Hot answers tagged

128

Software development IDEs have some of the most complicated settings pages I've ever seen, and IntelliJ IDEA does a great job with discoverability. Not only do they offer a search to narrow down the left "tree" to matching pages, they also have a special highlighting effect for matching options. This is similar to your Chrome example, but even better since ...


65

You could use an accordion. Here's an example of one I've used before:


35

Yes - underhanded, but this is not a problem reserved for the web - it's long been an issue for print too. A couple of years ago, the EU banned pre-ticked boxes on shopping websites in order to prevent such issues as unintentional purchase of insurance or optional extras when purchasing plane tickets, for example. The legislation does appear to revolve ...


19

Root Cause: Implementation Driving UI The whole idea of a single consolidated Options dialog seems to be a consequence of programs having configuration files. The Options function would read the configuration file, present it to the user in a dialog for editing, then save the changes back the configuration file. Perhaps some other programs do the same thing,...


9

For a simple A, B, and A + B selection you shouldn't need to get too fancy and radio buttons are a good approach: They are an instantly recognized widget for 1-of-N choices. They spell out the options clearly. Users need only 1 click to select any option (vs up to 2 for checkboxes). Radio buttons and checkboxes are both small controls so the added click ...


8

The select field on your screenshot might not be the best solution for selecting the payment period. As a user I don't get a good experience in comparing the alternatives and probably I won't notice that there's an alternative to the very prominent designed orange 49.90/month offer. The problem here is that 50$ per month is a lot if the user wants to use ...


8

I posted a related question recently as I have been struggling with a similar problem. From what I have mustered there is no clear and clean cut solution, as these kinds of "options" are often very contextual. This article briefly covers and provides some well known examples. However, I still feel that there is much to be done in terms of design solutions ...


6

Is this the right feedback? Not much to go on. You may need to test and probe more about what’s really bothering users. Is it really a strictly aesthetic problem? And does this user feedback come from users simply viewing the prototype or actually using it in a task? You can get very different reactions depending on how you’re testing. For example, users ...


5

How can you Add Detail if there is displayed short version of record? User don't see which details are already entered and which could be added. So Add Detail should be inside full record view. View in your case is not necessary. And Delete could be group operation, like in email clients. So you can simplify your table by removing Actions column. View ...


5

The drag and drop and "older version" of it - using arrows: Drag and drop needs to have well solved interactions (how it behaves and looks like when dragging, how it looks like when you can and can't drop it). This is good thing to do, but only in case if you have a solid library to implement it (true on web, rarely true for desktop app frameworks). ...


5

Grouping can be improved by drawing a line between "Configuration" and "Preferences". Everything that the user has to configure to get your app running should go to "Configuration". Everything optional, which can actually be a matter of preference, should go to "Preferences". For example, I hardly have a "preference" for the default printer (it has to be the ...


5

The solution is pretty simple. When someone completes checking three checkboxes, disable all non-selected checkboxes. If someone clicks on a disabled checkbox, show an alert to the user that already 3 options are selected. However, you can make the design more intuitive by having some progress element. This is the state when the user has checked only two ...


5

The decision to use of a prev/next navigation to click through a range of colors is itself frustrating. Imagine having to click 50 times just to get to color #50, and once I'm in #50, having to click back 25 times to navigate back to #25 because I liked how it looked. Regardless how many options there are, the navigation solution is itself inefficient. ...


4

If you don't have a default, you probably shouldn't use radio buttons, or Bootstrap radio button groups. In fact, it's your choice of controller here that's creating the problem. One possible solution is simply to present the options as being visually distinct and use appropriate labeling to indicate that an answer is required and the options are mutually ...


4

Usability decreases as flexibility increases Usability vs flexibility is well known issue, particualry when it comes to enterprise software! Sometimes though, decisions in this area are not entirely designer led.. business pirorities as well as the need to remain competitive drive the demand for more configurable and flexible solutions. There is hope... ...


4

The easiest and most intuitive thing for the first time user is two checkboxes with validation to prevent turning off both. The reasoning is that the user reads down the options one by one and judges each one separately in order. They are not trying to optimize their number of clicks on first visit, they're trying to optimize their cognitive load; as they ...


4

It's because of one of the vital UX Law called as Miller's Law. George Armitage Miller (Princeton Professor and Cognitive Psychologist) formulated a law based on his observations and findings in his the theory of communication, which states that : The number of objects an average human can hold in working memory at a single glance is 7 ± 2. Which ...


4

To show that only one option is possible I would group the related options:


3

You could try the following flow. Hub page contains appropriate links which allow to set additional parameters.


3

I'm facing the same issue at the moment. This is my solution so far: 2 radio buttons horizontally. I recommend this one because you need just one tap to make a choice, and it saves vertical space. I do not recommend using a Spinner, or the solution provided by @nashmaniac, as this will increase the number of taps you need to make a choice.


3

It's bad UX to take settings away from people that need them. It's good UX to hide the complexities of software that most people have no need to deal with. I think Firefox's decision is simply a balance of that. They've (making an assumption here) come to the conclusion that most of the internet requires JavaScript to make it enjoyable and usable, so few ...


3

It seems like your original assumptions are wrong. if it is made intuitive and clear, is not a problem. If it is designed and organized well it shouldn’t be a problem to have a quazillion options as long as they are intuitive, independent and it is what users want. The problem is that many options are not intuitive nor clear. They seems intuitive and ...


3

Why not show the summary first and let the user chose from available options? Just like the domain hosting sited do? e.g.


3

All are valid, and all have their pros and cons: Check boxes and toggle switches are the simplest option, but they're only good when the question can be clearly answered with a "yes" or "no". For example: "Are you a US Citizen?" (answer is clearly yes or no) vs "Do you drive your sports car often?" (answer could be daily/weekly/monthly/rarely/not applicable,...


3

For First Layout : If it is a responsive layout, where the Change Language will shift. According to me the second layout will work good. Beause its all in center, User will concentrate only in center he do not have to search for things here and there. Even Google, Facebook have launguage change, at the bottom of the website.


3

I suggest tabs and a bit of rewording to clarify the action the user is taking. Also added a bit of instruction at the bottom. Explanation: Your wording is "Create Live Wallpaper from Video/Dynamic Photo." When they're finished that is what they've done, but the particular task at hand is to display either the available Videos or Dynamic Photos (plural) in ...


3

Well, I don’t see any buttons at all, which is a good thing, you only need one or two buttons for this. Of course, if you have buttons and they don’t even look like buttons, then you have real problems. But I assume you don’t mean buttons and it’s just a translation issue Anyways, if you’re building a form to gather user’s opinions, just keep it simple. Get ...


3

If the 90% use case is a specific option, you can label it 'recommended', and explain why if needed. Is the act of selection explicit? If you want to keep the action of choosing an option up to the customer (it sounds like your use case requires a choice), you can lead them to the most common with a simple label showing what the vast majority do. Ordering of ...


3

Plain language requires less interpretation than icons. Just ask them. Icons alone have been shown to be open to interpretation. Your current approach has 12 icons (plus 9 arrows) spread across 3 rows. Why not just ask the question? Option 1: clickable statements Replace the icon sequences with 3 statements (like you've stated above). People don't want to ...


3

You could consider using a calendar picker in which the only selection a user can make is an entire week (as opposed to a typical calendar picker where users can select specific days). This is a pretty standard web convention for dealing with user-input dates. Depending on your use case, it could also be helpful to label the weeks with numbers, and allow ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible