Hot answers tagged

75

The Three-tier Pricing Strategy always works because often customers don't know what they need. So in one simple chart, you show them what they can get for different prices. They feel like they have a choice and do not feel like they are being swindled. You want to do business by making the majority of them choose the intermediate one. Much like many ...


31

There are a few reasons behind this... Implicit Option If a customer is deciding whether to choose your product or not, and there is a single option available, then the choice is binary. They can choose to buy it or not. If you present 3 choices, then they tend to forget about the implicit option to not buy the product. Centre Stage Effect When 3 ...


18

My expertise is in motivation theory and educational psychology, so I'll offer my 2 cents up from that perspective then on to the big picture. This is a very old and well studied psychological effect. In its simplest form, it is used by parents and teachers regularly: Scenario 1: Do it or else. You give a kid the choice between doing an assigned ...


15

I actually think your slider idea is not that bad and might be interesting. Depending on how effortless the implementation has to be, it can also be a simple dropdown in the end: Edit Ok, in response to your comment. How about adding a button with an overlay that explains it all in detail. In comparison to a tooltip, this would work well on mobile as well! ...


10

Izhaki's answer pretty much covers everything related to the UX and psychology behind the x.99 pricing. But there's more -- the x.99 pricing is the key to a killer marketing strategy -- figures for discounts and offers are cleverly crafted numbers, which are almost always impossible to reach without buying one extra item. Why? Because discounts are offered ...


9

I've been suggested it might be a good idea to require an email address for the first two plans before showing the price. This would also discourage people from staying on your site. I personally would have to be very motivated to leave my email address on your site for a product which I don't even know if I want. I'm not alone in this and price is one of ...


8

As per the article from UX Movement Place Them in Descending Order It’s a lot easier for users to move down on pricing than it is for them to move up. Start them off at the high-end and they won’t be able to ignore your high pricing plans. Start them off at the low-end and they’ll likely ignore the higher pricing plans and consider only the ...


7

As already noted in some comments, the three-tier product range design has both psychological and economic reasons. I would like to explain the economics a little more. One Tier Imagine you want to offer a service with only one tier. How do you price it? Your market research shows that you will have two groups of customers: professionals who would use ...


7

If you want to avoid the sliders, you can just opt for a very simple grid of checkboxes/radio buttons. Something like this: This makes it very easy for the user to understand exactly which options they are selecting for each language. I suggest adding some additional styling to the selected options to ensure they stand out from the non-selected options. You ...


5

Don't hide pricing information from the buyer, especially if there's a chance that information could inspire them to "Proceed to checkout". Also, if they don't see the savings there, they might go to another site to look.


5

No, I would strongly recommend otherwise. A month or so ago I was searching for a library that was compatible with Xamarin.iOS and Xamarin.Android. Technical stuff aside, I was comparing the product of different companies. Some companies provided a straightforward, fixed price, whereas other companies required you to leave info for a tender. The latter was ...


5

Showing multiple prices should not be an option. You can think a lot of reasons for that, like misunderstanding of users, perception of users, possible longer lists for countries which will be added in the future etc... So, you should show just one price, which leads us to another question: which price? You can find many answers for this another question ...


4

How Do Users Perceive This? People are uncomfortable being forced to take action. (It triggers the reactance response.) When a user is forced to take a specific action to receive information they have normally get "for free", it will create animosity. There is an Amazon discussion with many users who find the "Too Low to Show" ...


4

Given that your marker is going to be placed next to an article I'm assuming that its function will be to draw user attention. Generally speaking you don't want to draw user attention to regularities in your system but rather rarer events which in your case are the free articles. So that would be my preferred choice. I also think that free articles is what ...


4

IMHO, it's similar to asking a user to try your product for free for a few days and then pay x dollars per month/year as the case may be. Here is a link which you might find useful https://medium.com/@elise.musumano/ab-testing-growth-experiments-for-saas-8a2ac2ac97f0 The idea is not to push users to pay but invite them to try and leave it upto them to ...


3

Do you need to depend on calendar months? If so, why do you want to avoid billing the used part of both plans for that month? This is at least fair to the customer and I don’t see why it makes things more complicated. You can combine both amounts in one bill. My phone company does it and it makes a lot of sense to me. Or otherwise you can step away from ...


3

Asking a user for anything is a barrier to entry I've seen some websites ask for a list of friends email before you can use it and see if it is even worth recommending which is ridiculous. Let me answer your question with another question... Would you go into a grocery store if someone at the entrance required your mailing address? If you have ...


3

I know this question is old, and the purpose of misleading prices has been covered, but I don't see any explanations about why donations are round amounts. Simply put, taking donations as whole numbers is more convenient for charities. They don't charge taxes or give change, so they list preset donation amounts without fractions of whole numbers (eg, ...


3

In the USA, people are used to taxes, etc. being added at the end of a transaction, so this is what they'll probably expect. For example, if you buy a coffee in Starbucks, they'll add sales tax on at the till. In the UK, the convention is that B2C shows prices including VAT and B2B shows excluding VAT. VAT is largely irrelevant to businesses, as they claim ...


3

The simple reason is this is a technique used to exploit the cognitive functioning of the brain. $4.99 as opposed to $5 seems less because your brain is reading a 4 as opposed to 5 and naturally chooses to ignore the $0.99 unless you specifically put effort to recognise that $4.99 is just one cent less than $5. Online shoppers usually tend to browse ...


3

I think this is a design question where the overall content and intent of the design needs to be assessed and understood first. By content I am referring to the actual differences between the plans (or tiers) that you are going to display. There would be very little point in showing the information in a table if all three tiers offered very similar ...


3

I think you're already well on your way. 15 services + options is a lot and I think your mockup is already pretty clear. It's hard to circumvent the issue that it will be quite a list. To add on this concept I would advice some sort of counter that keeps track of the price /hour with every option selected. With the starting amount of €12/hour and two options ...


3

Don't put your price inside the interaction point. If I am looking for a price then buttons are perceived as grey matter. I don't expect to find the answer there. I'm looking for specific visual clues: a dollar sign ($), the words "price" or "for only", a number with .99 after it. I can appreciate wanting to be tasteful, but your primary goal is ...


3

Studies done on the effects of price/promotion framing on price expectations and choice indicate that there are definite eCommerce benefits to offering this information to users at the product display page level. Also useful to decide how this information is displayed and whether to use cost saving, percentage saving or a combination of both. Some useful ...


3

My personal opinion would be to use one CTA per item and here is why: One CTA per My thought process: Observe choices I like plan "L" A dedicated button, hoorah! :) I bet if I press that button then the sign-up screen will not force me to choose again Yay! the sign-up screen is clearly marked with what I want, and it even has a <select> box for me ...


3

Many websites utilize "pricing windows" (unofficial term) to segregate what price applies to what service. I have created a basic mockup for you based on your question: Examples: Soundcloud GoDaddy


3

I would go for something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Note that: You show the user all his options The user can clearly see that the option on the right side have the best price. With the text "Currently selected price" you give the user the impression that HE are selecting the PRICE, not that the system ...


3

It is always a good practice to thank your donors and to reward them. For other users, a badge can be an incentive to donate. However, I would not make the color of the badge dependent on the amount of money. I think it is better to convey the message, that every donation is appreciated the same. Otherwise a "poor" user could be discouraged by the fact ...


3

Somthing like this could work.


3

The answer really depends on what the products are, and your business objectives. I would be wary of using icons on their own - all but a handful of icons can easily be misinterpreted without labels, and can have different meaning in different cultures. Here are some things that may affect the final outcome: Do you want to drive more people to buy online ...


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