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Sounds like you want to be able to spin it one way until it stops in the off position so you don't have to look. I'm not sure how the dial is constructed and your DIY abilities but I'd try something like this. Add a stud (screw or dowel for example) to the side of the dial sticking outward. Then add another pin into the backing plate of the dial so it points ...


2

I think it is to protect the ensure the motor starts, because if low is first, low end motors might not be able to start.


2

Basically it's a much smaller surface area to grip, and many shoes don't follow the surface well. The actual material is often reasonably grippy. It can even be grippier than the surrounding area, at least if not too worn. But moulded concrete (as some of them are) can also be less grippy than asphalt. Combined with the loss of contact area this can may a ...


1

a lot of great answers here. From my experience in drive thru queues for fast food, i believe it boils down to the following Multiple queues looks shorter than it's combined length a long queue can be demotivating to someone who wants to join the the queue. It would give an impression of a longer waiting time. This solution would counter that effect. ...


1

I have various devices where the screw is an ADDITIONAL securing method. In an all adult household you then just leave the screw out.


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The screw you propose (or drop of glue, or adhesive googly-eye) secured to the OFF position should help you memorize it by touch pretty quick, once you're no longer relying on your sight to inform you. I think the issue is the mental model associated with turning this knob. Do not think of it as a water valve (where counter-clockwise means more), but instead ...


1

I would fix it with a thick semi-circle transparent vinyl adhesive. The edge of the sticker indicates which way to move the dial: Edit after the comment: If you put the sticker just on the off state, you are at the same situation as in your question with the screw. The half circle shows: Relief in the center (relief off to the left/relief on to the right) =...


1

These changes were made by the DOT to facilitate traffic flow and improve vehicle safety in and around toll plazas. Background Green, amber, and red lights are part of standardized system to communicate right of way to drivers via traffic control signals, i.e., stoplights or traffic lights. Toll plazas like those mentioned in Pennsylvania have been ...


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