179

Jakob Nielsen wrote an article called Response times - 3 important limits. The basic advice regarding response times has been about the same for thirty years [Miller 1968; Card et al. 1991]. He wrote this in 1993: 0.1 second is about the limit for having the user feel that the system is reacting instantaneously, meaning that no special feedback is ...


76

Imagine you and I are talking to each other in the street. You've asked me if I have the time and with barely any hesitation I look at my watch and tell you. You don't give it a second thought. You then ask my if I can tell you directions to a decent coffee shop. Some options may occur: I instantly start reeling off a set of instructions I appear to be ...


37

Scott Klemmer's rule of thumb is: Answer shorter than a second: No feedback Answer between 1 and 5 seconds: BusySpinner Answer longer than 5 seconds: Progress bar 10 seconds is a long time. You should bring feedback to the user before he/she naturally loses interest in what your software is doing and become frustrated that your software wasted ...


18

Possible redesign below: Notes: Color should not be used as the only indicator to accommodate those with color blindness (Red-Green being very common). I've used different icons as well as different colors for indication. Red has a "finality" to it and might make the user think further action is required to solve the problem. I've made the icon yellow ...


18

I spent some time exploring how other sites deal with downloads, and liked how Google Drive handles them. Here is a screen shot of two downloads simultaneously happening on Google Drive: What I like about this method: While this message box is similar to the Toast idea mentioned in Idea 5, the box is positioned on the bottom of the page, rather than the ...


13

Here are some that came across my mind: The best practice ever is not letting your system freeze at all. Consider better, more efficient serverside. Of course this cannot be done in some situations, but is a good thing to check at the beginning, because no matter how you tell the user the system is busy, it's always better to show that it just works. If you ...


12

According to this article from NNGroup based on cognitive psychology studies: after 1 second the user might start to lose his flow of thought about the current process. after 10 seconds the user will most probably switch his attention on other task We don't want to risk the user switching its attention to something else, so we should display the dialog ...


10

I would consider visualizing courses as individual units in the graph. After all, they are the building block of your degree. Displaying the graph this way will also give a more accurate view of your progress: You can see which courses you have passed, failed or skipped/remaining. You could also display more information about the individual courses on hover (...


8

Idea 2: Small message banner next to button row is good for users not being interrupted with continuing their work if the download will take some time. If the download does take time (I've worked on apps with this same issue), having the message in close proximity to the action they just initiated allows them to see the system status w/o focusing elsewhere. ...


7

Ten seconds and after that I start thinking "this is not working" and I worry in about my credit card being or not being processed or being processed twice if I have to do this again. It is good to change the message after 10-15 seconds to "it is still loading, no need to worry" or any other positively reassuring message. Just an example is sending an ...


6

The same situation is when you display values off the scale. In most cases the most important thing is to show the user that the values are exceeded. Usually exceeded values aren't represented proportionally to the columns lenght. You could see how the problem is handle by personal finance apps, which have budgets functions - in these apps we need to ...


5

Sorry you're all quoting old research. Google has updated this. 125ms the user expects a response of some kind like a loading icon showing up after click. 250ms user starts to notice the action is happening. 500ms the user expects to be updated on response. 1s the user expects the content to be loaded. 10s I give up. Slide 12: https://docs.google....


4

The reason for this is that you most likely are more familiar with left-to-right (LTR) languages, so your engrained progress is moving from the left to the right. People who are more familiar with right-to-left (RTL) languages such as Arabic or Hebrew, are likely to see a progression from the right to left as moving forward. You can see this in common ...


4

Honestly it depends on the context. Sometimes it makes sense to disable specific UI. This happens regularly with ecommerce websites. Once you submit an order, most ecommerce websites worth their salt disable the "Order Now" button (visually still there, but grayed out, user's cursor changes, loading animation appears in the button, etc) to help prevent ...


4

I don't think it is a familiar flow, but it can work. There are a few points. Make sure your hierarchy between main steps and sub steps is very clear. Users must not think there are more steps than there really are. Also make sure there's a clear difference between a completed and an in progress step (like your image already has). The above mentioned ...


4

My solution would be to have the user interface slide a quarter screen to the left (or to the right depending on your preference) revealing a download panel that shows the current state of the various downloads the user may have going at any one moment. This panel would be automatically revealed on the initial download so that the user notices what is going ...


3

Why not simply putting all of the registration process on one single page instead of having severals separated steps ? In my opinion the advantages would be multiple, the user would be immediately aware of how big is the registration form, and of what informations they need to fill it. For example, when the user comes to your registration page, you could ...


3

I would avoid a load page. Send them to a useful page with information or something for them to do, have a notice on the page that the request was submitted and the results will be displayed shortly. Store something in cache that lets your app know you need to keep checking on the process (via ajax). When the process is done, display a notice as such and ...


3

The users may think there is a cap rather than an unlimited amount. Adding a 98 of Unlimited to the indicator would be helpful. I wonder if it might be interesting to show it as a graph like so:


3

I am generally in favour of snackbars, however, there is the chance that the message is missed. Depending on how often users have to download the data, how long it takes to prepare the download, etc., here is another option worth considering. Notice the separate buttons (rather than the segmented control for reasons discussed in Mike M's answer) and common ...


3

I think this is about finding the best design pattern for the information that you want to display, so it is not so much whether there is a better best practice but what the 'progress chevron' is best suited for. When you have a series of steps that are short, linear and involve no other external dependencies, I think this is a good pattern that provides ...


2

Like a train on a journey with a few stopovers. It is late at some point but maybe will catch up on time during his journey. And you'd like to show at which station the train was late during the entire journey. This instantly reminded me of how the mobile app of the railway service here in Germany indicates if a train is on time or late. screenshot http://...


2

There are 2 nice studies on this, as referenced in this article. For progress bars that display % actual progress: Use backward moving ribbings. Make sure that you downplay progress at the start and make it appear to accelerate it at the end. Avoid pauses at the end. For indeterminate activity indicators: Faster pulsing or rotation generates the ...


2

This is what was inside my mind right now, maybe it isn't up to marks: Set a Bar Chart range to 0% to 150% (you can change the max number as you wish) Anything <=100% will be display in normal way. Anything >100% to <=150%, the data label background will be display in yellow color. Anything >150%, the data label background will be display in red color....


2

Another alternative is using Tab, that can you enable or disabled depending of the context. In this example you enable/disable the Step 3. http://jsfiddle.net/V7GTY/2/


2

Progress and feedback: The effects of providing progress feedback to users is well documented and proven to increase task completion rates and overall satisfaction. The rationale hinges on the idea that users who perceive that they are making progress are more likely to complete the task. Consider the following metaphor: A friend tries to encourage ...


2

This is not a research, but a great article for input with lots of examples for progress steps: Progress trackers in web design


2

Asked a similar question last week. Hope you find this useful. timeline for desktop and timeline for mobile As Julia commented it really depends on the context.


2

I completely agree the content should not shift. I would put a message showing the "staleness" of the data, e.g. "Last scanned 10 minutes ago" or "Last scanned on 6/27 at 9:30" This gives the user the context they need to decide whether or not they want to trigger a manual re-scan (or helps explain why something they are looking for isn't shown- it is ...


2

So is your goal: To show the user that he/she only sees a really small percentage of the total set. or To just show the user that there is a filtered set I think you mean 1., otherwise the X out of Y bar would be enough in my opinion. A log(aritmic) scale could be one of the solutions. But maybe better to use the image and emphasize it with the numbers ...


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