65

People read from left to right and from top to bottom. Chat applications normally place texts from top to bottom. The newest chats placed at the bottom. Placing the input at the bottom, therefore, is logical. Edit With this answer I didn't mean ALL people. For example, Arabic is read from right to left. But considering this websites' audience and the OPs ...


65

</textarea> placeholder="Enter your next post here!"> <textarea name="postText" rows="3" </div> top. to put the input at the it would make sense from bottom to top, read a chat window In a world where we <div class="post">


46

I think Steam just haven't noticed this problem. Here are some reasons to put the logout button at the bottom of the dropdown: Avoid Accidental logouts - as you pointed out putting the logout at the top of the list could create accidental logouts for users that are used to double clicking on elements. Follow standards - when browsing the internet users ...


31

Jakob Nielsen’s F-Shaped Pattern For Reading Web Content references an important tendency of users when reading websites: Users first read in a horizontal movement, usually across the upper part of the content area. This initial element forms the F's top bar. You want your user to see the notification, so the top area of the page within that top bar of ...


22

To create connection between image and description use the proximity principle from the set of Gestalt principles, giving less space to connect the elements and more space between chunks of information to separate. This gives good results both for above or below description placement. To support information consumption flow, exploiting human's percertion, I'...


21

We might want to distinct between several types of messages that got confused here: feedback messages in response to user actions, e.g. "form saved" unprovoked events, e.g. "new e-mail", "license expired", etc. system status, e.g. "idle", "processing", "process complete", etc. Each of these have ...


20

Simple answer: When you want that information/functionality to be visible/accessible at all times and the page has a long scrolling content. Screen space is a resource to be used wisely. One, because usually you have more information than can fit in one screen, and, two, everything that is on the screen imposes a cognitive load on the user. So you just have ...


19

There are actually quite a few other benefits to this approach, I'll just rattle off a few. Ergonomics. An often overlooked part of UI design, because we think of digital as not being (as) limited by the human body. But what's more comfortable, looking straight forward, or looking to either the left or the right? On phones, the middle of the screen is also ...


17

Make it harder to find destructive buttons If you do need to include destructive buttons, you should definitely find a way to make them harder to find than the primary action button Best practices for buttons It's very important for businesses today to keep the users engaged with their products, and no one wants to give them an easy access to the ...


16

I quite like the approach that the game Wordament takes: You are able to see the top results, as well as those near your ranking. I would prefer if it could ensure your score was on-screen initially though, probably by reducing the number of players before the "split" and even just above your own score.


15

The top of panels is usually reserved for controls over the panel itself, not the content of the panel. For instance, in your example you have the Full Screen icon in the top-right, which at a glance is strikingly similar to the close 'X' icon that would dismiss the panel altogether. Also, out of context it's hard to tell whether it'd work. As a single ...


13

I would show a shaded / coloured bar with the user above the first place person in the list, and then show the standard list with them in whatever position they are in. It's what StackExchange did for the Winter Bash special, and it worked really well. I happen to be at the top, so you see me twice, but I would be at the top even if I were in Benny's ...


13

User Flow Think about each menu item as a task. You can perform tasks sequentially, like task1, task2, task3.... taskN . Which would be the very last task you can perform? Answer is easy: logout. App Ergonomics By adding the logout link at the bottom of the menu, you make it harder to accidentally click that element. See graphic below: Once you open the ...


10

Proximity principle should be the first consideration. After that, it could also depend on the medium of usage. Blogs, newspapers and books for example almost always have the title below the image. This probably has to do with the fact that the images are meant to provide supporting material to the overall content of the piece. So you might read through a ...


10

To my knowledge it was not a design issue but a technical one in win 95. The taskbar should be at the top, but many of the win 3.1 app use absolute positioning on screen. And the top left 0,0 used to be in application "space" in win 3.1. There was too many issues with a taskbar at the top. It was decided to put it at the bottom to lower bugs. Nowadays every ...


9

I don't see it as more than logical. If the text is displayed in the main window from top to bottom, then the input box for your reply is on the bottom, because that's where your text will end up. While in another situation, like a comment thread on a blog, the most recent entry can be on top. Then the input field for new entries is above that, again, ...


9

As far as the buttons are concerned, I would suggest something like the attachment. I am not aware of the complete scenario though.


8

Keeping it as far away from where applications have their menu makes a clear distinction to the user that each is for controlling something very different. Applications are controlled by menus at the top, the system is controlled by menus at the bottom. Mac has also experimented with this dual concept. For instance the application dock is at the bottom, ...


8

There is nothing wrong with putting the logo in the center. You're not going to implode anything. What you're fighting though is what is called the "f-shaped pattern". Nielson did a study in 2006 (which I believe you found, based on your comments above) that showed people tend to scan a page from left-to-right, top-to-bottom in a "f shape"...


7

Reconsider the whole paradigm. No matter where you place those arrows, they will not offer a user friendly experience. First, placed outside the box, they are out of context... only slightly but still. Second. The click to move is not nearly as effective as a drag on the camera image to move it. I suggest you make the image draggable to set adjustment. This ...


7

Instead of asking "why shouldn't I?", ask "why should I?". Currently the de-facto standard is to put the timeline at the bottom. Changing this will cause mental friction, so you've got to have a good reason not to follow standards. If you have a good enough reason, then yes, maybe, maybe, move it up. But consider alternative solutions first. Why do you ...


6

Both options have some troubles: Users can't see button at top at first time, because it so little and invisible. If your filter grow in height, users can not see search button, if it located at bottom. The best way - run AJAX search after change one of filter inputs. But it be more complicated that your two options. Also, users can accidentally click to "...


6

You could try a User Centric approach where the logged-in user sees his position right in the middle of the page, surrounded by the 10 people on top and 10 under him/her. click, or ideally scroll to see full list starting at the top.


6

When multiple messages are ordered in order of writing, it is natural to put the latest one at the bottom. This mimics how physical writing works - imagine a long paper sheet or a guestbook where people come by from time to time and leave a note. Everyone would write their note just under the last note, and it would end up automatically ordered from oldest ...


6

In physical world we have caliper, which is a great example of Selection and Measure tool. You can use close approach, and it seems it solves your problem. Time indication increases usability, and the large controls are good as touch targets. While swiping, you need to display the numbers over the control to make these visible. . UPDATE As Jonas Dralle ...


6

It is an extremely interesting question, and the problem has several dimensions. Understanding the refinement Tis is the main problem I see here. The "Results Radius" does not convey any meaning that would be exact. Is it accuracy refinement? Or maybe it is narrowing the results to the ones that are close to my location? Or something completely else? So, ...


6

To my understanding, the log out button is the button in the dropdown that has a different action than the rest. The rest of your menu account details, preferences, view profile etc are navigation elements for the user, but the log out button is an action that would make the user log out from the system. What is sure is that the Log out and the ...


6

First of all Why are login forms always centered on the screen? They aren't. Some famous examples include Facebook, Stack Overflow, Office 365 (with the recent design change, they have centered their login form), Rediffmail, Yahoo (remember Yahoo!) Symmetry Symmetry is a phenomenon that is noticed throughout the universe. This makes the page look ...


5

The reason is not related to any language but the nature of the information and the focusing point for getting a general overview of changing any situation. Conversation is not a static information like the text in book. Placing text on the bottom will let user to get the latest message and ongoing conversation. The computer console is also working with ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible