New answers tagged

1

Depending on your context, could you group informations like; -- Name, Age (or Name, City of residence) --> Skills (can be chips material element if it fits here) --> last contacted by Contact manager, on date --> Phone, Email If direct contact options brings you benefit you can place phone and email in form of actions. I.e. on mobile they can be action, ...


1

I answered something very similar not long ago: Should disabled buttons give feedback when clicked? Basically this is a viable solution as well, add an extra element on top of the disabled button, making it clear that there's more to it than just a disabled state:


2

Since you want the user to be aware of when the button can be used, you can do a few things: Add a text explaining that and why submitting is not possible yet. But you probably have no space for that. Let users discover themselves that the button can not yet be used. Thus stick with the normal button, it is the only way to be sure users are going to click ...


1

Sure, a Card can be square or rectangular. Generally it shouldn't be larger than the screen (or rather the content area within which it resides), particularly because the lists that cards are usually hosted in leverage a partially displayed card as an affordance for the presence of more cards (i.e. hinting that this Card exists within a List). Cards aim to ...


0

Two thoughts come to my head if I understand your question correctly. Both of these are using other Material UI components. If you need to allow the button to be clicked, have the button not disabled and on click, have a snackbar give the message to the user. If you can disable the button but want to give feedback on why it is disabled, use a Popover ...


0

I would consider using a tab bar if you are replicating a bottom navigation on android or segmented controls if you are replicating page tabs. If you have too many tabs to fit in either of these then I would consider using a landing page which lists all of the categories that the user can tap on to show the content of that list. You are in effect creating ...


2

I had to solve a similar problem recently. I had to turn all components in a screen read-only. Not disabled, but read-only, where user could interact with all values in the components, but not change it. The approach we took with buttons was: For web: on hover, the mouse cursor changed to the not-allowed state, with a tooltip informing the user why it was ...


0

about having columns in Material design card I think it's possible for a card to have rows and columns. It helps you organize information and easier responsive design. About card actions I ask this question and then decide about it. What is this card for? If it is for showing information and calling and sending mail are not primary flows for card I guess ...


1

So, drawing inspiration from James Coyle's and ADOConnection's ideas, I gave it multiple attempts and wanted to share my thoughts. First, this is how I initially planned it: Second, James' corner FAB. Not too sure about the color style yet, but since I wanted it to not be too prominent (since the options aren't that important) I couldn't use my accent ...


1

From the info you provided I see correlation with mobile games UI: custom-made home screen with few primary actions and some secondary actions custom-made navigation I think you can grab the same idea. Even if your UI is not that heavily drawn and does not look like cartoon frame, this pattern still applies and you dont need to use common navigation ...


0

I'm not sure why you would not want "to use one of the common navigation patterns" - users are familiar with them, they don't need to think about how they work, and they will feel in control of your app when the app behaves as the users expect them to do. Would you buy a car where the car designer had decided she didn't want "to be forced to use one of the ...


0

I may have missed something, but if you’re thinking of using the space to pull up the sheet, why not just stick to the common navigation pattern that users are familiar with? If the main stage content of the app is sufficiently engaging, users won’t mind the presence of a UI element they have become accustomed to consuming precious pixels lol. Best of luck!


3

Material design has a bottom navigation drawer: I would combine this with a corner floating action button to reveal it:


0

You could use an ellipse button like this: It means the links are more contextual when placed with the second portion of content, if I understand the problem correctly anyway. It also acts as a secondary level CTA as you mentioned they are "less" important pages.


2

In terms of User expectations, when entering into and using any Android app Users will likely expect to be able to access important information quickly and easily. It is unclear how Users will navigate between your two main pieces of content, but it seems that by pressing the More... button the Bottom Sheet will be displayed offering navigational menu items....


3

As context, I am a core contributor to the community driven Material Design Icons project. We recommend that icons are primarily used alongside text and not by themselves unless the purpose of the icon is clear within the context of the UI. If icons are used on their own they should generally be given a tooltip (and suitable aria attributes) to allow users ...


0

Unified search boxes work best when searching the pages of an app/site such as on social networks where you can search for posts, groups, users, etc which all have their own page. These search boxes should provide a dropdown selection of potential targets for the user and resolve to a search results page. For filtering a dataset, it is a better idea to ...


0

I'm also a new contributor. Here are some ideas about your first case. Firstly, is the "Search" button necessary? Maybe in a desktop app, users used to use "Enter" to confirm their search. But you need to put a "Search" icon in the text field to indicate the function. Secondly, I also think that the "Clear" text is improper. You can use a "Cross" icon. So ...


0

As long as the fill or outline is clearly visible and adheres to whatever contrast standard you wish to adhere to then the only real difference between the two fields is which looks better in your design. I tend to use filled when you need to draw attention to one or two inputs in a dense design as they have slightly more visual prominence especially on ...


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If you want to just check the visual side of accessibility (seeing that your examples aren't interactive prototypes, so they can't be tested for accessibility fully), you could go to WCAG 2.1, for example to see if colors and sizes are good enough. Target sizes For sizes, to achieve level "AAA" (which, arguably, means the buttons have good accessibility) ...


1

You have dismissed the findings of scientific studies simply because they are "old". That is a bad move until you find more recent studies that contradict the old findings. You will find that those studies generated findings based on human constraints rather than technological constraints. In the time between now and those studies, technologies may have been ...


1

Undo for deletion is by far more productive and less painful UX, consider using it. E.g. Snackbar with an Undo button. Deleting multiple items when there is a god-awful popup is some of the most cringe-worthy UX possible. How can one argue that Bottom Sheet is better than a Dialog? If it is easier to confirm/reject the Bottom Sheet than it is to do the same ...


0

You are effectively using a Bottom Navigation for the content title: consider using the Toolbar title for the content title and exposing other options in a Tab Navigation below it (replace the search input, moving search into Toolbar as an action if need be) OR as a Bottom Navigation. For the Add Drug button, you may find a FAB makes this call to action "...


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