60

Order of data transformation As explained in Sorting a Paginated Record Set User Experience Expectation, and as illustrated there by the following order of data transformations: You can see that both filtering and sorting come before pagination. This means that whenever the order changes (sort), you should repaginate. Back to page one? Whether or not ...


54

Emails were never intended as a form of chat type messaging. Remember that they are electronic versions of mail, so trying to modify them to be something they weren't designed for is a mistake. As to the reasons why we write the subject line first: The subject line is part of the header of an email (see the original RFC822 and the newer RFC5322), and ...


45

For readers: You need to know what the stuff is all about. For writer: You need to know what the stuff you are going to write about.


18

Ω (Alt 234) will push an item to the bottom in windows file folders; I like it because it's intuitive.


14

Keeping the page number after changing the order makes no sense. The page number is the same but the page isn't, let alone that going back or forth between pages lost the idea of coordination. What use would that have for the user? If you test this on real users you can expect them to be confused by this. They probably expect to see the first result on page ...


13

Though the number of steps you defined looks fine to me, This is going to be really hard question to answer unless you show screenshots of the pages in question since there are single page checkouts as well which handle the information density well and guide the user well. But to answer your question, there is no right or wrong number of checkout steps as ...


12

Add a drop shadow to the element so it appears pinned to the finger. Left: Material Design Components > Lists > Behavior Right: Apple Human Interface Guidelines > iOS > User Interaction > Drag and Drop Apple's HIG specifically mentions the ‘rising’ action: Touching and holding selected content makes it appear to rise and adhere to the user's finger.


11

Came across this post today and wanted to provide a response based on some developments in the past couple of years (since 2012). Google offers a good solution signaling its Gmail users of sortable elements by using two rows of stacked dots on hover (desktop)


10

We are facing a similar situation where our client has a huge catalog and wants to allow its users to successively filter down the content by drilling down into a hierarchy defined by them; a hierarchy they can decide to change anytime and as much as they want. Add to that the fact that the target platform is Android, its omnipresent back button and ...


10

This may be similar to the question Why don't ATMs give you cash before your card?: Users follow the tasks in sequence, but regard the task as completed once they have achieved their goal. Subsidiary steps are easy to abandon at this point. The goal of writing an email is conveying information. Once the message body is complete that goal is supposedly ...


9

I personally feel like if you try to think of your application as a real life human being, then it helps design all the interactions with a user in a more meaningful way. So in this example, the user wants to ask your app a question/enquiry. Now if your app was a human being, how would that play out? User: Hello, I have a question. Do you have the Planet ...


9

Users typically want to see the most recent activity first. Think tweets, online banking transactions, news updates. It makes it easy to see what's new since you last checked. With conversations, it's different because there is the context of whatever message came before and after the one you're looking at. It's a similar situation to what you see in ...


9

I'd like to approach this question from a bit of a different perspective than that of other answers. What's In An Order The essential question posed is questioning the philosophy and methodology of ordering form fields. On the one hand, one might wish to order them in the order that the author would be expected to write them. This is a perfectly sensible ...


8

The session is stored on the server whereas the cookies is stored on the user desktop. In the session, you have no way to retrieve the cart's information after the session is expired (generally 30 minutes at most). You will throw away 2 hours of Paula's time, who has struggled to choose that red shirt over the green one. Cookies's size and number are ...


7

Is the equity of choice a good thing for the user? If the user could benefit from better load balancing due to shorter queue times, longer assistance or better resources, why not expose that fact to the users and let them choose less busy staff for their own sake? If the equity isn't useful for the user, try exposing more points of difference in the list so ...


7

Personally I'd go with option B on iOS, and would look what do Androids show. On desktop, I'd use some kind of "bumping", it's important, you can see why here in this answer: https://ux.stackexchange.com/a/25032/16685


7

Based on code page 437, here is a list of characters that come after z. Note they are listed in sort order. Omega is probably the most appropriate for this use case, because it is the last letter of the Greek alphabet. α alpha U+03B1 Alt 224 Γ gamma U+0393 Alt 226 δ delta U+03B4 Alt 235 ε epsilon U+03B5 Alt 238 Θ theta ...


