79

It won't be as black and white as that. For instance - if it's a weather website and there is a button on there for Report a Tsunami then that's almost never going to get clicked, but that doesn't mean it's not needed. It's all going to depend on a variety of factors. Business requirements / politics dictating that features need to be present, legal ...


43

As always, XKCD has an appropriate comic: If you have a button on your website that is very rarely used, consider that the people who use that button might rely on it more than you think. For example, Word has an option to insert an ActiveX object. I doubt many people use it nowadays, but it's still in there because some people do. Backwards compatibility ...


21

Stripe.com (a payments processor) offers an even more "immediate" sign-up process - they allow you to skip it all together. Any guest can begin using their dashboard and begin customising settings, testing mock transactions and making customer profiles before entering any sign-up information. No username, password or email. It's only when you want to go live ...


13

The click-through rate should not be your only consideration. Google's I'm Feeling Lucky button is used for less than 1% of searches. That 1% costs the company $110 million per year (in 2007) in lost revenue due to advertising being skipped. The button doesn't even work that well for getting you the optimal search result. Despite these drawbacks, Google ...


11

I like the answer of @JonW that is quite complete. I'd add a note: if the feature is polluting your view, you might want to hide it under a "advanced features" collapsible panel. It is important a person (especially a newcomer) can see the frequent operations right under his nose (typically grouped at the right, the top or on a flying panel with noticeable ...


7

The days of gaming search engines are behind us Build something people will want. Something with a good content to link ratio that shows you're actually giving something to the user. Linking to a blog under the same domain will earn you points for your work. Duplicating across pages will actually hurt you (depending on the algorithm du jour). Do not ...


5

Text label The text label has the advantage over an icon as being more easily understood. That is, if the copy is clear enough. You can be quite sure what action will trigger when you press 'Settings' for example. Icon But icons on the other hand, can be very ambiguous. A 'wrench' for example could mean all kinds of things 'Building tools', 'Settings', ......


4

I've drawn the diagram which could give you some insights. So your task is to design flow, that leads user to a decision point. Some acquired value and good experience before asking to Sign Up could create relation to a product or service and loss aversion effect. Still, if it isn't gained yet, user has a second chance. The moment of decision making can be ...


4

An alternative is doing as Material design deals with expansion panels: As you can see when a panel is expanded, it separates from the others to deal with this problem.


4

You can give a color to the background of content inside the accordion panel, such as #f4f4f4 or light grey which will improve the depth and more noticeable.


3

I can't tell you the exact reason that Spotify have chosen to do this but I can tell you why I might use it. The example page you shared here (Spotify) looks like it might be using an AJAX technique known by some as 'Lazy Loading'. This is where items are only loaded into the page just before they appear at the bottom of the viewport. Which means that the ...


3

First, let's call things by its name: in this case, when you say animation, you mean transition Not everything has to have a function, aesthetics values usually mean more than function (sad but true). It's basically the history of mankind and civilization. A gold Rolex will give you the time as accurately as a cheap digital watch. But.... would you prefer a ...


3

I think you have almost answered your own question. The button approach does a better job of conveying how the widget works, because it conforms to expected idiomatic behavior for the text input and the calendar button. The popup approach has a clearer entry point (only 1 control) and requires only 1 click (vs potential 2) for the user to see both input ...


2

I agree with BrianN's answer: skip the registration-first step. Here is an extended explanation of why this works best, which I feel complements his answer. You defined one of your goals as "get them signed up". But as a normal, white-hat business, this is not really your goal. Your goal is to get them to become regular users, whatever the definition of "...


2

Going with just your first mock-up is probably going to be your best bet (assuming those are text fields): ask for the user's measurements and provide them with good instructions on how to get them. The placeholder box on the left would be a good spot to load an instructional video (use JS to change videos for each location to measure, don't try and do a ...


2

OAuth With OAuth (facebook, twitter, Gmail intergration) you can grab the user's email address from whatever service you used to sign them up from and allow them to change it of they want and then they press save. That way, if the OAuth service provider decides to charge or discontinues the service you still have an email address that the user account is ...


2

you could have a washed out version of a highlighted color and have a coming soon message as a tooltip on hover. the highlighted color will give attention that this is something new (you could standardise this across your ui and assign a certain color for new features or links) at the same time have this link disabled with a faded version (e.g. disabled ...


2

Switches Use switches for Boolean values when something can be turned on/off, active/inactive, enabled/disabled, etc. Don't use them for two non-opposite values. For example, the "Allow simultaneous Heating/Cooling" option shows the options "No or ALERT". I'm sure this probably means "No", or "yes, but raise an alert about it," but at first glance, these ...


1

It depends how obvious it is that the button has changed from 'Edit' to 'Save'. Both are four letter words so the button size / length would be pretty similar. I would suggest changing the button colour to make the transformation more obvious and to make the 'Save' action stand out. Also button position should be considered in relation to what's being edited....


1

Amazon has figured out that most people think information lends credibility to the product. J. Peterman agrees, they (he?) basically make up stories (fluffy information) to build up some kind of product credibility. Check out Nordstrom's Ugg boot - more refined and cleaner than an Amazon page but still lots of information. I think the information glut is ...


1

I would suggest the 'Button' option however both have their own benefits and weaknesses. Reason against the 'Popup': Firstly, if you tab into a field rather than click it and a drop down calendar appears without your requesting it that can be distracting. Some users would prefer to type only and would rather not be confronted with a secondary input ...


1

That example you have gone with isn't ideal really. I would look at this from the perspective of how the user is interacting with the field. Take a keyboard user for instance. If they tab into a field then it is likely they will be expecting to manually type into that field. If the calender popup also appears, provided it isn't obstructing the form itself ...


1

Your client says that the menu shouldn't be distracting. This doesn't necessary mean that the menu shouldn't be visible. You can make sure that the content has more visual emphasis than the menu buttons. The eye should immediately be drawn by the content, not the buttons. The user will only notice them when they look around for something that looks like a ...


1

I am affraid you won't find a perfect solution here - to provide visibility and affordance (in a visual world) you need to keep some element visible. Showing more on hover is a good idea provided this is a desktop solution (you mentioned Chrome Web Store). There are pros and cons of both solutions you have mentioned: Triggering on click will make user ...


1

Have it be based on selected text. No selection = new snippet all selected = snippet with everything selected segment = snippet with selected segment You can provide a selector by hijacking the right click functionality to provide the menu, or simply provide it on hover. You should always have at least 2 means of accomplishing a task depending on the ...


1

Forgive me for answering with questions. 1. From the home page, click "sign up" (you are emailed a confirmation email at this time) How does it email you before it knows your email address? And why would a user want to "sign up" when they don't know anything about your site yet? 2. On sign up form, simple enter email address and click submit Why does ...


1

3 steps could be simplified here. 1- Have the e-mail form on the homepage itself. It would be unobtrusive, but saves the extra click and step 2- Consider skipping the need for e-mail confirmation before you can use the app. Confirm it after they've started using it instead. You could still ask them to set a password at the confirmation stage "To be able to ...


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