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74

It may very well be universally understood but I would be concerned (or at least keep in mind) the user's reaction to this symbol. Would a Russian (a patriotic Russian) be happy to see money be symbolized by the US dollar? Is there any chance that he may think poorly of your site / app for using the dollar sign? I don't know your customer base but at first ...


66

Context matters a lot here. Like others mentioned, localization and your primary userbase should inform you whether to use $, €, £ or ¥ as 'standard' symbol. It might also be possible to do a location-check (via GPS, or IP) and display whichever icon is most appropriate. If you don't know your userbase's location or currency, you could choose to go with ¤, ...


53

Another option would be for the text field to ignore all non-numeric characters, and display appropriate formatting automatically. For example: User enters '3' -> Text field displays '0.03' User enters '4' -> Text field displays '0.34' User enters ',' -> Text field displays '0.34' (no change) User enters '5' -> Text field displays '3.45' User ...


49

I think this is referred to as a "near-miss" mechanic. Artificially increasing the frequency of near-misses, or artificially inflating the prize that was nearly missed, is illegal for slot machines in many areas. Study on psychology of the near-miss


41

Surely the best symbol for currency that will be universally understood would be a note and coin as every currency uses both paper notes and coins most currencies use banknotes and coins. Given this is a simple symbol for "currency", agnostic to culture, the great majority wouldn't have heard of cryptocurrencies, and may have once heard of Bitcoin so they ...


36

Let's talk for a minute about user expectations and magic. A user comes to your tool with certain expectations, and not every user's expectations are the same. You're seeing this first-hand. Culture, up-bringing and life experience all shape how a user will interact with a tool, opening a vast array of expectations to potentially meet. One expectation ...


27

Show the user what's expected visually and show how the machine interprets the user's input. My contribution to the brainstorm would be: Use a reference to the cheque-form of the old days :) Let the computer ignore all comma's and periods that the user enters (for that matter: non-numerical characters) Show (if you're able to) an image in the background ...


26

Historically, this question has been debated for quite a long time. There is a "Generic Currency Symbol," which looks like "¤" which has been used since at least 1985, where it was included in ISO 8859-1 (Latin-1). In theory, that is the symbol you want. However, I have never seen it used outside of reading about the code pages themselves, so that just ...


25

You can do whatever you wish basically, as long as you provide a way to verify the input. I would personally dynamically display --next to the input field-- the amount at least partially written out, like [ 123.45 ] (123 US dollars, 45 cents) [ 123,45 ] (123 US dollars, 45 cents) [ 123,456.78 ] (123 456 US dollars, 78 cents) [ 123,456 ] (123 456 ...


21

Consistency is key here I think. So, for currency, always use two decimals and align every number to the right. It took me some time to make sense of the table you displayed in your post. I would go for something like this: tender qty amt 5.00 1 5.00 10.00 1 10.00 100.00 1 100.00 0.05 1 0.05 0.10 1 ...


19

The answer is simply of course, absolutely not and it's surprising there is so much humming-and-hawing about it here. It's an extremely US-centric idea, it's "just silly" if you will. Indeed the dollar symbol is often used in say political cartoons, financial cartoons, very much as a symbol of the US broadly. If (for some reason) you wanted to use one ...


15

Lots of people have given good reasons. I don't think you'll get many Russians growing too irate at the $ sign but it is an interesting thought. Another possible problem with the $ sign is it could lead people to thinking costs are in dollars. Which dollars is this? It needs to be clearly said or else you could get a particularly ignorant Australian not ...


15

Using words isn't a bad idea at all. It's the most 'easy to understand' way for everyone. You can make a dropdown list after the input, containing: No unit Thousand Million Milliard The "no unit" option is for small amounts. Plus you can give people the chance to manually type all the zeroes if they want (or even the mathematical abbreviations, like 2x10^...


13

You could create two fields - 1 for dollars and 1 for cents. In this way you don't need any formatting logic and you can strip out any non-alphanumeric characters when you save to a database.


8

I'm from a country that is not using dollars as a currency. Creating an app depicting money using $$$ symbols would be silly. I mean if you are 10 years old, making an app for friends, then go for it. But if you are a professional and don't want other people laughing at it simply forget about it. Depicting money as green bills or gold coins would be OK, ...