7

Consider adding textual instruction and a visual indicator to the side of the table showing the time-based ordering of entries. I would also allow users to re-order entries within the table. Something like this: I think this approach ends up being the most effective if you must stick with your stated constraints (no date entry, low impact to screen real ...


6

NN/g article explaining different sorting which should be used depending on the scenario. Alphabetical Sorting Must (Mostly) Die Widths and heights are ordinal data, meaning that they have an inherent monotonically increasing sequence. Such items should almost always be sorted accordingly. Other times, items have domain-related logical groupings. You can ...


6

As a reader, I want to know "Why are you sending me this email?" so I know whether it is worth my while reading it now, instead of doing all those other important things on my to-do list. As a reader, I expect the writer to know why they are sending me the email, and more to the point, I hope they will know why they are sending me the email before they ...


6

Just label it Sometimes the best solution is the most obvious one. You can come up with all sorts of clever UI tricks to reinforce the sort order, but you're better off just spelling it out. Without thinking about it in great detail, I see two ways to make it obvious. Sort control If possible, allow the user to sort the list according to a handful of ...


5

And if it has maximum of 30 items and all of them are visible why you just not place an action at the end of the list and add an ability to quickly reorder the list? So, position of the new item will be obvious. And you can keep the selection untouched in this case.


5

I would go with option E - most people read from left to right. They examine things from the left and then slowly move to the right, if you have played games in the heydays of 8-bit you would see that most games have you start on the left and moving towards the right. So it is easier to notice you could drag the items if the icon is on the left. However, I ...


5

Yes tags can be hierarchical and there is actually a lot of (not yet widely recognised) potential in it. Although some people (probably like the question asker) have been curious and/or after hierarchical tagging for years, the reason it is not present on the CMS market now is more because of technical obstacles rather than not seeing point in it. With pure ...


5

Users sometimes want to move things up, sometimes move things down; so you should offer both. Asking users to calculate an alternative way to achieve their task reduces usability. Consider the following daily task list: Tidy room. Buy a book on Amazon. Reply to John's email. A person might go: I can't be asked cleaning my room, this is the least of my ...


5

Note that there are cases when it makes sense to not reset to the page one—when there's a notion of the ‘current selected’ or focused item in the list. Examples are mostly desktop apps with emphasis on immediate user interaction in the list itself with the help of the concept of ‘focus,’ instead of jumping between views like in web apps: a file manager that ...


4

You could balance the workload by assigning points to the translators but hiding those from the user. Let's say we have 5 translators: Alfred, Bianca, Carlos, Dave, and Eliza. Assuming lazy users we'd expect Alfred to shoulder most of the workload, especially in a very long alphabetized list. Instead, let's say that every time a translator completes a ...


4

In my opinion tag hierarchy is not always a bad idea, but I think hierarchy is a bad word here, I would consider this being subsets. Let's say we are on Stack Overflow and because you work often with Microsoft Excel, you are interested in all questions regarding it. So you add as favorite the "excel" tag and ignore all the others. But there are other tags ...


4

It's already done (and proofed) by many others. Messages goes from newest to oldest and comments goes from oldest to newest. That's familiar, that's how e-mails (messages and replies), messages at facebook, etc are done. You may use different views (chained messages, which will be organized into threads), or sorted by date (without any linking) like it's ...


4

There are two main eye patterns for web design. The first: F-Shaped Reading Pattern The second: ZigZag/Triangle Reading Pattern Deisngs that fit into one of these two will work well with user. However if you are looking to get even more creative you can try out using the Golden Ratio to design a webpage, specifically placing content in the golden spiral ...


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