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4

To show that only one option is possible I would group the related options:


3

Plain language requires less interpretation than icons. Just ask them. Icons alone have been shown to be open to interpretation. Your current approach has 12 icons (plus 9 arrows) spread across 3 rows. Why not just ask the question? Option 1: clickable statements Replace the icon sequences with 3 statements (like you've stated above). People don't want to ...


3

You could consider using a calendar picker in which the only selection a user can make is an entire week (as opposed to a typical calendar picker where users can select specific days). This is a pretty standard web convention for dealing with user-input dates. Depending on your use case, it could also be helpful to label the weeks with numbers, and allow ...


2

There's another option: radio buttons. Since you can only have one type for the system to work, a common control you can use are radio buttons. They are best for 2 -4 options, where the user can quickly scan which configuration they want. One aspect of this control, is that you can set the default option you think is best for most users. You can also educate ...


2

Often this pattern is used to input numbers in this case this would be an "input stepper". This would fit to this element to since the name does not imply that only numbers can be selected. So I would go with something like the following: Input stepper Option stepper


2

The concern is that the user might not understand the difference between the two options in the settings. I think the simple solution is that you can just use a more descriptive explanation for the option that is used to toggle the toggle. For example: Allow "Sport Mode" to be toggled from the main page. You could even opt to make this a simple ...


1

A bit of Googling using terms such as Horizontal Selector, Horizontal Picker, Horizontal Carousel etc. leads to the realization that this UI element is simply a... Single-element carousel Image source and Carousel Demo .. albeit with a few changes: no sliding animation, no looping, and no carousel slide marker The UI element seems to take other forms as ...


1

How I would approach this problem: Layout: Browsing a grid (1) is much harder than a list, perhaps you can break it up. Grouping: Information is much easier to understand when grouped logically. I don't know your content, but you can probably form groups. Then color code them, frame them, etc., make it subtle but obvious. Text: centred text is hard to scan. ...


1

First note, as I think you discovered in your test, is that having a box appear on hover that contains interactive things like links can get you into trouble. You have to implement a directional tracking system for cursor movement to know when to keep it or close it and on the accessibility side keyboard users don't have a way to reach it. So, if it is going ...


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