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140

They have (slightly) different meanings and usage Although both icons are similar and both are popularly recognized, they do have slightly different connotations. ❤ The heart icon Is more emotive by its very nature. As such, it's more likely to be associated with positive feelings such as love, like, happy, etc. Is used by popular applications such as ...


94

If your mapping framework provides the feature, highlighting a "suburb" might be appropriate for your use case. Of course the actual size of what is considered a suburb varies widely from region to region. This screenshot shows google maps highlighting the suburb of Tanunda, South Australia.


85

Spell it out to the user. You don't want to leave them guessing so I would recommend you add a simple addition to your UI. Note the change of language in the search box. By saying choose location you are more or less saying "do it here", whereby now it is clear it is just one of two options.


52

Just to think outside the box I've decided to paste a radical suggestion to this, as I have called it "map-tap" problem :) Imagine if a low opacity touch gesture image appeared over the map either for a few seconds and then disappear or it would stay there, lingering like a ghost, hinting to the user what to do. When a user taps the map it would disappear. ...


51

I would not use the map as a user interface when the address is still private information. Because, the map is used to represent precise locations at some level you will always run into the issue of privacy. The map is useful if the user gets to choose events they would like to attend based on location. So I question the usefulness of a map of events if ...


39

UPDATE: For a timeline-like view (Not just point A to B) I'll take the example of Google Maps for just the timeline view in addition to the map-tracks where they represent different trips with colors. However, the color representation isn't very clear if you ask me as it doesn't take color-blindness into consideration as was pointed out by other users here. ...


24

Having the cartographic point of view, in my opionion, clustering can definitely be the way to go in such a case. In the following example, points which are very close to each other: spread out when clicking on them: (screenshot source) You can also combine it with the "traditional" way of clustering. This means, when you reach your maximal zoom level and ...


23

I found Instagram really handy when it came to its map functionality. Maybe you could use something similar to this one since it seems less cluttered it is clear how many items there are when you click, you could show on the right or left part of the screen the list of the places that they are there


21

You could de-emphasize the search field, e.g. by not showing it by default. Just say "Choose a location" in the head of the screen, and have a magnifying glass button that pops up the search field for people who want to enter an address. Something like this: Even if you don't go with this approach, you might want to adjust your text sizes and wording. "...


20

I think the difference between the two isn't huge, both are frequently used for the feature you are describing. Perhaps thinking of the emotion you are trying to evoke is more important. For example, a favourite on this site is represented by a star. This makes sense, it's a 'professional' site. Whereas if I'm on a site like say AirBNB, a heart makes ...


19

Have you considered moving the map, rather than moving the "pin"? Scrolling a map is a common action in most map applications, if you keep the reticule static and move the map underneath it, the user can target their desired position. The text in the box should update as the user scrolls. This might allow you to get away with no additional help messaging. ...


18

Use Animation Assuming the main use case is on a digital device, utilizing animation will not add any additional clutter to your UI, but will effectively communicate the direction of travel. For example, you could show a quick pulse that travels the path from start to end, similar to some Windows loading animations. Alternatively, you could use a subtle ...


15

Another option, not sure if you've considered this: Ask the person setting up the event for a nearby public landmark (library, shopping center, etc.). Then use that location. That saves you from needing a lot of local knowledge and should handle a pretty wide variety of population densities. It also nicely handles things like rivers. Around here, for ...


14

Your idea sounds like a reasonable solution. I would, however, ensure that this offset is not just randomly generated every time the map loads... With enough randomly-generated offsets, it would be possible to derive the actual center of this distribution. Additionally, if you'd like to really emphasize that it's a general area, don't display a defined ...


12

Since users are likely to see the entry form first, how about using the placeholder text for this? "Enter location or just pick from map ..."


12

So there are two approaches coming from a cartographic standpoint that could work in your situation, but it depends on what you want the user to do with these markers. The first involves the user using these as just a visual aid meaning they would have no interactivity and be just static images to inform the user. In this case, I would a pie chart marker ...


11

The fact is, it doesn't matter what you think. You shouldn't disable scroll wheel zoom just because it's better for you because you are not your typical user. For those using Google Maps embedded into your page, users are going to have have some pre-conceived expectations of how it should behave - i.e. they expect it to behave like Google Maps in its normal ...


10

You are probably asking this because your into implementing it as a developer. The API of the most used map, Google Maps, call these needles for "markers". I'd guess this is the most technically correct word to use. Reference: Google Maps API Markers However I guess your target audience isn't developers and in there daily life call the needles &...


9

Since the objective is to favorite a location in a mobile the recommendation would be a GEO-HEART. This is the ideal graphical representation to portray the favorite location.


9

tl;dr: It's a sheet. The pattern is related to the persistent bottom sheet element on mobile. The MD guidelines actually reference the map example specifically when explaining this approach: On desktop, content ordinarily presented in a persistent bottom sheet might move onto a new sheet of material. On larger screens it may be more appropriate to ...


9

Another option is to use a gradient on the path. It isn't necessarily immediately apparent, but after continued usage users are likely to pick up on the trend. An example of this is Lyft:


9

You’re asking slightly the wrong question. As anyone who has watched a usability test will tell you, if you add a button at least some people will click it. The real question I think you’re asking is whether people would struggle if the buttons weren’t there and I would suggest many people would, but I can’t prove it without testing (and neither can anyone ...


8

Use the postal codes and corresponding area locations. It's an already implemented obfuscation/aggregation system adjusted for population density.


7

Getting in the trap of scrolling map area instead of page scrolling is definitely bad experience. Still current solution looks overcomplicated and provides a barrier to interaction. The design looks a bit contradictory: large map area assumes reach user interaction with map content (primary task), but scrolling beyond map control looks like users don't need ...


7

Examples 1-3 could be individually plotted using a heat map. Yes, it may be reasonable if you have high resolution data. In this representation heat map is an invaluable tool (besides opinable choice of color pair): However if you do not have high resolution data then an heat map is not the only available solution. Take for example this low-res map: Which ...


7

You can show clickable text on your info-box, I think that will help user to understand the clickable thing more clearly. something like this-


7

The thinking behind not implementing the buttons is because the zoom/pinch gestures are almost considered second nature these days. A cleaner UI allows the user to focus on the content, which in this case is finding a location on a map. The buttons within a mobile context of such limited real estate can be of a nuisance and can just get in the way. However,...


6

I recently worked on an app that had a feature that allowed the user to search or browse for clinics nearby. One thing I got from the tests is that the map view works great mainly for visually displaying (quickly) what is nearby the user. They can process that much faster via the map/pin UI. However, if the user is looking for more information or browsing, ...


6

If these things are strongly correlated in users' minds to geographic locations, then I would certainly try to work "location" or "point" into the name. If these are reports of incidents or conditions, and only weakly correlated to geography, you might call them "issues", "reports", "incidents", etc. All the examples you gave seem to fall more into the ...


6

In an enterprise webapp we are developing we make the distinction between: modals: can only be closed through very deliberate action, because closing would break some flow or may cause data loss. These have no X button, cannot be closed by clicking outside modal. Most do have a separate "abort" button, making it more explicit that closing may result in data ...


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