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131

Letting the user know that there's not much useful information found is useful information. If you don't show the search results list in case there's only one result, you save the user some time – but I doubt the user will actually appreciate it. The user basically doesn't know whether there's only one result – or if there's an inconsistency in how the ...


52

Do not auto-redirect user. Remember to let the user have the control on your sites. Make them the ruler of your site. The user might also want to revise their search terms. As a user, when I tried to search for common items and got 1 result, I might feel something wrong with my search terms. I would tried to generalize the search terms. On another case, ...


39

Microsoft's MSDN Guidelines claim: Preserve user selections through navigation. For example, if the user makes changes, clicks Back and then Next, those changes should be preserved. Users don't expect to have to re-enter changes unless they explicitly chose to clear them. See source Rightly so, IMO.


34

Consistency is important in UX This is a general principle but it's especially true for consumer-facing sites where users may be new or have varying levels of familiarity. In real life, when you open your fridge to start cooking you expect to see food inside. It's confusing and cognitively dissonant if you open your fridge a second time and see a stovetop ...


33

I work at Stripe on the Checkout team. Many people integrating Checkout do not have mobile-optimized websites. The reasons for this vary, but a common observation is that there are various nuances for the getting the right viewport. Many websites using Checkout do not have the viewport meta tag; this puts a modal implementation at the mercy of the browser ...


13

It also depends on the kind of search, for example if the user is searching for a customer number in a CRM. When entering that number while on the phone with a customer, the number is unique and the user expects one match. He/she will probably find the result list redundant. A partial number may return the search list for further exploration.


11

Preserve the information when you can. Consider the 3 data entry pages as one big form that you happen to split into three. As the user completes one section/page, that part should be treated as completed as they move forward. If they move back, they should see what they saw when they left the page - the information that they entered/selected. You'll ...


11

If the application is for providing exact items for which users may know the title, redirect to the item but provide a means to show the full search results. Wikipedia does this if you search for an article with the exact name of your query unless you navigate to the full search results. This is useful because the user will most likely want to visit that ...


8

If users find themselves trying to get to the Log In and Sign Up page by typing the URL in manually than they really must want to get there for some reason. I would first make sure that you have a log out button somewhere readily available on the app so that if they did log out they could proceed to that page. However, I think that you are doing it correctly ...


8

Yes, it’s a good idea. Especially if you notice that there are some misspelled links out there, e.g. if someone links to your login page with /login. instead of /login (because the URL auto-detection of their CMS thought that the dot for ending a sentence belongs to the URL). Preventively adding such redirects is probably not of a high priority, however, ...


7

As has already been expressed in other answers on here, the reasons not to redirect include: The user expects to see a results page (consistent with other search operations) The user expects to be able to evaluate the results of the search The user is likely to become disoriented by the page redirect and think that the search may have failed. Google did ...


6

I would love to say I'm 100% sure of this. But, as a user I would still expect to see the result list. I did a search, nothing in the UI is telling me that only 1 search result is found. If I am redirected right away to the only result, it my be confusing as I'm not sure if I did the search in the first place. This very however, very dependant on what ...


6

Short answer: yes. Extended answer: Yes and no. The main problem here, which I think has been made clear, is that for you to identify all of the possible mistakes (which is hard to plan for) and redirect them all is more effort than it's worth (unless you're Google, but even then...). An alternative solution would be to create a 404 page that offers ...


6

Logging out should take the user to a dedicated log out page Logging out is a particular task users will do, and should be treated like any other. It needs its own page, which should accomplish the following: Let the user know they have successfully logged out. (If the user is taking the time to log out, privacy is important to them. You want to assure ...


5

I'd take the following into account: User loyalty Take into account whether or not you "owe your users an explanation". Are there a lot of frequent buyers, that will feel slighted because you didn't explain what happened here? It's sort of a "protect your brand" exercise. Shock value Did you change from expertsexchange into stackoverflow, from audi.com ...


