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It is necessary if you have different versions of the website for Desktop and Mobile. For example, a lot of websites scrap out features that might get too complicated to be operated on Mobile. For example, Facebook's Mobile version does not feature all of its settings. It is also possible that a large tablet which can process a webpage faster like a ...


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Personally, I think such an option is essential. For two reasons: Users might be accustomed to the desktop interface. For example, a user that is used to access the website through a desktop can have a really hard time finding the controls he is accustomed to in the mobile version. This is bad if the user wants to use the mobile version just once (e.g. ...


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Primary Reasons for Desktop site's necessity can be summarized in 3 bullet points: Compatibility Issues Providing Limited Working Features (while still working on full feature roll out) Redirecting for alternative Rich Experience The trend came about with the advent and early popularity stage of mobile sites ~10-12 years ago, because most mobile sites ...


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I turn my phone sideways and it has higher resolution than my desktop. When you optimize for 320x480, and a tiny device comes along with over 2500x1400, there are going to be issues. The mobile version of most sites almost invariably is the worst UX. (--Worst UX for me, personally. I mean, obviously there are people who like the mobile versions, which is ...


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No, neither is better. They deal with different aspects or strategies, and in general you need both. A small change lets you refine your design and have a better understanding of what affects conversion, but may let you end up with a local maxima. A more radical change with many elements will not help you understand what affects conversion, but may also ...


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Well sometimes the mobile version of the site lacks content that is only available in the desktop version. This is often done to save bandwith (lower quality of images or exclude some elements completely) and eliminate visual clutter. Users might want to see that content from their mobile devices, so providing an link to the desktop or full site is suggested....


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Steve Krug's opinion In Don't Make Me Think, Revisited, Chapter 10 deals with mobile usability. Steve Krugg states the following (emphasis mine): Always provide a link to the "full" Web site. No matter how fabulous and complete your mobile site is, you do need to give users the option of viewing the non-mobile version, especially if it has ...


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Typically, the top performing apps have shorter (branded) titles The average for the top 200 free apps are: 26 characters 4.5 words But it probably doesn't matter App title length – if penalized at all by Apple, is easily offset by increased downloads or other variables weighted by Apple’s app store algorithm. It is up to the publisher/marketer to ...


5

It sounds like you need multivariate testing. For example, select four elements on the page you'd like to test. You could radically redesign each of the elements so that in one version of the test, you're testing a mostly redesigned page. Then those four elements would be turned "on" or "off" alternately. You'd end up with 16 variations against your control (...


4

Your client is basically correct - your users need to be able to find what they are looking for quickly and efficiently - not only is this good UX, but in e-commerce it improves conversions and therefore profit. However, their insistence that all three menus be visible at once is misguided and perhaps even detrimental to the fundamental user goal mentioned ...


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Yes, If desktop users are shown a different version of the site. This is a usability issue. I have seen so many sites that do not display properly on small screens or that do not serve the same content. (usually 'quickmenus'/reduced to content allegedly 90% of users want, not me!)


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Why did this trend come about? For developing websites there are three major approaches toward how they are developed*: Responsive Web Design Adaptive Web Design Separate "Desktop" and "Mobile" sites Responsive Web Design (RWD) is where a site is designed in a way that it changes to fit whatever screen size it is rendered on. From a technological ...


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It was mostly used for "m.websites" (ex: m.cnn.com) which are already off trends and slowly fading away. m.website are basically the same copy of your website with a different URL. You will be feeding content to 2 websites at the same time ex: m.cnn.com and cnn.com have duplicates in content with different screen optimisation. The m.website has many ...


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Select then act Spreadsheets lend themselves to selecting the area to act upon then editing or choosing your action. In the case of tagging cells or ranges, as a user I would expect to select my range then apply the tag, not the other way around. There are likely some actions that blur the lines (eg cetain types of large area formatting), but those cases ...


