53

Use either Responsive Disclosure or Responsive Enabling depending upon the standards in the format you're working in. Responsive Disclosure would mean first showing a radio button like this... download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups ...and then revealing the additional option in the whitespace if the user selects no, like ...


53

Neither. Settings are different from questions. This may seem obvious, but it drives a difference in UX design. Yes and No may be reasonable answers to a question: Are you a muggle? Yes / No However, in your case you are really asking the user to make a setting. For settings, don't make the user think too much: Describe what the radio button does instead ...


25

I don't think this is about user intuition - it's much more about writing style and conventions. The norm in forms is that the heading serves a category label to the adjectives/nouns below. So Car Features should do the trick here. Another norm is to use imperative statements, but mostly for interactive controls (not labels), still you could also phrase ...


17

Had to deal w/a similar issue last year. Our task, which we couldn't change, was to convert an 11-section, 120-question "learning style" survey PDF into an interactive quiz. The original PDF is a daunting 10-pg list of questions & checkboxes, much like your example, which no student really wants to complete. Our solution was to break it up by ...


13

You could always use a Mad Libs style: I drive a [Color v] [Brand v].


11

I don't think either of these is the best option. Do you have to go with one drop down? I would prefer to see two. The first would display and the second would be hidden until the user selected either yes or no from the first. Once selected the second would display with the appropriate options.


10

As you mentioned if the option B doesn't include the question I would go with A) because the question is simply enough to admit a Yes/No answer, plus the explanation next to the option is the expected and not something that really needs to be cleared before the user accept, the question already states the final consequence. Also, you could use an alternative ...


9

If you ask this question, I suppose you're among the happy persons who have never read comments on YouTube or any social media. If: Users are encouraged to contribute (no matter how, would it be by gaining reputation/points, or receiving an e-mail “Hey, there is someone who needs your help on an article you purchased recently,” or anything else), They do ...


8

Shorter survey will equal more completions. Since shortening the length is out of your influence, the following considerations will make it more likely to be completed. they are predicated on BJ Fogg's Behavior model. The formula is B= MAT. Behavior is a result of Motivation,ability and the trigger. Present the trigger to people in the right state of ...


5

Disclaimer: without more info as to what this is regarding, it's hard to say for sure. The following is based on gut feel. "I have a car..." feels more appropriate when it's contrasted with other sections, like "I have a motorcycle..." or "I have a bus...", perhaps with a top heading of "What kind of vehicle do you own?" That makes it easy to find the ...


5

I don't see anything wrong with using a partial sentence ending in an ellipses as a user prompt if the answer you're asking the user to input is a natural ending to the sentence fragment in your label. As you currently have it, the prompt and answers don't make a proper sentence: I have a car... blue Toyota Compare that with: My car is a... blue ...


5

There is already a an interface in hardware design where a potentiometer or rheostat has a switch at one of the ends of the range. In some cases, it is used as an on/off switch, e.g. for a cheap amplifier where there is a singular control (volume). I would suggest having a similar control where sliding all the way to one side provides feedback that the ...


5

I will suggest you go with radio buttons over slider, because sliders lack the very important features such as: Precision, Speed, Cognitive Load etc. Here's a fantastic study done on this topic (the article is a little long but trust me, you will enjoy the read and findings): Exploring Slider vs. Categorical Response Formats in Web-Based Surveys Response to ...


5

I'm sure there are a LOT of studies on standardized testing that you'd probably be able to find by searching something like Google Scholar, but my first hunch is that it may be a bit distracting and may divide the users' attention to focus on information not directly relevant to successfully completing the quiz to the best of their ability. Users' attention ...


4

Be careful what you're asking the user to provide. The application in this case needs to map things to those legal categories. You may think you're asking "What is your relationship status?", but in this case the application really needs to ask "Which of these legal statuses applies to you?" Because that's what you need to ask, that's what you should ask, ...


4

Radio buttons may not be 'sexy', but they get the job done with no room for user-interpretation. If you have a choice between 2-3 options, then radio buttons are ideal. They ensure that a user sees all their options, and once they make a choice, they can clearly see which option they selected. If you have a lot more options, you'll have to consider using a ...


3

Unless you have a large budget, alternatives to having a person (or group of people) parse the data are potentially complex and unreliable. Card Sort a Folksonomy Card sorting is a simple technique in user experience design where a group of subject experts or "users", however inexperienced with design, are guided to generate a category tree or ...


3

Radio buttons are perfect for asking a question with 1 and only 1 answer. I can assure you, however, that with each radio button click the user will hate you exponentially more and more so anything you can do to reduce clicks is the way to go. Ways to reduce user clicks... If you can reduce the number of options from 5 to 3 that will help. For example: ...


3

You could convert the radio select into a check box and provide a tool tip with additional information about the option (i.e. public = visible on homepage)


3

Only if that's what they've asked for. From a usability perspective - There will be people who don't want the balance to be shown on screen. They could be stood their with their wife / girlfriend, and don't want them knowing just how much money they do / don't have. Also, there may be technical constraints too. To display the balance requires the ATM ...


3

One thing you have to take into consideration is if parts of the form is auto-populated, i.e. when asking for basic information such as name, email etc. All these fields might be filled out instantly and at the same time. So, in order to measure the way you want, do not ask fot that kind of "standard information". And finally but perhaps most important of ...


3

Use radio buttons to indicate the choice, use strikethrough to indicate the wrong answers.


3

I think you're over complicating things. Different languages have different ways of displaying information. If a language, say: Greek, or Hebrew, or Arabic or Chinese doesn't use the A,B,C,D notation structure then use what is most commonly used in that language. If Greeks use α, β, γ, δ instead of A, B, C, D then use α, β, γ, δ. How do you find out ...


3

Understand that you are currently in the user research phase, just like to point out that the way users respond via audio only and video (with or without audio) are very different. And typically people’s attention span on receiving answers via audio or video are less than 5 seconds because audio and visual cues work based on short term memory usage of users. ...


2

1. Less is more Trying to fit more stuff on a single page isn't the goal of providing a good UX. Figure out what the primary task at hand is and only show that. If additional details are needed in rare cases then hide those until the user requests them by clicking a show advanced options toggle button. "Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing ...


2

Why not use ellipsis to ask the user? When you end the sentence with an ellipsis, it looks like part of the sentence is missing. Ellipsis is mostly used to show the user the sentence is cut of. Here is an example of a question were the ellipsis is correctly used: Best aesthetically solution to overflowing data in a table


2

Marriage has both societal and legal connotations. If you're only interested in the legal connotations, then you need to be explicit in that in both the questions and the answers.


2

You're on the right track and you're close to solving the problem - you need to make the users WANT to continue answering questions. What incentives do you have for your users? Money / Discounts to goods and services? Rewards, such as participating in a community? The gamification aspect has to come first. Organizing the questions into convenient bite size ...


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