5

I've run into this issue before and I actually have a different answer. In my case, the list of items is that user's own list, so keep that in mind. I do redirect the user automatically, but include a notice at the top of the page informing the user that "There was only 1 record which matched, so you were automatically directed to it. Click Here to see ...


4

Users can't know everything As others have noted, you want the user to be in control and fully aware of their site flow. On the other hand, the system should know more about what's available than the user. That's what computers are for, right? The system knows, for example, that if they would only have changed one word in the search, they'd get 5x the ...


4

Be weary of mixing form buttons and navigation links. A user will likely think 'Back' button is a navigational item not a form submission. Assuming button click = server trip to save data. The confirmation page is probably the best page to put a back or 'Update' link. The summary of highlighted issues links them to areas needing respective updates. If the ...


4

I have not encountered an issue like that before, but I have encountered a more malicious experience that is similar. We had several websites that were taking our eCommerce product images and linking them to provide product images for their own website. (Hotlinking for those of you who are familiar with the term.) In your case, you have benevolent ...


4

Redirecting the user on the home page is confusing as he didn't ask for it when validating. The most expected behavior is to let him on the setting page, with a success message ('your settings have been updated') and maybe an option to revert the modifications. The thing to consider here is that the user will have to check if his new settings are correct ...


4

It depends on what the typical user has come to your site/app for. Redirecting to the homepage may not be the best option when a user profile is available for example - where the information displayed is most relevant to them. A good example of this would be the current MySpace (not the new MySpace currently at the invite stage), The user may navigate to ...


4

I agree with the above answers in general to not do it. However, there are always exceptions. If you search in the JIRA (issuetracker) webapplication, you get the list of results, unless you directly type an issue key (in the form of PRJ-123). In that case, it would be annoying to show the list, since as a user you expect to exactly match 1 issue.


4

In the US, alcohol advertising is regulated by state and federal guidelines, as well as industry standards for self-regulation. For example, the Distilled Spirits Council has a set of guidelines for responsible digital marketing. Here's what they say about age verification: Age affirmation is a process or a mechanism by which users provide their full ...


3

Modal windows to show more data is a bad idea. You lock the view from other elements in the page, which will make data consumption difficult for you users. Accessing more information from three different boxes in your design require six click, and the overview is lost. Open A, Close A, Open B, Close B, Open C and Close C. You also add massive cognitive load ...


3

I would be weary of a domain redirecting me to the app store straight away as I would feel like I have less control over the end to end experience. Also how do I know that the app I am being redirected to is the correct one and not a malicious one? A simple landing page with links to both the App Store and Play Store is better because then the user knows ...


3

Stripe Payments are a painless integration. By that, I mean they are incredibly easy to install/setup/implement for developers. Most other solutions that brag about the same ease of install redirect to a different website on desktop, and do not work well on mobile. Arguably, they have better conversion rates and more seamless integration than most of their ...


3

In general, I like PhillipW's idea of providing two buttons on the log-in page, but due to the name "Dashboard", I would recommend always taking users there first as a landing page (that's what's communicated in my mind by a "Dashboard"). There can be a large, easy to find button that takes them to the Report System from the Dashboard. Also, there could be a ...


3

Yes, that's extremely common. In most cases, the modal would have the equivalent of OK and Cancel buttons (albeit with different labels) with the OK leading to a new page and the Cancel closing the modal and staying on the same page. In your case, it looks like you'd have the primary action button at the bottom leading to the new page, and the close/cancel ...


2

Any page where they need to be redirected either way should have it. For example, a login page usually redirects to the index with a success message on the top, that makes sense. Whereas a comment page usually just loads a success message on the top since it just refreshes that same page to show your comment. It all depends on what type of form it is, where ...


2

It depends on your application and what your customer is most likely to want to do after logging in. For example, when I log into gmail, it takes me directly to my inbox as most of the time this fits my intent in logging in. However when I sign into Amazon, I am simply shown the Amazon home page, which also makes sense. Try to show your customers the page ...


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