121

My understanding was that it came from a time when startup could take a while, during which the user's attention would be elsewhere and therefore worth notifying them when the computer was ready for use. Something similar was mentioned in answer to another question: The Operating System took so long to start up that the chime notified people that it ...


32

Part of it is iconic branding, much like putting the logo on the boot screen. I can still remember the startup sound from windows xp and playstation one.


28

To give auditory feedback to the user that the system has started loading. Here are 3 reasons why: Prevent users from hitting the power button multiple times. Users should not wonder whether the system is starting or not. If there was no starting sound how would users know that the system has successfully started? They might press the power button a ...


20

Beeps during POST are there to help with troubleshooting. Think of it like debugging: if you can't tell why your script isn't working or where, it helps to have it echoing its status along the way in a very verbose manner so it becomes apparent where the issue is. It's like a ping. POST does a lot of simple things very quickly to test itself (this is all in ...


12

Asides from old systems and their delay times at start, or branding considerations (both correct reasons), one reason that I might add is that it serves as a Sensory Cue. This is true both for blind or impaired vision users, in which startup sound is of paramount importance (this sound is the only indication they have in order to know that the system is "...


8

Use the ISO format for combined date and time values. It's best to stick to the standards, especially when dealing with dates. The above linked Wikipedia article states (emphasis mine): A single point in time can be represented by concatenating a complete date expression, the letter "T" as a delimiter, and a valid time expression. For example, &...


7

Yes, Ubuntu is fairly active in the UX field. Here are a few links for your reference: Ubuntu Design Blog Design team at Ubuntu Design Research at Ubuntu Launchpad project that tracks all user experience (UX) bugs related to Unity Next UX design jobs at Canonical Even though I have never been a part of their UX design community, I can vouch for Ubuntu ...


6

Branding. Of course there are other reasons to include it, like letting the user know the hardware is working, start up is finished and they can interact with the computer, etc. but it is an extremely powerful branding tool. It is familiar, it becomes expected, and if it's a good one, it can evoke strong feelings in us (see for instance http://gizmodo.com/...


5

Interesting question. This is what I could find after a bit of searching on the matter: This article by Chen J, Proctor RW. (2013) seems to address this question. Sadly the full article isn't publicly available, but here is their conclusion (although it is hard to know what it is actually based on): Conclusion: Scrolling in the direction of content ...


4

I think what you're describing – a desktop that is "a view into a particular folder, much like a file manager" with "some very basic minimal file manager type UI" – has been implemented by the KDE project with the Plasma Folder View (my emphasis): The Folder View widget is used to display entries like folders or files from a folder, by ...


4

Common symbols for the super key are OS-specific. From this answer elsewhere on StackExchange and Wikipedia it doesn't seem like there is an icon other than the Windows and Mac platform specific ones. If you know which OS you will use or have a preference, I would recommend one of those. An alternative could be to use the obsolete meta key symbol, which ...


3

JSON really just structures data in containers - {} or []. So the question really is what ways can you find of showing structures in a containers. I can't think of any more global container than a simple rectangle, and by using colours and some basic design elements, you can easily show a visual representation of the data. Here's a rough idea of what I ...


3

Assumption: The system has a large number of files and large number of different file types. 1. Grouping things into categories and subcategories simplifies things Imagine trying to understand all living organisms without any form of classification. No kingdoms, phylums, classes, orders, families, etc. This one simple example clearly illustrates the ...


2

It's about saying Hello Hello The start-up sound was a machine, designed and made by people, announcing its variant of "Hello", indicating it's now present, here, and in being on, is a being, here. By which I mean to say it's antiquated. A greeting of the past. Just as beeps and blips indicating errors in boot are now a thing of the past, the welcoming ...


2

Although I'm sure things are much more advanced now, my Grandfather who was blind used the POST beeps in tandem the Windows opening noises (especially once 95 released) to let him know that his speech card had not caused the system to hang. I'm not sure if it was an issue with the brand of cards he would purchase, the retailer, or just the technology wasn't ...


2

I take it this is unambiguous to a human reader rather than a machine? The ISO 8601 is a good suggestion for machine readable/parseable data, but for human readability it's trickier. E.g. the US does dates with months and days swapped round, so in your example do you mean the 5th December or the 12th May? That's bit me a few times in the past - while the ...


1

There are more things than you might suggest. Besides different OSes there are different locales in each of them, and weird stuff is going on there (different keys for different purposes, right-to-left typing, letters being combined into clusters as in Korean, no spaces to jump between the words (Japanese, Chinese) but some logical word-splitting instead). ...


1

I tend to lean toward ISO, but with file-naming limitations, the benefits of sorting, and yet still relatively human friendly, for your use case, I'd actually lean toward something like: 2020y01m14d_12h30m11s_8765ms-23hrs-UTC.log 2020y01m15d_12h31m11s_7654ms-23hrs-UTC.log 2020y01m16d_12h27m11s_9867ms-23hrs-UTC.log 2020y01m17d_12h41m11s_5432ms-23hrs-...


1

I prefer to represent all of data in 2 digits as follows, 20Y02M14D12H30M11S86SS75MS.log But if you have to keep year and millisecond in 4 digits then you might use the following one, 2020Y02M14D12H30M11S8675MS.log


1

The Hyper modifier key is defined in the Space-cadet keyboard. This type of keyboards used in the MIT Lisp machines which ran some dedicated operating systems. These OSes were written from the ground up in Lisp programming language, such as Genera.


1

I'd use the OS X Command key symbol, ⌘. Yes, it's traditionally associated with OS X, but that's just because nobody else uses it. I don't believe Apple has a trademark on it or anything like that. As an added bonus, it even has a Unicode code point – U+2318.


1

It is a notification that the software and hardware checks have passed (with no beep codes), and that the user is now able to access an operating system through a command interface shell or an associated GUI (Graphical User Interface) desktop.


1

The issue of focus stealing is well-known. In the Linux world, some desktop environments like Xfce have options to prevent it. GNOME 3 also prevents it by default. In terms of security, the reality is a lot more complex, as until recently (~2011 and forward), graphic stacks had little to no protection against unprivileged apps listening in on the keyboard ...


1

Not a distribution, but GNOME also has a Design team: https://wiki.gnome.org/Design


1

The visual 'files and folders thing' goes back to the original Apple Mac 'Classic' interface in 1984 ( which in itself was influenced by the Xerox Star interface). Users didn't really have to think about hierarchies so much as putting files inside files inside files. Before that if you used a computer what you got was the command line interface of DOS. ...


1

Issues for both novice and expert users: I would say that nested hierarchies of folders have fundamental issues for both expert and novice users, but we have kind of squared with it and learned to manage it as good as we can. There are at least two problem areas that I can think of: 1- Finding existing documents: To find a file or a document you ...


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