55

Depends why I was on that page. Stack Exchange sites have that warning, which I appreciate because I may have a half-typed answer left in a tab when I try to close the browser. If it's just begging/bribing me to stay, then I think it would annoy.


31

Forcing the user to do anything creates a User Experience that can feel desperate and low rent. There are many sites that will use any trick available to hook the customer - the question is do you want to work on a site like that? It's a moral issue more than a UX one.


14

Subscription popups that appear when a page is loaded are easily annoying, but may not necessarily affect bounce rates negatively. However, the most important factor to consider when working with any kind of forced functionality is that it will come loaded with negative connotations. Users tend to criticize advertisements not because of their very existence,...


11

It may sound strange but was once led by this type of intrusive message. I was searching for online data host service, and after looking at the suggested plans I clicked the back button. The message appeared giving me a better suggestion for a plan, and it happened that I took it. The lesson learned here is to recognize the user intention. For example, you ...


8

Let's try bringing this back to basic emotions: It's a reasonably safe statement to say people don't like being blocked from doing something. It doesn't matter whether you're on a website or in a physical store. When you want to leave and something gets in your way, then the action of being blocked has a negative effect. I had a thought that there may be a ...


8

I would tackle the problem the other way round: Don't make the users want to leave in the first place. When users visit a webpage, they have a goal. Some look for information. Some want to buy products. Some want to compare prices. Some look for a possibility to contact the company, etc. Showing an Alert with a discount offer when the user wants to leave ...


6

I've noticed on Twitter's web site that if I write text into the new tweet composition field and then close the window/tab without posting the tweet, the field is re-populated with that text automatically if I go back to Twitter. I think this is far better UX than annoying or scaring the user with an alert, and given a fairly straightforward form, would be ...


5

Use an input field which triggers the numeric keyboard. Users will be familiar to this as it is a UI that is native to their device. <input type="number"> When using this method don't forget that the chrome desktop browser will display a spinner control. The spinner can be hidden using a bit of css: input::-webkit-outer-spin-button, input::-webkit-...


4

The only acceptable reason to block navigation is to protect the user from losing data. Forms that are half filled, files half uploaded, posts half written - in those cases this is actually helpful, as it protects the user if they accidentally close the browser or tab. However using it to try to prevent the customer from leaving? Not only is this bad UX, ...


4

So long as you are confident you abide by any relevant laws and consumer rights then you can design the PoS how you like, but having designed a UI for large PoS systems, I know it's a real nightmare area for legal requirements. Under some (probably many) laws, the consumer must be able to see clear details of the price being charged for each item, along ...


4

Better way for distinguishing would be using different set of image/icon to represent whether user is using desktop or handheld device. Similar to facebook app which shows whether user is login from desktop/web or phone device.


3

The messages instruct the user and gives them feedback that the machine is working. Sure, a processing message would show what is actually happening, but the user already assumes that. They need to know that they need to wait. They need to know that they shouldn't remove the card. The messages are instructions for the user during the processing. They also ...


3

Perhaps take a step back and see if the application can fit its environment better. As I interpret him, Alan Cooper prescribes that the user should never have to hit Save (or Cancel); applications should update continuously, defer validity checking to the last possible minute, and have excellent auditing and rollback. Assume the that normal case is that ...


3

I'm quite surprised no one has suggested Stationary Vs Mobile. Stationary Not moving or not intended to be moved http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/stationary


3

If your use case is POS, what terms apply to that context? In my past the terms were cash wrap and on the floor. You could also use 'counter' vs 'mobile'. It gets tricky when you may have one device (a tablet) that can be docked at the cash wrap or carried around the store.


2

It would be hard to convince me that you would ever want to display the price as the "option" when choosing shipping, the primary reason being that the "description" of the shipping option is always (in my experience), the unique identifier for the type of shipping that you are requesting. If you consider the most common traits for shipping options, there ...


2

It's not true that amounts are entered right to left, rather what the cashier is typing is the value of the item in cents. If the cashier wants to enter the item price $12.50, they type 1, 2, 5, 0, from left to right. The advantage of entering prices in cents is that the cashier would not have to type the decimal dots. What you are really seeing is simply ...


2

I feel like the solution is too simple and obvious, sine we're really not doing anything new. There are plenty of similar actions people perform daily without the process causing much stress or anguish. Every day I use a chip card to enter into my building and don't spend an extra moment thinking about it. I then insert my credit card into a machine to get ...


1

My suggestion would be to place the button underneath the list of variants and add the variants downwards. For indication i placed a small label on the new variant to make it easy to differentiate but keep the list scan-able. I also placed a "delete"-icon on the variant because the user might want to remove an variant, you could also add an "edit" or "move"-...


1

An observation is that this pattern leans on the side of least impact on consumer. Let's say as a user I want to donate to someone $0.50 . There would a big problem if the input defaulted to $50.00 as it expected me to put in a decimal. Now most likely this would not happen often but it would make a headache if even 1% of your users ran into this issue. ...


1

Consideration must be given to the distracting purchase environment, the hard-to-find card entry slot, and the length of time the card must remain in the machine, the last two factors being very different from the user experience of the previous swipe method. I think "Insert" ("Stop") and "Remove" states could be made more visible by adding bright supporting ...


1

If there is enough space, I would present them the options with all the details visible. Another otion is to predent them in a dropdown. Both suggestions below:


1

Commonly, what primes over price is what you're paying for. On that note, I would recommend explaining the type of service you can get and make the price secondary, i.e. "Receive it tomorrow (+$12)"


1

Your question is looking for "research or published articles about this subject" A very noble goal, you have several answers here offer opinions and nothing concrete. You say you looked and did not find anything, given the subject it is difficult to imagine how any reliable data could be collected. There would only be two possible sources. User completed ...


1

I have not faced this situation or worked in such a system, but thinking about it, this can be looked at it two ways: a. Is this the right way to incentivise ? b. How does one monitor/manage The first really calls for design thinking to be applied to understand customers and employess' natuaral motivation and then build process that align with that. For ...


1

Although I haven't designed such a system, I have a few ideas about how you could make it work. The major issue is that the cashier has been given too much authority. He is not only generating the lead, but is also 'marking' it as genuine. A good solution to this would be to make the application a two part process. The cashier generates the lead and enters ...


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