77

I hope the answer to the question is never. A prototype is meant to be a test. Built using the most "hacky" approach with the least amount of time to get initial feedback on whether a concept is viable. The alpha is something you give to actual users. This is the version, if successful, you hope to build upon to become the beta and eventually the product ...


14

Well, as you say, the obvious answer is to randomize (there are other, more sophisticated ways to do this, but probably too much for what you're looking for). If you use the same pool of participants and show 2 versions in a row, there is no way to avoid stimulus exposure biased results. for this, you need to use a technique called Counterbalancing The ...


12

User performance not user opinions The solution is to do a proper usability test. Don’t show users a prototype and ask them what they think of it. That’s asking them to imagine what it would be like to use the product, which yields unreliable data. Instead, have them use the prototype so they (and you by your measures) know what it’s like to use the product....


11

First, I applaud anyone showing an interest in focusing on the interaction side of design. In corporate UX groups, I find that the one thing that often does fall through the cracks is the interaction design (often due to waterfall development processes). The UI may look stunning, the back end, tight and responsive, but then you put them together and things ...


8

No, it's not always necessary. System-defined screens are not obligatory, and there is no need to reproduce clone pages/elements with minor changes. Alternatives to hi-fi prototypes are lo-fi wireframes, user journey maps, PRDs. Yes, paper sketches/prototypes are legitimate prototypes if they are detailed enough and capture/highlight on all important parts. ...


7

If you are going to be building a responsive site then the chances are that you are going to use Twitter Bootstrap or some other framework for the job. Therefore, you can block out all of your prototypes in static HTML with Bootstrap CSS/JS in the . You can even hook up the buttons if you want to do a walk through, the buttons loading up the next static ...


7

Mostly working self employed / freelancing on website related projects I would say it's the developer/designer's decision if it's a (working) prototype or a (buggy) alpha version. A prototype is never ment to be public while an alpha version robably is. The line between those two is difficult to draw – but for me / with web projects it's the moment when I ...


7

The interface of balsamiq has two main functions: 1 - Stop you from fiddling You won't spend time doing unnecessary things. If there's no option for color or rounded corners, you won't worry which shade or radius to use. 2 - Communicate that it's a sketch. Of these menu mockups, which is more likely to receive comments about the M not being the right ...


6

A wire frame is used to capture requirements, share ideas and to begin to outline the specification and structure. They can be limited to single page diagrams, or more commonly now - a full site. They are akin to blueprints. They can be offline diagrams or more often now, created in a dedicated piece of wire-framing software. A wire-frame is part of the ...


6

The almost six year old study performed by Ying Dong and Kun-Pyo Lee at the Industrial Design Department, KAIST, Daejeon, Korea named A Cross-Cultural Comparative Study of Users' Perceptions of a Webpage: With a Focus on the Cognitive Styles of Chinese, Koreans and Americans compares different cognitive styles based on Nisbetts' research. The study object is ...


6

Although I wouldn't change a prototype based purely on the feedback from the first tester, I would definitely and fearlessly make such a change if I got a majority of the first 4-5 testers revealed a problem. ...and I would stop wasting testers on the old design until that change was complete. Here is why... In UX, Ignorance is precious. Every user only ...


6

A wireframe is a outline sketch of layout. It doesn't look anything like the real finished product. It just shows where the various elements will be. A prototype and a mock-up....there we don't have exact definitions and ways of differentiating them. I would say that "mock-up" to me sounds like something that is still in fairly early stages whilst a "...


6

Wireframes are schematics that display basic elements without going into details. Prototype is a detailed simulation of the future design, often to a point where it's mimicking the interaction. It can be created on paper, with a specific program or by coding up the dummy data and/or services. Mock-up is a class of designs that include both wireframes, hi-...


6

In my 8 years of experience I have never found that this is used consistently, you cannot rely on meaning the same thing if someone talk about a wireframe or a mockup. Especially about Mockups: Some visual designer call a high fidelty visual design a mockup, some UX people call a very low fidelity thing a mockup. I recommend to show examples if you want to ...


6

You don't need every core competency Our professional practice includes many core competencies. Nobody excels at them all. Your strengths can be in two or three of these: Information architecture — how things are organised, based on research, taxonomy, user needs, and so on. Interaction design — based on patterns and standards, cognitive psychology, user ...