7

I've written a comprehensive guide to designing effective data tables which should help you here. It's a long article with lots of visual examples. The sections are listed below. 1) Meet the audience’s expectations 2) Order data to match the purpose of the table 3) Remove clutter 4) Create a visual hierarchy 5) Round numbers and avoid ...


7

Locale is what this question is about. The fact that your users have to handle US dollars, does not mean they will do so in the locale of the 'owner' of this particular currency unit (USA). Date formats are another example of how different locales can render a value in ways that are ambiguous without knowledge of the locale the value was rendered in. How a ...


6

$100.00 - does not impart enough information to an international user. The '$' symbol (and many other currency symbols) are used by multiple countries. USD 100.00 - is not generally the order used, and if someone doesn't know what "USD" means they could be lost. 100.00 USD - is better, but still suffers from the "USD" issue. Also, as I scan "100" is a ...


6

To non-dollar users, the '$' is understood as a foreign dollar of some kind, just as the Netflix icon for many people in the world gets recognized as the universal symbol for a movie that is "not available in [their/your] region". You can say "patriotism" is the cause (as the accepted answer seems to have), or you can say pavlovian training is the cause,...


6

The UX solution is to make it error free for the users no matter what format they're used to. Nothing more. Nothing Less. I would recommend that you look into regex type solution: make certain there are two digits after the comma (add a 0 if necessary) then strip out all non-digits then add the decimal point. 345,6 becomes 345,60 becomes ...


6

It looks like you reward users based on quantity rather than quality. Typically users will follow the trail you set up, and will answer many questions instead of producing a few quality answers. To get a quality site where users want to spend and earn money, you need to strive towards counting votes instead of answers. If you change your numbers from ...


5

Aside from the localisation issues, ¤, $, £ etc. are symbols of currency, not money. Since the stated goal is to create an icon depicting an invoice, how about simply using a basic calculation, for example: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups or simply download bmml source


5

First of all you should choose a way to display the data, and always show it the same way, for consistency. Then: Align monetary data to the right. This allows you to easily compare if a value is bigger than another Be consistent with the decimal point. If you choose to show two decimal values, always display them. If the column only displays monetary ...


5

The quick and straight forward answer is: just say what you mean. "You currently owe 39.00" It speaks the same language as the user and removes the ambiguity. Small differences in language make a big difference, and can often times mean different things to different people who speak the same language. Perhaps it is a cultural difference in the ...


5

The banking site I use in Belgium only allows you to input the decimal notation but not the thousands separator. It accepts either a single comma or a single dot for the decimal notation, but nothing else can be input. I've done some more testing of how they treat the input field. You can only use , or a . once for the decimal notation, no thousands ...


4

As best I can tell, this specific mechanic likely originated in video slot machines. However, I don't believe there's a specific terminology for it. The mechanic itself is rather simple, any item other than the one selected uses a psuedo-random number generator (PRNG) to determine what it is. This can either be weighted to show higher-value items or may be ...


4

Remember that a bad user experience is all about Expectation vs Outcome Mismatch So when a user is entering into an input field, he just expects to fill the field, but when it gets masked automatically(outcome), there is an expectation-outcome mismatch. And hence the irritation. A simple solution to this is providing a good PLACEHOLDER with the assumed ...


3

The $ is universally accepted as being US dollars. The Euro or British Pound use a different symbol. Usually, it's used to show an amount for when you want to buy something. If I see symbols like €, £ or ¥, I know to look up the conversion rate to figure out how much $ will be coming out of my bank account. Use $ if you want to get paid in US dollars. If you'...


3

For consumer websites it's important not to use words (e.g. financial terms) which can be confusing to a broad audience. If you need to communicate a complex concept like an account balance, you can do so simply but also provide some additional explanatory text in case the user needs clarification:


3

A lot of budgetary apps on iOS that use the telephone keyboard use the convention of displaying the input preformatted with a currency sign at the beginning and the decimal/period number built in: As the user presses numbers, they display preformatted. No need for the user to add the decimal/point themselves. For example, I pressed the numbers 1, 2, 3, and ...


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