35

Make the title of the workout the same as the active click colour, so that it prompts users to click on the title. Even if the whole card is active - it gives the user something to focus on.


13

I recently did some testing with a similar design where the cards were not tappable, only the button like your "Start". The participants mostly expect cards and tiles to be tappable IF there is only one action. They also tended to click on the headers. In your design, I would think that tapping the card would start the workout, so if you want to have two ...


9

The UI isn't using colors well. The red button at the top is connected with the red button at the bottom. Most users will have to do discovery to figure out that there are black buttons, blue buttons, grey buttons, and green ones too. Get the colors unified so users can easily read your interface and help users by giving them steps. Your current UI is ...


9

Your users care more about accomplishing their tasks than your brand (or your logo). Focus all your efforts on moving them forward towards improving their lives. They will come back if you are successful in doing that. Oftentimes this kind of push can come from a marketing dept that is under pressure to build awareness. The best brand awareness will come ...


8

The user should have access to the "CLOSE" option anytime during the session. However, the CLOSE button should not deter from doing the primary task in the screen (browsing history or purchases) by taking up so much space. I suggest the CLOSE option to be more integrated into the overall app navigation. For example, you could use a back button in the ...


8

There's nothing wrong with having clickable cards. An example of that is YouTube: when you're browsing a list of videos, each video is represented with a card. Notice that the card also has a "show more" button, which brings up a dropdown menu with additional actions. Most of the time, however, the user will just want to watch the video, and so that's what ...


7

The behavior of "clicking brand logo links to homepage" is well established. If you plan to hide action options under the logo it would cause confusion. Since you have a hypothesis to test, I suggest you run a test asking what users would expect to happen when clicking the floating action button. Or, you could assign a task requiring the user use one of the ...


7

Material Design is just a guideline. From the Material Design footer: Material is an adaptable system of guidelines, components, and tools that support the best practices of user interface design. Every component can be themed for example according to brand. https://material.io/design/material-theming/overview.html# Material Design comes designed ...


7

I think when a big chunky object represents an action by interacting with it directly (clicking, tapping, hovering, etc) there should be an explicit visual hint (especially given "Cards" in Material Design are not usually directly interactive). Forgive the crude mock-up, but I added chevrons to the cards and I think that makes it obvious they're clickable ...


6

Just log out straight away It's not a destructive action as they can just log back in if they made a mistake. They most likely will just want to log out so do it straight away rather than make the process longer than it needs to be.


5

Try not to think of A as "least accessible" and AAA as "most accessible". A is the minimum set that you need to create an accessible website. There will still be some issues for some users when you're only working towards A, but A is way better than nothing. AA makes the site accessible to more people. W3C does not recommend trying to achieve AAA. See "...


4

Well, one of the consequences is that you'll lose users who are not willing to share their phone number with you. I think I've shared my phone number and contacts list with only one app (WhatsApp); for a messenger app, it definitely makes sense to have those details. For other apps, not so much, and I'd rather not share sensitive data like my phone number ...


4

Some ideas: If you have a (modal) screen where a user needs to wait until certain information is loaded, submitted or calculated, you can show an advertisement underneath a progress bar. You can compare this to ads on railway stations. If your main screen consists of a list (e.g. news items), grid (e.g. photos) or something like a timeline, consider ...


3

When in doubt, I find that thinking about how a feature would work in the physical world is a good clue to how the digital feature should work. In the calendar on page 1, it makes sense that the items in the future are below the current items, as this is how every calendar is designed. Both digital and paper calendars move left to right (in western cultures)...


3

Airbnb Cereal is Airbnb's bespoke typeface (i.e. a typeface custom designed for the company to serve their needs) and can be used only by Airbnb and their partners in some way. So legally you are not allowed to use the font in your application.


3

1. Cards what is the best approach to make the users know these are buttons and can be pressed ? Follow the Material Design guidelines to provide better user experience for Android platform. Take a look on a Cards spec. There is no any reason to invent a bicycle here. 2. Content editing how can I make the user know that these numbers can be pressed ?...


3

As a user of an app, I'd not expect these in the app itself. For example, if your app crashes during launch because of a known issue, you wouldn't even be able to view the list. I'd expect a support website to be listed in the Play Store (or App Store for iOS apps). The Play Store offers the option (under Store Listing -> Contact -> Website) to specify a ...


3

There was a research done on that a couple of years ago. Have a look here: https://think.storage.googleapis.com/docs/mobile-page-speed-new-industry-benchmarks.pdf One of the first things they mention is: The average time it takes to fully load a mobile landing page is 22 seconds, according to a new analysis. Yet 53% of mobile site visitors leave a ...


3

I would go with a confirmation only after the user logged out. I know many users tend to check if they really signed out of their account by relaunching the app. Best practice is to do some A&B tests and see which one favors more.


3

In my opinion, this is an obvious dark pattern - the site seeks the attention of its users and encourages them to spend more time on it. The generic term for this is "alert fatigue" and there are multiple industries that have done studies about it, e.g., healthcare, aviation, autonomous cars. A few starting points could be: "Never cry wolf", a chapter from ...


3

As I'm designing for e-commerce for many years, through some tests I found out that the price is the most important thing in the checkout process, whilst everything close to purchase button attracts more attention. What users want to know is the price so they look for it even if it's not in the right place. And what they need to know is the payment method ...


2

There can be a right time and place for using coach marks, but you should aim to design in such a way that they are not needed, and necessary actions/flow are obvious to your users. The Nelson Norman Group has a lot of great points to make about this. Especially: Because users cannot read the hint overlay and use the app at the same time, they are ...


2

It's a more important good practice to do user tests. Have random users (who have never seen or used your app before) use your app while you watch. THe goal is to see how intuitive it is to random users (note the s, one test isn't enough, 30 5 is ideal). The goal of any interface is to be very intuitive. Doing this may help you see how you can improve the ...


2

The NNG website summarizes response times and need for feedback: Response Times: The 3 Important Limits In summary, 0.1 seconds for the UI to feel instantaneous. From 0.1 to 1.0 seconds the UI will have a noticable delay. After 1.0 seconds the user will feel their work is being interrupted. This is independent of the technology used for the user ...


2

Using the $ - $$$$ is a well defined pattern especially for restaurant pricing, you can compare how this is used for say take away locations to how a similar filter would work for real estate where the actual dollar amount must be used. So in short, if you are display the $$$$ for food/drink then it is a great option, if it is for something with more ...


2

I think the question is too vague at this point to be answered. For instance facebook notification strategy is multichannel effort involving push notifications, email and desktop notifications. Knowing facebook their strategy is secret, super-technical and quite elaborate. However Google has tried to provide some guidelines for developers on how ...


2

Definitely 1). Save the data in between, and organize the questions in ways that help the user chunk out the process in a logical way without feeling overwhelmed.


2

If I was in your positon I would go with some of next options: - very bottom 10 - 15% of the screen, without covering important functionalities, and with clear X to close / minimize - if some important functionalities are on the bottom, same thing mentioned just on top - "Floating action button". If you google this, you will see in material design it ...


2

A title is what the page is about--it describes the page. If the page is about the application, you can make that the title. If the page is about something else, make the title "Something Else".


2

Use filters to view outstanding items, and an archive can show a 'Sent' history and timestamp. Since you have a potentially long list, give the power of filtering, so that states that are urgent 'Pending', 'Waiting', etc... are shown with the number of items outstanding. Filter the view so long lists can be dealt with. If you have their address, you can ...


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