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Great question! I'm in the midst of addressing an application suite that is being divided from a sales and marketing perspective but more tightly integrated from an experience perspective (for those that buy the whole kit). It's a question of activities Obviously, every added feature in a view complicates info architecture. But when users regularly access ...


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You problem seems to be that you're collecting a number of buttons in the same list that are completely different from each other. Being in a single drop down menu implies a relationship between them that isn't there. Viewing system messages and marking an object as read are so far removed from each other, they should never be part of the same menu. Usually,...


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Well, you can't. If few weeks is all you have, and there is no UX related research, there is little you can do without missing anything important. Breadth rather than depth You'll have to try to focus on breadth (the surface level) rather than depth, since the deeper you go the more research time you need. For instance, to decide whether an action should ...


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Here are a few UX reasons to bundle or separate applications / functions / interactions. Bundle things that are complementary Imagine going to a grocery store that only sold liquid items such as milk, juice, and soda and a different store that only sold boxed items like cereal, and crackers. This would make buying a breakfast of cereal and milk very hard. ...


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The best UX criteria should be dependent on an analysis of the product backlog or feature roadmap from a UX perspective. It’s basically an information architecture exercise. I’ve worked on a number of large product suites over the years for companies like Siebel and Autodesk. With modern web applications it’s important to think about how you’ll enable ...


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Actually, I think the same principles involved in the decision of creating an application can be applied to make decisions about whether or not to combine or separate applications. The first step is to list the requirements from the business, technology and user perspective. The second step is to assign a weighting to each of the requirements. The final ...


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Yes, it looks strange It's strange because it's non-standard. You could move the Search box from your mega-menu to the standard location. Here's a list of interesting articles from the Nielsen Norman Group. It can help you decide where to put the Search box, and how to format it, for best user performance. In particular, here's a quote from this article (...


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I've recently come to the conclusion that making the user's life as easy as possible is a bad thing. It forces extreme design, interface, and development limitations on projects for the sole purpose of making a product idiot proof, often losing the purpose of the product altogether. Considering that, the case for bundling should be as follows: does it ...


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You have to redo your information architecture and put these extra top navigation elements in a hamburger menu (a drop-down illustrated by three horizontal lines).


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Don't bother the user with information about the system unless it directly impacts her. She only needs enough of a mental model to understand how things work with regards to her. (See the Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman for more information on users' mental models.) This means that you should only make minor edits to some of the action names ...


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