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Display a banner at the top of the blog that indicates a published translation for this section is not yet available, but still show the original language. If you display the original language, a user can do with it what they wish. Often times, browsers can automatically detect the foreign language and offer to translate automatically. Alternatively, this ...


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The best solution is provided by Google Translate: there is just one textarea. Users can set language with some buttons or the system suggest them the language detected. If you want limit the range of languages the feedback could be: "language not supported" Technically you can do it with the Google Translate API


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I think you're over complicating things. Different languages have different ways of displaying information. If a language, say: Greek, or Hebrew, or Arabic or Chinese doesn't use the A,B,C,D notation structure then use what is most commonly used in that language. If Greeks use α, β, γ, δ instead of A, B, C, D then use α, β, γ, δ. How do you find out ...


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By combining the stories English speakers browsing medium may not understand the Chinese title and therefore won't click into the post, and visa versa, therefore you are loosing that traffic. I would suggest you create separate posts and provide a link to the other. Read this post in English here and repeat the same way in Chinese. This way you can ...


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Of your four alternatives, #3 and #4 would be excessively confusing; don't do them. #1 and #2 are both acceptable, but I would tend toward a modification of #2: Show the language selector, but in a way such that it's clear that there isn't a translation available for a specific language. For example: If you normally use flag icons, replace the flag for ...


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I would go with the second option with a slight modification Modification When User hovers over this disabled button, a popover can be displayed which tells the user that this page is only available with one language


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I would have the email in the main language, let's say English, and then on the side have a column that says "view email in other languages" and you click the preferred language that takes you to a website with translated version.


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In the end I provided a menu inside the content from which they can switch between version and manage publication. The flag on the floating bar allow to switch language quickly.


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Use the Language Name in Its Local Format As others have mentioned, language does not have a one to one correlation to a country. Many countries have several languages. Here is a list of multilingual countries: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_multilingual_countries_and_regions Besides the multilingual countries, there are multilingual individuals who ...


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Numbering the question would make more sense since this is a questionnaire. This would help the participants know their progress.


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It is better to keep the buttons with a shorter, clear text, but my opinion is you shouldn't take this like the most important rule and forget about the importance of the message you want the user understand. For example, basecamp has buttons that appear on two lines on mobile. It is interesting to see also the old design. I saw the image below on an ...


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No 2 will look very bad specially in mobile version. And with auto translation multi-line button can look pretty bad as its height would be long. so you are left with the lone option option 1 which is always considered to be the best approach. Hope this helps!


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If you are asking this, your website definitely has a considerable amount of multi-linguist customer or user base. Then, it is preferable to have it as a optional selection while loading your website or the language selection has to sit on your home page. Usually, one/two letters can reveal the language. EN for English. The advantage with this kind of ...


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The language switch should definitely not be hidden - not on desktop nor on mobile. If the requirements are to have an international website, you have to have a visible toggle - no matter how many people are coming to the site. Put yourself in user's shoes: you have to do business with a Japanese company and come to their site. Language toggle is nowhere ...


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If you expect a to get international traffic then it ought to be visible. One solution may be displaying the language option in the initial login / registration screen. You may even want to have users explicitly opt in to a preferred language (and then have an animation that shows that the language option lives in the hamburger / gear / whatever). If ...


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