the user to think about the ...


1

I think this should be handled in verification and not be part of the widget logic. The nicest solution would be: A list of checkboxes, one checkbox which is usually taken is preselected. The user can select others and / or deselect the preselected option and is done. If no option is usually taken (or the user deselects all). Then start with the error case ...


1

Lists with checkboxes are for selecting one or more items. If the UI makes it appear to the user does not have to select an item, you can place an asterisk next to the heading and note that items with an "*" are required. If the user fails to select an item, you can show an error message. I agree with an above response that a dropdown box with a ...


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