Hot answers tagged

106

The first thing is to ask if this absolutely necessary within your system? If you don't need to ask for a gender then don't. Modern understanding of what gender means is incredibly complicated (there are at least 6 options I can think of) and can also be incredibly personal. If you really do need to ask (although I can't envision anything outside ...


93

I recommend matching the order in which your options are presented in the list. You decided to put them in alphabetically (or so it seems), and I see no reason to change the order in the question.


79

For user-friendliness, the choices should be listed in the same order they are presented in the question. If you ask "Are you male or female?" then A should be male and B should be female. I would present male first; as that is the norm, it won't throw the user off.


76

tl;dr: No matter what you do, you will be in good company. Purely as far as order goes male-first seems to be the traditional preference and seems to match linguistic expectations of most users. Despite this modern western tech companies seem to opt for female-first. Cultural connotations A lot of the answers dive into western liberal notions about ...


57

Before proceeding further, I would recommend reading the guidance on collecting data on sex and gender (PDF) to ensure you act both legally and ethically. Depending on the laws in your country, you may not be able to collect the data if it's not relevant. Not only does the guidance suggest people rethink the binary options, but also: Members must ensure ...


54

Emails were never intended as a form of chat type messaging. Remember that they are electronic versions of mail, so trying to modify them to be something they weren't designed for is a mistake. As to the reasons why we write the subject line first: The subject line is part of the header of an email (see the original RFC822 and the newer RFC5322), and ...


45

For readers: You need to know what the stuff is all about. For writer: You need to know what the stuff you are going to write about.


36

Randall Munroe from the xkcd blog has a different approach: Do you have a Y chromosome? Don’t Know/Yes/No. If unsure, select “Yes” if you are physically male and “No” if you are physically female. If you have had SRS, please respond for your sex at birth. This question is relevant to the genetics of colorblindness The reason is to avoid a question ...


35

Definately keep the order of the buttons the same on all parts. There is nothing more disturbing than clicking a delete button where on the previous page there was a edit button. As for the order, I would suggest ordering them by what you want users to click most often. Use UI design to guide the application user.


24

I think it'd make the most sense to order it by the most likely expected response. Similar to putting "United States" first in a list of countries on an primarily USA-based app, there's nothing wrong with ordering it for ease of use for your particular audience, especially if you target a particular gender demographic. As a transgender person myself, ...


18

I assume you want to avoid the word "sex" and limiting gender to only two options may seem offensive to some. Nevertheless, coming back to your original question, I'd opt for the fist choice, "Are you male or female?". The justification is that in many languages one achieves a sort of pleasant words flow when placing a shorter component before the longer ...


17

I made a demo solution with CSS3. The Salary column is in ascending sorted status and the Bonus column is in descending one. I commit the work to github at horiontal-tight-table-sorter-css3. You can have a quick review of the html page here htmlpreview horiontal-tight-table-sorter-css3. For the sake of the demo, I only tested it on Chrome. Hope this help....


16

I agree with SavTheCoder but it depends on your page structure. If it's a list, the Stack Exchange system is very efficient But if it is a grid page you should do something like this. Don't forget you can give more importance to the upvote or downvote button according to what you expect people do. If you want to encourage a positive feeling about the ...


14

It is best to order them logically and group similar actions together. In your case with only three, the order that you have them now is good. However one thing that you really should do it to move the delete button away so that it is not with other action buttons. I would place it aligned to the right to reduce the likelihood that it is accidentally ...


12

Take a look at this article https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-science-behind-behavior/201609/how-should-market-researchers-ask-about-gender-in-surveys since it has interesting information about asking gender on a survey, even for cases when the user is transgender. Here's a paragraph that sums up everything and the best approach (according to the ...


11

Which one is primary for you up or down? Up on the right makes up primary, and gives it finality, as opposed to putting it on the left. But it depends on your layout. This assuming that your buttons are on the bottom of your content. But why make such distinctions? When you can make up up and down down like so:


11

To answer the direct question, I prefer "male" before "female" as a user. tl;dr reasons: It's more euphonic. It's conventional. Efficiency is not sacrificed for either user case. As I am reading through the form, it is much more euphonic to read "male" prior to "female." Go ahead and say them each out loud. "Male-fe-male." Now say "Fe-male-male." The ...


10

I think this is the logical order. Create | Edit | Delete And definitely keep the same throughout the application.


10

This may be similar to the question Why don't ATMs give you cash before your card?: Users follow the tasks in sequence, but regard the task as completed once they have achieved their goal. Subsidiary steps are easy to abandon at this point. The goal of writing an email is conveying information. Once the message body is complete that goal is supposedly ...


10

Forward chronological order lends itself well to finite amount of data that tells a story. Reverse chronological order lends itself well to (potentially) infinite amount of data that loses usefulness over time. For example, in Facebook, each post is listed in reverse chronological order, so you scroll back through history, but within each post the comments ...


9

I'd like to approach this question from a bit of a different perspective than that of other answers. What's In An Order The essential question posed is questioning the philosophy and methodology of ordering form fields. On the one hand, one might wish to order them in the order that the author would be expected to write them. This is a perfectly sensible ...


9

Trying to find a more complicated solution that feels natural is a recipe for failure. Keep it simple. Even if it isn't 100% perfect for all cases, as long as it's clear, you get most of the benefit. News feeds should use a top posting as the newest feed is the most important. This can also apply to commenting if the newest comments are more important. ...


9

As the other users already said: the most sites are using first the upvote (or like) button, and then the downvote. Also when you say it. You say first upvote and then downvote. With the voting system on Stackoverflow, you recognize firstly the upvote button, then the downvote. Reanud's point with the forcing of the button is great. It is also good if you ...


7

Make the page choose a random number in JavaScript. If it's even, display the female choice first; if it's odd, display the male choice first. Also, the query text should be in the same order as the choices. After those two choices, you should have an "other" choice. This way, nobody can accuse you of bias for putting one choice before the other! Half the ...


7

You should not worry about placing them in any particular order. Just toss a coin and place them randomly (at design time; doing so per each page reload makes little sense). Why? Because being obsessed so much with the (very immature) idea of "listed first == respected most" just helps the world to continue becoming a worse place to live in and stimulates ...


6

Considder if you can't change your design a bit further than by just changing the ordering of your buttons. Ask yourself if the buttons really make sense in the first place. You currently have two types of buttons above your list: one button that creates a new item in the list, and two buttons that act on the currently selected item. The item has to be ...


6

As a reader, I want to know "Why are you sending me this email?" so I know whether it is worth my while reading it now, instead of doing all those other important things on my to-do list. As a reader, I expect the writer to know why they are sending me the email, and more to the point, I hope they will know why they are sending me the email before they ...


6

In general, when designing menus, you should optimize for speed. A well-designed menu reduces the time a user needs to find a particular menu item. A couple of helpful strategies, in descending order of preference: Put frequently used options at the front. E.g., 'Open' in your case seems a logical option to put on top. Group related items. Both 'new' menu ...


5

Try something like this. Keep the horizontal positioning of the column labels the same and add sorting horizontally on top but in smaller font using some noticeable color. If possible, make the whole div (or table cell) having that column label clickable and sort icons clickable.


5

Google's guidelines explicitly mention something about the order of the items in a menu: Menus with static content should have the most frequently used menu items placed at the top of the menu. Menus with dynamic content may have other behavior, such as placing previously used fonts at the top of the menu. The order can change based on user ...


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