9

Torture! I'm sorry not to answer your question directly, but I'm actually quite alarmed by the the whole idea... So your friend has decided to put high-school teenagers through the torture of having to answer 160 questions? Does he or she has any idea how cognitively demanding such a task may be? (PS, to get a faint feel for it - please go ahead to the ...


6

You could try to gamify the process I didn't try this, it's just an idea but long questionaries are usualy arduous work with delayed gratification. You could try to give back small value every couple qustions. In psycho-tests, you could give a partial response after each 10 questions: "It seems that you have attentive personality. How would you react in ...


4

Concerning the second question, Blažica & Lewis detail their method of translating SUS to Slovenian in their paper A Slovene Translation of the System Usability Scale: The SUS-SI. They use method of back-translating and psychometric evaluation to validate the translation. There were three stages in the translation process. First, 10 reviewers from the ...


4

While Jeff and Measuring U do own the rights, they also say "You are welcome to use the SUPR-Q questions without purchasing the SUPR-Q license. Please simply cite this reference (Sauro, 2015)" What you miss out on by not purchasing is the calculator and the industry benchmarks. For more details visit MeasuringU website.


4

4 pieces of survey design advice Is your survey super short? Are you expecting most people who take it to be on a mobile device? Then include all questions on one page. Is your survey long (but hopefully not too long)? Spread questions out onto a few pages. But! Don’t show only one question per page—you’ll end up with way too many pages. Does your survey ...


3

If I were committed to answering 100 questions, I'd have the following desires (some reactions are overly dramatic, but I think the points remain): I want chunks. Don't just sit me in front of a web page with 100 questions... I'll get overwhelmed and feel like I have so much work to do. Help me digest it a little at a time—maybe 10 questions per page. This ...


3

I had similar kind of requirement for one of the projects I was working on. Hence we settled for this type of grid system and layout. Hope this helps your query. This is very basic structure so do let me know if I am wrong, I can help you with it all the way. If you don't have the whole page dedicated to adding questions, then you can try this approach. ...


3

I think you're over complicating things. Different languages have different ways of displaying information. If a language, say: Greek, or Hebrew, or Arabic or Chinese doesn't use the A,B,C,D notation structure then use what is most commonly used in that language. If Greeks use α, β, γ, δ instead of A, B, C, D then use α, β, γ, δ. How do you find out ...


3

Use radio buttons to indicate the choice, use strikethrough to indicate the wrong answers.


2

Second approach looks simpler to me with a little change. See attached image which provides more clarification. See a sample image from Interaction Design Foundation Quizzes (https://www.interaction-design.org). The way they are showing correct and incorrect answers is really user-friendly.


2

It depends on how the questionnaire was created. Many questionnaires are just thrown together and you can do whatever you like to them - as many people who have used SUS have shown. SUS is like a raft: it won't sink but the quality of the ride is terrible. QUIS is slightly different in that it tries to target different aspects of the system being evaluated. ...


2

"How many long have you been using [the product]?" - what do you expect this question to reveal? "How would you rate your overall familiarity with [the product]?" - what do you expect this question to reveal? "What is, in your opinion, the core purpose of [the product] in your environment/organisation?" - what do you expect this question to reveal? "What ...


2

Ultimately, I think this is a perfect candidate for some user or A/B testing, but I'd also consider a third option, depending on your audience and application's tone: natural language sentence construction. This would allow you to disguise your Boolean questions as a natural language response that might seem more friendly and less like a survey. With each ...


2

Sounds like leveraging a tool like the Five Second Test from UsabilityHub could be useful here. We show your design to people for five seconds. When the time is up they're asked questions about what they remembered. There is also Chalkmark from Optimal Workshop. Reveal first impressions of designs and screenshots


2

I suggest you use the System Usability Scale. This is a 10-question, Likert-scale survey used to measure respondents' assessment of the usability of any system. The survey does not explicitly ask about "information overload", but its questions address related concepts: On a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = strongly agree and 5 = strongly disagree I ...


