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49

On clicking the save button in almost any application for the first time, you are asked where to save the file. If your application does not do this, it would be understandable that people are unsure as to whether it has worked or not. My advice would be to grey out the icon and replace the icon with a spinner while the save operation is taking place. Even ...


45

If I understand you correctly, you have a window that automatically saves changes for the user as they adjust items. Currently you have a button that say "Close" on this window. Your clients are requesting you to rename this to "Save and Exit". But since the save action has already happened while they're making the changes, the button really just closes the ...


38

A save button should always save everything. Accidental data loss is about the worst thing that can happen to users. This is why many applications (e.g., GMail) don't even have save buttons; they just auto-save everything. If technically feasible, auto-saving is an even better solution (as long as there is an effective undo). Note: when auto-saving, it is ...


38

It depends on your application structure, but in general tabs are precisely made to have more than one opened at a time. Therefore, it would be pretty annoying to always notify the user when he switches tabs. A common solution would be to keep the status of each tab and display a "modified" indicator inside the tab headline. E.g. in IntelliJ a modified ...


36

Export is often used for file formats which don't support saving your current editing status. Word let's you save .doc, .docx, .odt and so on, but only export .pdf, .html and similar. Same with gimp: You can save .xcf, but only export .jpg, .png and the same. The reason for this is that with any other file format than .xcf gimp loses data like layers which ...


27

As you've stated, it's important that the user is provided with feedback about the success / failure of the save operation. One way that some business applications achieve this is by disabling the save button when the most recent version of a file has been safely saved to disk. User clicks save. File is saved. Button is dimmed / non-clickable -> this ...


23

To "star" something is a very abstract concept hardly familiar outside Gmail. While people save things for later all the time, they hardly ever "star" something. While the star as an icon is fine, it doesn't translate well to a verb or action. Marking things for later reference is commonly offered through either "bookmarks" or "favorites". Here, favorite is ...


23

The system should help the user but should not restrict the user. If the user indeed wants to search something, the user should be able to. Warning the user that this will result in losing information and afterwards giving the user the opportunity to copy his or her work (or maybe saving a concept version of it for later review?) should then be the best ...


19

Even though [cancel] would not actually clear or cancel any concrete data, in the user's mind it confirms, that none of the values he changed in the dialog will be saved/applied. The [x] should generally always be there, it works as some sort of "way out" for the user, it gives the option to skip the choice and intuitively get out of the situation (for ...


19

I would recommend going with an approach like Facebook has i.e. section level edits. If you look at Facebook's design, If I click on Edit for a specific section only that section becomes editable and a person can edit what ever fields he wants and ignore the rest. I strongly recommend against going for a inline edit for each and every field as that would ...


18

Firstly, from your description, it sounds as though when your users click the button, they are not saving, they are publishing (which has the side effect of saving) - so the button should be labelled 'publish'. Secondly, you are merging two decisions into one, when they should be kept separate - mainly for clarity, but also because more choices require more ...


15

I think the word "Save" is in the same category as the floppy disk icon itself. I don't think your analogy of comparing "Save" to "Post your Question/Answer" here on Stack Exchange is valid, "Post" means "Publish to the website", whereas "Save" would mean "keep a copy until I'm read to publish". In fact this is probably the meaning most people have in mind ...


15

Depends on how you are approaching the concept. I can call it a WATCHLIST. What exactly do you want the user to do. Create a list of jobs so that they can visit again and check them. Yes it works same as a favorite but the term doesn't suits the purpose of job searching. A person cannot have a favorite job post. I will rather have 2 options for the user. ...


15

A "save" function should be expected to yield a file which, if opened later in the editor, will yield one that precisely matches what was saved. An "export" function is appropriate in cases where the file will be target format's best representation of the data, but the target format may not necessarily be capable of holding all of the information in the ...


14

Adding a Save button to your auto-saving window would be a bad idea. It would suggest to the user that closing the window without pushing Save would revert the changes — which would be wrong, and highly misleading. Then remains the fact that the users are worried that their changes could be lost. You should add a discreet message saying "Saved" when ...


