Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

27

TL;DR: Not that popular currently but might become so again in the future. In your case I'd look for an additional option if possible. Edit: Because of RonJohn's comment and the many people who agreed, I decided to remake the charts in "true" form, so the numbers look less manipulative. Scanova.io cites a few surveys across the years and claims it's on the ...


23

In the end, both ways lead to the same result. Whether it's an inline error or maybe a bubble with feedback, the user gets to know why he can't proceed (which adheres to visibility of system status). The point about disabled elements never having an action is understandable, but strictly clinging to this rule is not really of service to the user. If he ...


12

In the US and Western Europe it's not used much. The stats are actually quite dismal. I see very few applications generating interest in QR codes. Skiing and hiking trails where one doesn't need to take off ones gloves is a niche-market exception. On the other hand QR codes are really big in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea so if your market has a ...


10

If this weren't mobile, I'd say it would be better to have a message shown next to the disabled button saying Please fill in the remaining required fields (marked with *) or some such (wordsmithing required). But for mobile, where you don't have that real estate, having the button active (not disabled) and having it tell the user what fields they still ...


8

Also - you can customize / brand your QR codes to make them more visually intriguing – so long as you build in around 30% error correction. Here's a couple of examples one some I did (way back in the day).


7

I've actually done a fair amount of work with QR codes in the past. It all depends on their implementation. If you simply slap a QR code on a poster - not so helpful. If it has a purpose and an incentive - people WILL scan them. They are widely popular in some countries. Basically - you've gotta give someone a reason to scan it.


6

The fields should be configured in a way that directly relates to what data goes into it. So, in this case, while it might be slightly easier to input the numbers with the tel format, that's not what the data actually is. You're breaking syntax rules. This has implications on accessibility, among other things. You don't want a screenreader user being ...


6

This article should give you a better perspective on the use of Carousels on mobiles - Carousels on Mobile Devices Dots are generally weak signifiers which basically means that they could be overlooked or missed if the size/color/contrast is not appropriate. Half images are strong signifiers as they create an illusion of continuity. I personally prefer ...


6

Empty States What you're referring to is known in the software world as an "empty state". It can be just like it sounds: empty. But if you're smart, it becomes a delightful training tool. The idea is to have a state in your app that detects the absence of content and fill it with something helpful or delightful for the user. Doing empty right means you'...


6

This is how the Google sign-up process does it. It should be very similar to your process. Note that the primary button is always enabled, it only changes its function! You are presented with a pretty self-explanatory form The Next button has the primary color and can be clicked. Note that the secondary button takes you to a completely different process (...


5

Try not to think of A as "least accessible" and AAA as "most accessible". A is the minimum set that you need to create an accessible website. There will still be some issues for some users when you're only working towards A, but A is way better than nothing. AA makes the site accessible to more people. W3C does not recommend trying to achieve AAA. See "...


5

I can understand why you wouldn't want to use the input field, as this increases the effort the user needs to use the filter. But in cases like yours where you have described, you don't have a concrete range, the input field is the best solution. The other solution you can use is to have ranges for the most common ones and also have the current input field ...


5

You should have a QR code, whether on screen or paper. It is important to note that both Android and iOS come with default QR readers. QR code is the easiest way to pass a URL. Unless your application is on the App Store, it will be difficult to get to the application download page without a QR code.


4

Design should be focused on the business, and also be usable and pleasant for users. Drawing attention for the deal is good both for business, and the users: the business will sell, and a user will not miss a deal (Win-Win!). This is a wide field of A/B testing to get the best design, which will be proven and backed by numbers. So you can start from some ...


4

The keyboard with the numbers row on top! Whether it is the visible-password keyboard, or default keyboard that has the numbers row added to the top (enabled by default), what matters is having the numbers row added. I do not think the visible-password keyboard is hacky. Just an opinion. Take these scenarios: 1- Numbers row is added and autoCapitalize ="...