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Unlike video files that usually only support a constant frame rate, there’s an individual delay between frames in the animated image file formats like AGIF, APNG‌¹, MNG or SVG+SMIL‌². This (and often the lack of sound) is a fundamental difference which simple video to GIF converters cannot take advantage of. I don’t know whether there are advanced ones that ...


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For an existing product, you have two primary modes of working on new features: 1. Optimization When optimizing an existing product to the needs of it's user base, or to extend into adjacent markets, research into real user behavior is critical. You would be hunting primarily for pain points, under-used features, and workflow gaps. You can guess based on ...


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Cinema uses 24 frames per second. HD video cameras typically capture at 30 or 60 fps. More frame rates When I used to create web banner adverts we used to use 12 fps to help reduce file size. However you will find the size of the colour palette affects the file size too. Certain image editing tools (Photoshop's Animation palette) allow you to set the ...


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It's true people hate change. It could scare them off. But there are ways of minimizing any recoil or you could even turn it to your advantage. Make small iterations A nice example is the case of Google and Yahoo. Google has changed it's logo multiple times over the years. They removed bevels and went from a serif to a sans serif font. Many people didn't ...


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As others have said, the trend originally came about because of the way full sites were ported to mobile devices. Early on, people were taking established sites and scrunching them down to work with the mobile technology and save on bandwidth. This meant changes in resolution, orientation, and browser capabilities. Features would often be removed along with ...


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Possibly not even if there's a difference between your sites. At least if your user-agent handling works properly. Example: SE on Android mobile has a "full site" link at the bottom. I only realised that when I went looking for it to post this answer. The browser's own menu option for "request dekstop site" is easier to find for two reasons: the menu is ...


1

Content display has to follow a mobile first philosophy. However, I would recommend looking at Google analytics first to understand if users who will see this content are using a mobile device. if they are, you want to make sure mobile content is not a "subset" of desktop content. Try not to remove elements on mobile. Like someone said- cards are a good ...


1

One more reason: The user might not actually be using a mobile device currently, but might just have been following a link posted by someone using the mobile site. (Of course, this only applies if your site actually has different URLs for mobile and "desktop".)


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Yes, You can use a Bluetooth keyboard with most mobile, and some smart phones allows the display to be sent to a TV or monitor. So you don't know if a smart phone is being used with a small touch screen. Also mobile versions of sites often have bugs in them..... (For example the mobile version of gmail stopped working on my smart phone for a few weeks.)...


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I think some people have over-analysed this question. The answer in my view is always 'no' and there are 2 simple reasons for this: If it's a repsonsive website then there's effectively no such thing as a 'desktop version' which negates the question. The responsive layout should work in a way where elements are rendered appropriately to the device but it's ...


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Yes it is necessary. Having Desktop site is good if the mobile site is not working in any case or if the user is unable to get the exact flow of activities. Now a days as mobile users are increasing, every site should be responsive enough which will remove this option of "Desktop site". Now if a particular site is made separately for mobile and desktop (...


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I think this is done when a site's desktop version is well established, and they are "grafting on" a very different mobile site, perhaps developed by a different team. Either because the website Is The Product and is extremely well evolved and tuned, with many internal stakeholders, and they can't afford to break stuff (think Amazon or Yahoo homepage)... ...


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I agree with @JonStory where if you have both sites, there is no reason to not offer the option of visiting the full desktop site. Especially if technologies are potentially in place that mobile cannot utilize (Java, Flash). On modern sites with Mobile-First development, there is potentially no reason to have a desktop site (ex: Bootstrap sites generally). ...


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Sorry for the late reply ... Google's Material Guidelines have documented many of the common solutions to this problem. Following are a few examples that I've had success with. Discovery is critical The notorious hamburger menu proliferated in answer to the need to cram complex navigation into a mobile view. The unsurprising side effect was obscuring ...


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I would use a Button Based UI in this case. Why? From what you've described in the use case about metadata-aware spreadsheets, I'm assuming that the most user actions would start with the question: "I need to take some action on these cells". The question you need to be answering for them is - "Which cells do you want to act on?" and then, "What do you ...


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