6

"Low fidelity prototype" refers to a prototype i.e sketchy and incomplete. You basically collect data analyze & check the feasibility at the early stage. Whereas "high fidelity prototype" refers to a fully functional prototype wherein you provide click-through interfaces. In simple terms, it's the actual product that will be shipped. You should always ...


5

It's also helpful to consider what kind of fidelity you're referring to so that you don't get into the wrong kind of mixed fidelity. "High fidelity" often mistakenly refers to only the graphic design aspect, i.e. static screens and screen states that look more or less production-realistic and not obvious mock ups. The problem is that when evaluating ...


4

This is tedious Yep. It sure is. And, sadly, is typical in a lot of organizations. The solution, ideally, is to stop creating so much documentation. UX should be about improving things, not publishing copious amounts of PDFs that get sent to some lost vault inside of SharePoint. Frustratingly, UX teams--especially in large corporations--tend to be ...


4

Wireframing and prototyping are exceptionally useful and underused tools in the tech world. Website and app wireframes are useful to determine the layout and overall look and feel of each screen or page. Prototyping is an effective tool for validation and as a way to test your development company. Wireframing Wireframing is probably the most well ...


4

Unlike nightning, I hope the answer to the question is always. On detailed designs What else do you give in your design deliverable to developer if not a full specced-out design that ideally has be the same one you've used in your user-testing using prototypes? My experience is that if you leave any stone unturned with your design - ie, any place for ...


4

It does not appear that you are actually testing your prototype at all. You're showing individuals (perhaps not even adequately vetted target users) a paper mockup and asking them "what do 'ya think?" User Testing is a structured observation of the user actually doing. It is a detailed process that involves: recruitment of participants that ...


4

The level of details for paper prototypes will depend on the complexity of the design and interactions required to meet user requirements. This being said, Paper prototypes seem to address basic design problems such as layout of elements and basic workflow. On the other hand if the design the paper prototype is supposed test is complex, both in terms of ...


4

Paper prototyping is a quick and dirty way to do early usability testing. You can do that on a watch UI in the same way you do it for desktop/mobile UIs. Just print out your prototype screens and perform a usability test, swapping out the printouts as if they were live screens. Here's an example (skip to 3:00). See also: Paper Prototyping and Usability ...


4

Its simple. Two basic stages of product design process are Low/High fidelity prototyping (Mainly UX) - Used to test with people and ensure there is nothing missing out in the prototype or If something needs to be changed Final Visual Design (Mainly UI) - One the requirements have been freezed, prototype been tested, you might shift to Sketch and detail ...


4

What is the main task of your users? Is it necessary for them to see the information of the different widgets at the same time? Also, how is determined for each widget which top 4 to show (since they can view more)? If your users will focus only on one part of the dashboard, according to their own tasks (like 'Finances and Billing') I would chose a minimal ...


4

Axure models web interactions so you can make use of :hover and many other browser events in your prototypes. It’s pretty intuitive, this inspector window shows the :onclick event but :hover is in the same menu:


3

Use AxureRP for that. A sample prototype is also available on their forum for that. http://www.axure.com/forum/tips-tricks-examples/8157-parallax-scrolling.html How to use this effect to better influence the navigation and the user experience? If you ask that does Parallax has an influence on user-experience then sure, everything you do in your website ...


3

Or go from sketchy and the UX & front end dev teams working very closely and collaboratively. Always choose that option when available. Wait, let me rephrase that. Always choose that option when available!!! There, that's better. :) The only time NOT to go that route is if you simply don't have any front end developer skillsets on staff to help. In ...


3

This is defined as going "Best shot or battle royale" by the Google Ventures Design Studio in their design sprints. Each approach has its pros and cons, but some factors can help you to decide: "Best shot" allows for a more detailed prototype. "Battle royale" allows exploring new spaces where there are little conventions, and may provide positive surprises ...


3

Speaking as somebody who occasionally sits on the interviewing side of the table I would not care at all what tool you chose to use. Balsamiq. Sketches on paper. Keynote. Whatever. What I would care about was that you could explain the design decisions to me, and that the deliverable does the job intended. If your not sure what kind of artefact and for ...


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