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There are a number of other ways you can look at as well The walk-through approach : The walk-through approach walks your users through the app like how Google does it. Its also called the joyriding approach. To quote this article The “joyriding” approach walks the user through the features of an app or highlights the key features. It’s great because ...


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Three things: Look at every piece of information you're asking for. What will you do with it? For example, why are you asking for phone number? Will you ever actually call a user? If not, then don't ask for it. What are you doing with number of employees? (These are rhetorical questions. No need to answer them for us. Just think about it.) Ask for ...


8

How long ? As long as the user needs to learn about the features available in the site or the web application. Now coming to the options you have Doing a complete introduction of all the features : This is also called joyriding where you give the person a quick walkthrough of all the features and give him a quick summary. However while this helps in ...


7

Disclaimer: this is purely speculation. Perhaps it is due to the differences in a user's barrier to entry. A website requires far less commitment than an application. Downloading an application can be seen as an indication of a certain level of interest, whereas a website more easily allows a user to only express a temporary commitment as a fleeting ...


5

I'm pretty sure we've answered this before, but since I can't find it ... Both It's good practice to have a lightweight sign-in that allows the user to stay right where they are (with dynamic refresh of relevant components). Same for registration: you want to lower the barrier to creating an account, so a simple modal panel with the bare minimum data ...


5

By default an Android application minimizes and returns to the home screen when it is no longer possible to go back further inside the app itself. Deviating from such a pattern is likely to result in irritation and annoyance amongst users. Or as the say in the android guidelines Consistent navigation is an essential component of the overall user ...


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On-boarding content/widget. On-boarding implies process that takes after hiring/signup/registration. Then you can get more descriptive. On-boarding Tutorial On-boarding Promo


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If I understand correctly, a simple "seal of approval" is actually rather detrimental to the idea of user centered design, and especially to the practitioner's merit. Any approval (or disapproval) should be met with rationale; that is how one raises awareness and illustrates skills needed to achieve good products. You can't put that in a stamp. If a Human ...


4

The language you use for this message will make a difference; show a popup with some cool message and an options like: Complete your profile and Ask me later buttons, and then analyze the button hit ratio - it will depend on the improtance of completing profile on the site. Also, show a profile completion chart like LinkedIn does:


4

Ask for the user's information at the time when they need to provide it. For example, don't ask for their shipping address until they're placing an order. Don't ask for their phone number until they ask for a phone call. Don't ask them to allow access to their camera until they click the "Take a Photo" control. When these requests come in context, they ...


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That design pattern is a multi-branching wizard. Wizards are ideal for walking users through steps to configure an application, service, or act as a more interactive form. UX Planet Article on Wizards and Best Practices Additional article on Multi-Branching Forms


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Do it the linked in way. Have a progress bar, showing how much their profile is complete. Gamify it or provide rewards (if possible) as and when users complete their profiles. So, you could have the user land on your main & important landing page after onboarding. Where, the user could the progress bar.


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I think the best way to get the user onboard, in this case, would be to show why do you need all the information, and what the user will gain by inputing it on the app. This article suggest a series of steps for great user onboarding. The first two are: Remind users why they need your product You could give the user some examples of the value the app would ...


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I think asking for address is too specific, the fact that competitors do it does not mean you should as well. The user doesn’t know is industry standard, they only care about their privacy. That being said, you don’t need to ask for an address to personalize weather data since weather changes by regions and not addresses. You can ask for a less specific ...


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I recently wrote an elaborate article that lists some awesome ideas to make your User Onboarding Experience smoother. - 10 Ways You Can Make Your User Onboarding Experience Irresistible! (With Examples) Although, I'd recommend you to read the article, here are some of the ideas that I think you should implement. 1. Automate a getting started session like ...


3

I have never found multi-paged registration processes to be required. Most of the time I opt for a 'progressive disclosure' model where the user is only asked for details when they are needed for a particular operation. Lets say that you want to capture the users email, name, postal address, credit card details, and date of birth. If you ask for it all up ...


3

Be careful of using methods that would prevent some of your users from entering their actual names. Names are extremely personal and being told 'you can't use your real name' isn't going to sit well with everyone. I remember dealing with a customer at least once a month who was upset that she couldn't use her hyphenated name (this was a rarely-accessed ...


3

This question will likely generate opinion-based answers. Here's one: phone verification should be performed during signup, when you're already asking for personal information. That way when the user is hungry and uses the app, they won't have an extra hurdle to go through to get their order in.


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These look like stylized vertical tabs. (I've taken a look at what appears to be the source page of your image --https://www.fullstory.com/features/ ) Examples of vertical tabs CSS & JavaScript (w3 Schools) -- https://www.w3schools.com/howto/howto_js_vertical_tabs.asp CSS Only (CodePen) -- https://codepen.io/nik-savchenko/pen/xDIAe Bootstrap ...


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Based on the information you've provided there seems to be three different user types for your product Doctors Patients Pharmacists Unless appropriate exploratory research has been made already, there seems to be a few assumptions made: All three user types will be tech-savvy enough to be willing to adopt new digital products Doctors' and pharmacists' ...


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Maybe at the onboarding stage (if the technical limitations allow it) say, "hey we think you're in Paris, we will show you X for this area. If this is wrong update X" Making the user optionally correct an assumption could yield better results for you.


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The less friction you can put in front a user who wants to register with your site, the better. If your onboarding process is too complex, you will lose users. I would get the user signed up with the absolute minimum of information necessary, then maybe on subsequent visits give them reminders to fill in the rest of the data. For example, "If you are not ...


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My recommendation here is to do some research and learn from your first-time users. Learn what they are struggling with in the first steps after signing up for the platform. Do they need to populate that dashboard? How are they going to do that? Is that clear for them? :)


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Honestly, when there's nothing for them to do, keeping their engagement is going to be an uphill battle. For me, when signing up for these kinds of tools, what helps the most is getting an email when there IS enough data. Odds are, I've forgotten I signed up and wandered off, and getting notification that there's now something worth looking at is often ...


2

I recommend considering social verification instead of email, because that's the way modern mobile operating systems are built. iOS (and Android, though I'm less familiar with the Android OS) has moved decisively in the direction of social verification by allowing users to sign into their Facebook account at the device level. They even pop an interstitial '...


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Unless you're really, really concerned about the authenticity of users' email addresses - skip the 2nd step. If, for some reason, you want users to sign up with their real identities - again skip the 2nd step and use Facebook authentication or something similar instead.


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Only ask for a phone number if having it provides additional capability. For example, if you implement a process to text a confirmation code to the number, you could show a "Number Verified" badge next to those users. TradeMe (New Zealand's dominant online auction site) does a similar thing with "Address Verified" - it's optional, but gives other users ...


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Progress and feedback: The effects of providing progress feedback to users is well documented and proven to increase task completion rates and overall satisfaction. The rationale hinges on the idea that users who perceive that they are making progress are more likely to complete the task. Consider the following metaphor: A friend tries to encourage you by ...


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This is not a research, but a great article for input with lots of examples for progress steps: Progress trackers in web design


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I don't provide any evidence or proof of best practice, but I've noticed a good thing in TripAdvisor. I signed up over a year ago, didn't think much about it and got one or two e-mail. Since I didn't care, the e-mail stopped coming. However, I started posting stuff to TripAdvisor after our latest combined trip of Iceland and New York (just for the record :))...


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