2

It's proportional to the decision making time. when browsing through photos, one would expect no delay. The brain is super-efficient with images. when answering questions, one would expect a simple, short transition, mostly as a visual confirmation and acknowledgement. Same principle applies to how complex the question is. For simple "Yes" "No" ...


2

Here's a few examples of User Experience Surveys. http://edutechwiki.unige.ch/en/Usability_and_user_experience_surveys They are generic usability survey instruments and can be adapted to specific products. You can go through the individual questions and use the ones that you think are better suited for your product. PUEU and USE look like they would work ...


2

Obviously the more options you present, the more likely it is that they will use them rather than just selecting "Don't Know" - unless they actually don't know the song of course. So directly answering your question, yes it will help if you have more options. However, if you are asking a user to rate a song then you should opt for a more familiar ...


2

This is called a Likert Scale. From MeasuringU: As a general rule, when measuring a construct that falls on a continuum from low to high (such as satisfaction, ease, and likelihood to recommend), the more points you have in your rating scale, the more reliable (consistent responses) and valid (reflects true attitudes) it generally is. The bluntness of ...


2

Just a humble input, not study. You are right that cognitive load should be minimal so this results in more reliable information from user. In general question is better because user have to mentally transform statment to question and then answer it. But you may see that web forms (and not only) are mostly made with short labels and not with questions. This ...


1

You could also consider a third option to the two that you've proposed. When the user completes the questionnaire, show them a useful summary of their results on the web page. You can then prompt them to enter their email address so that they can be sent the full PDF report. I've seen this work well as it doesn't annoy the user by answering 35 questions and ...


1

I would be concerned that using a pop-up or intercept form whenever the user decides to download the free product would lead to user abandonment ("Oh, now I have to fill out a form? Forget it."). If the free product is a limited or demo version of another product offered on your website, I feel it's appropriate to ask them for a short set of questions, but ...


1

First, the order of questions need to be logical. If you ask specific questions first, then more general questions on the same topic, the respondent might get annoyed and think "I've already answered that question!" If the very first questions are too complex (and quite often, the more specific and interesting questions for researchers are also the most ...


1

Some resources recommend the "Funnel Technique" for survey design as well. Intended to maximize the insights on important questions and reduce the possibility of fatigue before the end of the survey: The most difficult questions are placed in the middle – those that take time to think about and those that are of less general interest. At the end, we again ...


1

A simple and very often used method would be the Likert scale a.k.a 1-5 scale. This would be useful for explicitly measuring the cognitive load of a set of UIs. This option is cheap and easy to implement. From your comment, you seem to prefer to take implicit and quantitative measurements. Unfortunately these are a little less accessible, more expensive ...


1

Perhaps the "trigger" questions (i.e. the questions that produce follow-up questions) can be numbered, but the follow-up questions can have a secondary numbering system. This would enable you to omit the dependent questions when they don't apply without causing any jarring renumbering or causing the user to feel like they missed something. For ...


1

Your first option seems to be best if you want to be hassle-free: It's conditional, meaning you end up with very few questions which are very easy to answer (low cognitive load). Users are more likely to answer at least the first question since it's so easy to do. You could make some of the questions slightly playful by not only using yes/no answers. For ...


1

I'd say "it depends": on how much time you want the user to spend on your questionnaire Asking one closed question gets you the answer very quickly, which is in most cases the first thing that comes to the person's mind while several answers possible forces the user to read all possibilities first, then think on what suits best and maybe they can select ...


1

Numbering the question would make more sense since this is a questionnaire. This would help the participants know their progress.


1

Instead of asking "Which of the below do you do most often? (select multiple if applicable)*" and "What are the most common tasks you do when using [the product]?", I would ask "How often do you perform xx task?" and list out each task the product does. I'd also ask about the user's role at work.


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