76

Ending a price in .99 is based on the theory that, because we read from left to right, the first digit of the price resonates with us the most. That's why someone is more likely to buy a product for $2.99 than the same one for $3. The item that starts with a 2 just seems like a better deal than the one that starts with 3. Source: Why Do Most Prices End in ...


22

tl;dr Taking your example: We (the fast food chain) found that customers don't want to spend $3 on our hamburger. Customers are willing to pay somewhere in the $2 range. Our customers focus on dollars not cents. So, anything less than $2.99 is throwing cents away. The board gets mad when we throw money away. Pricing is complex, Humans are lazy ...


17

The main reason to end a price for product in .9 or .99 is human psychology. Research has proved that "Consumers perceive such prices lower than they actually are. So that additional 1 pence seems much more valuable to a consumer than it actually is." Consumers tend to "round down" that value to the nearest dollar. E.g., $9.99 would be rounded down to $9 ...


6

Slider has more cognitive load for a user. Also interaction implementation using slider could lead to some time losses. In a scenario when user keep in mind the intended price range for a product, possible issues are: User should constantly map the intended number and slider position. Even if the intended number is displayed in the slider, some users ...


6

2 arguments in favor of sliders: If I'm shopping for foo, I'm usually operating with an upper price boundary but not a lower one. Not always, but usually. A slider lets me keep my lower limit at $0 while I tweak my upper limit. Links to set price ranges force me to chunk out my search for the perfect foo (click link > scroll through lowest price range > ...


5

Sliders give free choice of the price range. Problems with Sliders However, since they are usually one of multiple criteria, and the majority of the screen should present results rather than the filter, they are usually quite small. Picking a specific price requires pixel-perfect positioning (or - in case of a hard limit - isn't even achievable). Range ...


4

I recommend something similar to Amazon : You can use something like this : download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

The case you mention (using minimum as some sort of additional filter for taxonomies) is correct, and a very important reason. Well designed faceted search systems will use this additional information to gather user's input and "guess" more likely results. But it's not the only reason. Informed users who already know the value of the product will play with ...


2

Definitely put in an increasing Y axis, so that the lower prices are at the bottom. User's aren't THAT unintelligent that they won't quickly figure out what they're seeing, when looking for something that's cheap it's logical to look for the lowest points on a graph. By reversing the axis and placing the lower values "higher" up you'll create a lot of ...


2

There are a few use cases: I want shoes for a wedding, it's a special occasion so I'm looking for something really nice but I've left it a bit late. I still want to pay as little as possible, but I want to filter out anything that's going to arrive and turn out to be poorly made. I'm looking for a place to live, I'd like three bedrooms, but I'd consider two,...


2

You can also look at running a conjoint analysis to understand what combination of factors and what price are the sweet spot. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjoint_analysis It is similar conceptually to MVT testing but done as a prior research piece rather than live optimisation.


2

Survey your target audience Design a short survey where you will show and describe your product and ask users how much they are willing to pay for it and why. You can use Surveymonkey or Amazon mechanical turk to find respondents. Do it with your target audience and try to divide the responses on groups. For example, low/high income group, young/old, etc. ...


2

It's normally best to look at what others within your industry are charging for similar products. Going too low can be seen negatively by both consumers as the product can look cheap and by other competitors as a way of devaluing the market. Going too high can cause the opposite effect of going too low! What I would suggest is take that on board and come ...


2

I've read something on the internet and one day I stumbled upon this: Pricing Guide: How to price your products IMO, this article explains very well a lot of basic things and it's easy enough to understand. I recommend this if you want a general idea of how setting a price tag works. I'm not qualified in this so I can only share my experience with you....


2

http://www.seci.info/stat/stat2_3.pdf gives a nice depiction. When doing rate comparison, people want to know how their rate compares with others. The mean doesn't provide comparative information because it's extremely influenced by outliers. Example: if 9 people make $10K p.a., and one makes $110K, the mean is $200K/10 = $20K. Which most people ...


2

The design looks clear. Some ideas: As in the Glassdoor example, you could use an empty rectangle and fill it with your value (green color). This also encourages the message that there is empty space which is money the client is saving. Use only one color to bring focus: your color, green. Horizontal diagram: either display common values over the line and ...


2

No science in this answer, just personal insight. As a consumer I'm expecting the prices to fall in order on a scale (either up or down) not being in numerical order is weird and caused me confusion when reading (vs focusing on my commitment to make a purchase) I'm guessing that selling in advance is better for the organizers as it helps with their mental ...


1

Using pills may not be the optimum interaction: - '+more' hides the range of options by default, making the user have to click more - making the user select individual 'pills' is slow going if they have a wide budget range - showing 'pills' that are unavailable may lead to 0 results, yet missing pills out of the scale may confuse the user :( It might be ...


1

N/A or Don't Care or Any or All I find it very helpful to include some sort of "any" option. Otherwise I might think I must pick something. Some possibilities include: N/A = Not/Applicable Don't Care Any All Which one works best may vary depending on the type of item being selected (price, brand, size, etc.) or the target audience. Make It Clear ...


1

If clicking on the center number in the price field(and on the due field as well) allows the user to type in the number manually, then you're good. You could also consider the vertical wheel view/picker as I have come across it more often than the horizontal one.


1

Contrary to what appears to almost universally believed, the original reason for this practice was to prevent fraud. It was to keep the customer at the counter until the transaction was completed, in the days when the sales docket and the money tendered were whisked overhead in a basket to a cashier. By making sure there would always be change to give back ...


1

Option 2 since in that instance the value is clearly mapped to the handle. And I don't think you need to worry about the value being covered by the finger or thumb. In the scenario of setting the range the interaction is totally focused to this task, which means that you can let the value take up quite a generous bit of space, meaning it can be displayed ...


1

If you want to go with the sliders shown in your question, I will suggest you go with Option 2 Additionally, I guess this will work perfectly on mobiles as the track sliders would be a little difficult for precision with fingers. This page has some more options and the code too http://www.jqueryrain.com/?ot4e1H_o


1

If this is an application for a wide range of customers I would definitely choose a verbose approach and a radio buttons group control. It gives you both fast accessibility, clear delimitations and a good view of the overall options. Hope it helps you.


1

It depends on the number of steps you have, target domain of the application and familiarity of the users to use such sliders. If there are many levels of segregation you allow, then putting that in a drop down would be cumbersome for the user to use it. On the other hand, if you have very few steps then sliders would not really slide per say. They would ...


1

It sounds like you're displaying basic ticket prices that will have other charges added before the user pays. If that's the case, then the note could say something like "The prices shown here do not include additional fees." Or "The price you pay will include additional fees." Use a simple sentence structure with clear, unambiguous words. Users might or ...


1

I like your ordering: Advanced first, then concession and door. Most users are coming to the site to buy advanced tickets, so make that option primary, by listing it first, making it larger, and styling it to look primary. The other prices need to be there, but can be formatted to be less salient. (I have no research to cite, but one of the basic principles ...


1

If you really want to be clear about the price and at the same time keep the design clean, you may try the following design. You can put all the item type as a button on the main menu, and then showing the size or different parameters with price tags in the second step. Hope it helps.


1

If you change the measure to being "Best Value" (i.e. price-per-item) then this would not only provide a graph with the "optimistic" shape, but could also be a better cognitive match with what your user is actually looking for. However if all the inverted measures you can come up with are "unnatural" (have significant cognitive dissonance) then you will ...


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