13

You pretty much want to go for one or the other extreme, where the extremes are: Explicit Save for Everything. Everything needs saving through an explicit command. Autosave Everything. Everything is saved automatically and instantly. You want the user to have as simple a mental model of the system’s behavior as possible. You don’t want to burden the ...


12

Well, since you're new to UX, you should probably learn one thing first and that is that IT DEPENDS :) If it's something I'm going to use a lot and you can automate it for me: yes please. I might feel smart the first time I set up a wi-fi connection, and it might make me feel in control of what my computer does for me, but it's going to be a major pain in ...


11

Redundancy isn't always a bad thing. Sometimes, having multiple ways of accomplishing the same task helps accommodate users who are used to different patterns. In this case, the candidate for redundancy removal is [X] not Cancel because your modal dialog is an editable form, which has a Save button already so the counter-action has to be next to it (as you'...


10

I don't think this has been mentioned by anybody, but one instance when you must NOT implement the Auto-Save functionality is when you're working with files opened from a USB memory stick. Although not widely known, but USB drives have a very limited amount of read-write cycles, sometimes as low as 3000-5000 (see Wikipedia: USB flash drive)). If your ...


9

To save a file is not drastic or dramatic, and it never was. It does not suggest that the work is about to be lost. To think this is to confuse two different non-technical meanings of the word save. To save can mean to redeem or rescue, but this is not what it means in everyday computing. Save also means to keep, to hold on to, to retain. When you save ...


9

There's a good reason why this is uncommon (I'd say non-existant): Consider this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups What happens when you press 2? Do you get 2? Or do you get 12? The obvious answer is that you get 2, because the affordance of a button or a menu item is an individual action trigger. Here's another ...


9

Can you support auto save in this context? As long as users don't experiment with the data it would smooth the process. Make it even faster by providing a key sequence for the next button. If that would work, you can just have a status indication immediately adjacent to a 'next item' button, like the pattern illustrated below. If you need to allow undoing ...


8

What if you didn't worry about 'save' status on an individual tab level, place the Save/Submit button outside of the tabset and let users save the entire tabset as if it were one page, instead of requiring users to save on each tab?


8

When someone is creating a new entry, you need a way for them to abandon that entry and not create anything. In iOS apps, there are two ways of doing this: Have a 'done' and a 'cancel' button. This is the clearest option as you are explicitly offering the actions to the user. However, you still have do decide how the 'back' button behaves. Does it act ...


8

But it's not a Save action though, is it? The feature you describe sounds very much like the conventional Favorite feature. The user marks an item of interest to have it easily accessible at a later point. The item is still accessible even if the user doesn't mark it, but then the user has to manually look it up again. This does not sound anything like a ...


8

Each of the words has a distinct meaning and implication, and they should be used only in that context. 'Save' has no indication of quality. You are simply stating that you want to have it available for later. 'Star' indicates that you are flagging an item to more easily find it and do something with later. Think of starring an email in gmail here - it's ...


8

I would argue no - this triggers alarm bells as to: 'what have I actually done?' and is not common practices with most software products. However Excel is a bit of a weird fish when it comes to this - it could be dependant upon the macros within the sheet, here is an interesting thread discussing the same issue. https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/...


8

You say: I've decided for tabs (instead of a wizard) due to the fact that the user might not fill it all out in one go, but rather re-visit and edit it from time to time. So you have a hefty task where more will need to go into a handholding experience than even the typical wizard. In other words, you'll need to build in more prompts and explanations than ...


8

If you Save a file, then continue editing, you will be editing the file you just saved. If you Export, you won't continue editing the file you exported, but the previously saved file. It's a subtle difference because you don't actually edit a file until it's saved/exported, but this is how the user sees it.


8

This answer is inspired by Paul S above. Here is WordPress's save / preview / publish widget Most CMSs and blogs have something similar.


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