4

Don't use a different application to define patterns and actions for your needs The screenshots here are (presumably) from the Google Drive app where "Starred" isn't a standalone page. Here, "Shared with me", "Recent", "Starred", etc. are sub-divisions of the "My Drive" screens. Therefore, it makes sense for the app to lead the user to the "My Drive" screen ...


4

In your situation try to avoid the empty state. If you join an app/community & it’s a ghost town, why would you ever return? As an extension of this, if you have smart coders who can build bots, you can then start to brainstorm how to duplicate such strategies on other platforms where your target audience is currently. Even it was for Reddit before they ...


4

The UX answer would be to provide the best experience for your customers. If full-width is your solution then you will need to create and implement designs for multiple break points. To answer your question directly. No. 980px is useful as approximation for a desktop users. It works on designs for 1024 and above. Example: a design with side margins.


4

Two things that I would consider in researching this: Perceived Security of Mobile Browsing Research suggests that users view their mobile devices as less secure than their desktop. This could lead to them not wanting to input private data like credit card info into a mobile browser/app checkout. Link to PowerPoint on Perceptions of Risk in Mobile ...


4

Going by the concept of 'informed decisions', it is always better to provide users with enough directions so that they do not make any mistakes instead of letting them find out that what they did was all wrong. If the form fields have required marked on them with an asterisk * or in some other way along with the other design intentions, the form will be ...


4

Adding an extra step to present the options in a dialog is also an option (if this task is not used often and is not tied to efficiency, so the extra step won't hurt a lot): Similar to this choice dialog in the Material Guidelines (but without the extra confirmation step):


3

No. You can never expect a particular feature to be implemented the same way across all varieties and vendors of a type of software. Heck. Often companies and platforms even have internal differences; try doing a google search for all the types of sliders in Photoshop, Illustrator etcetera. And regarding this particular instance, a 1 minute search in the ...


3

If the 90% use case is a specific option, you can label it 'recommended', and explain why if needed. Is the act of selection explicit? If you want to keep the action of choosing an option up to the customer (it sounds like your use case requires a choice), you can lead them to the most common with a simple label showing what the vast majority do. Ordering ...


3

I echo @Shreyas point: Do not adopt "a different application to define patterns and actions for your needs". Now to answer your question: I would definitely bring the user back to the "My Drive" page for the following reasons: 1- It is the page where the user was at before (even if some argue that it is a not a root view page), and it is a Back button, ...


3

It may seem obvious to you because you're the one designing it, but here's why your end users don't think it's obvious enough: The second hamburger icon that's sitting next to "Your Dashboard" title does not appear to be a navigation button, but more of a decorative icon to indicate where the user currently lands at. Why you shouldn't use the hamburger ...


3

According to Fitt's Law - The time to acquire a target is a function of the distance to and size of the target. I agree that I think distance between the menu and the bottom sheet is substantial. This solution allows placing a lot options in one place. No you don't missing something - it's a good practise. The other solution in this circumstances is ...


3

The less friction you can put in front a user who wants to register with your site, the better. If your onboarding process is too complex, you will lose users. I would get the user signed up with the absolute minimum of information necessary, then maybe on subsequent visits give them reminders to fill in the rest of the data. For example, "If you are not ...


3

I feel like there are many valid reasons for this design decision. You already stated one by yourself: docks and other accessories wouldn't really work with the port being on top on the phone. Another thing that comes to mind, is that electrical sockets tend to be placed relatively low (As stated here: Example1, Example2 - might vary for certain regions, ...


3

Make sure that all the fields in your accordion are closed upon error check (on SAVE button press I assume) Display a contextual error message next to the SAVE button [OPTIONAL] Disable the SAVE button unless all the errors are fixed


3

This is a good question but I am afraid the answers are going to be opinionated. My answer is based on my experiences with various apps. When a two-step exit is helpful On feed-based apps that don't/can't retain the current scroll position 9gag is actually a funny example as it does retain the scroll position. So, an accidental exit isn't as detrimental. ...


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